5

I know that this is an implementation detail, but I'm curious: Is there a bound on the number of hash buckets used in a .NET Dictionary? I assume that it will be somewhere around 2 * numberOfElements, but does anyone know for sure (or is it documented anywhere)?

7

In short: it uses a size equal to the first prime number greater than [numberOfElements]. However it does not consider every prime number: it uses a table for sizes upto a limit, and for bigger sizes it computes a prime number the hard way.

If you look in the source, you can spot the following table in a class called HashHelpers: (I guess this means you need 7.2 million items before it starts computing prime numbers)

public static readonly int[] primes = {
        3, 7, 11, 17, 23, 29, 37, 47, 59, 71, 89, 107, 131, 163, 197, 239, 293, 353, 431, 521, 631, 761, 919,
        1103, 1327, 1597, 1931, 2333, 2801, 3371, 4049, 4861, 5839, 7013, 8419, 10103, 12143, 14591,
        17519, 21023, 25229, 30293, 36353, 43627, 52361, 62851, 75431, 90523, 108631, 130363, 156437,
        187751, 225307, 270371, 324449, 389357, 467237, 560689, 672827, 807403, 968897, 1162687, 1395263,
        1674319, 2009191, 2411033, 2893249, 3471899, 4166287, 4999559, 5999471, 7199369};
  • 2
    Actually, a lot of primes are missing. 2, 5, 13, 19, 31, etc. It looks like it just uses primes that are sufficiently far apart, since it's not worth it to worry about all the intermediate ones. – Kendall Frey Jun 23 '14 at 13:17
  • @KendallFrey I suppose so. There are A LOT of primes. Storing them all would be crazy. It doesn't matter much if the capacity is 17 or 19. But they're not doing it in the most efficient way, though: referencesource.microsoft.com/#mscorlib/system/collections/… – Dennis_E Jun 23 '14 at 13:24

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