1

I've been searching for a pathetically long time for this, so I would appreciate any help or hint I can get.

I'm trying to plot some sea ice freeboard data (netCDF, Gridded total freeboard) on the Antarctic sea, but the data that should plot nicely around Antarctica lies at the bottom of my image. NetCDF and matplotlib are fairly new to me so maybe the error could be e.g. with handling the dimensions or the projection.

from scipy.io.netcdf import netcdf_file as Dataset
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

FB = Dataset('./datasets/fb-0217-0320.nc', 'r')
f = FB.variables['f'][:,:]
lat = FB.variables['lat'][:,0]
lon = FB.variables['lon'][0,:]
masked_fb = np.ma.masked_where(np.isnan(f), f)
mtx_lon, mtx_lat = np.meshgrid(lon, lat)
m = Basemap(projection='spstere',boundinglat=-50, lon_0=180., resolution='l')
m.bluemarble()

plt.figure()
m.pcolormesh(mtx_lon, mtx_lat, masked_fb, latlon=True)
plt.show()

ncdump gives:

dimensions:
x = 79 ;
y = 83 ;
variables:
float lat(y, x) ;
    lat:standard_name = "latitude" ;
    lat:long_name = "latitude coordinate" ;
    lat:units = "degrees_north" ;
float lon(y, x) ;
    lon:standard_name = "longitude" ;
    lon:long_name = "longitude coordinate" ;
    lon:units = "degrees_east" ;
float f(y, x) ;
    f:long_name = "total_freeboard" ;
    f:units = "mm" ;
    f:coordinates = "lat lon" ;

One weird thing I noticed is that min lat is -5156.6201 but I didn't know how to count how many of them there are...

Edit: Formated the code to fit the common way, like Neil advised.

1

Okay, I got help from matplotlib and thought I should share this here if someone else has sometimes similar problems. The problem was with meshgrid. Since the latitudes and longitudes in the netCDF file were already in 2D the meshgrid was unnecessary. The solution that worked for me was:

from scipy.io.netcdf import netcdf_file as Dataset
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

FB = Dataset('./datasets/fb-0217-0320.nc', 'r')
f = FB.variables['f'][:,:]
lat = FB.variables['lat'][:,:]
lon = FB.variables['lon'][:,:]
masked_fb = np.ma.masked_where(np.isnan(f), f)
m = Basemap(projection='spstere',boundinglat=-50, lon_0=180., resolution='l')
m.bluemarble()

plt.figure()
m.pcolormesh(lon, lat, masked_fb, latlon=True)
plt.show()
0

First, it's common practice to read in the netcdf module as

from scipy.io.netcdf import netcdf_file as Dataset

You can then read in the file and access variables as

FB = Dataset('./datasets/fb-0217-0320.nc', 'r')
f = FB.variables['f'][:,:]
lat = FB.variables['lat'][:,:]
lon = FB.variables['lon'][:,:]

Are you sure that lat[:,0] and lon[0,:] is reading in the grid coordinates correctly? ncdump indicates they are 2D variables and I suspect that the issue is creating a meshgrid from lat[:,0] and lon[0,:].

  • Thank you for pointing out the common way of reading the module, it's always better especially for a beginner to do it the common way. And no, I'm not sure at all about the coordinate reading but that was the only way I was able to plot anything. Guess I have to take an even deeper look into that. – pandapoo Jun 24 '14 at 6:19
  • Neil I think you suspected right that meshgrid is the reason for error. When keeping track of the shapes, if I read lon[:] (or lon[:,:]), the shape is (83,79) but with lon[:,0] it is (79,), also masked_fb is (83,79). But meshgrid turns mtx_lon into (6557,6557) which causes another error. When I handled coordinates like lon[0,:] meshgrid produced mtx_lon like (83,79). – pandapoo Jun 24 '14 at 8:16
  • So it does appears that you need to retain the 2D structure of lat and lon. matplotlib struggles with this, unfortunately, and my honest suggestion is to use a program like NCL (ncl.ucar.edu/index.shtml), which handles netCDF files (and 2D grids) much better than matplotlib. Check out that link, there are many clear examples of how to do a plot like you want, e.g. ncl.ucar.edu/Applications/polar.shtml – N1B4 Jun 24 '14 at 19:24
  • I've never heard of NCL but it looks very useful! Unfortunately this was an assignment meant to be done with Python. I found something called PyNGL, a Python interface to the NCL Graphics Library, which seems quite convenient, but I'm not sure if we're allowed to use that... Anyways thank you for the NCL tip! – pandapoo Jun 25 '14 at 6:59

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