61

Hi I have the following table

 --------------------------------------------
 |  id  |  city  |  Latitude  |  Longitude  |
 --------------------------------------------
 |  1   |   3    |   34.44444 |   84.3434   |
 --------------------------------------------
 |  2   |   4    | 42.4666667 | 1.4666667   |
 --------------------------------------------
 |  3   |   5    |  32.534167 | 66.078056   |
 --------------------------------------------
 |  4   |   6    |  36.948889 | 66.328611   |
 --------------------------------------------
 |  5   |   7    |  35.088056 | 69.046389   |
 --------------------------------------------
 |  6   |   8    |  36.083056 |   69.0525   |
 --------------------------------------------
 |  7   |   9    |  31.015833 | 61.860278   |
 --------------------------------------------

Now I want to get distance between two points. Say a user is having a city 3 and a user is having a city 7. My scenario is one user having a city and latitue and longtitude is searching other users distance from his city. For example user having city 3 is searching. He wants to get distance of user of any other city say it is 7. I have searched and found following query

SELECT `locations`.`city`, ( 3959 * acos ( cos ( radians(31.589167) ) * cos( radians( Latitude ) ) * cos( radians( Longitude ) - radians(64.363333) ) + sin ( radians(31.589167) ) * sin( radians( Latitude ) ) ) ) AS `distance` FROM `locations` HAVING (distance < 50)

As for as I know this query finds distance from one point to all other points. Now I want to get distance from one point to other point.

Any guide line will be much appreciated.

8
  • So do a self-join against the table to get both sets of coordinates, and then you just run your calculation on those two points.
    – Marc B
    Commented Jun 23, 2014 at 16:40
  • Have you considered taking this out of a SQL query, an using the Google Maps API for this? I know it doesn't answer your question. But you may find that this work is already done for you.
    – durbnpoisn
    Commented Jun 23, 2014 at 16:41
  • @MarcB Didn't get your point dear
    – Enthusiast
    Commented Jun 23, 2014 at 16:45
  • @durbnpoisn No I don't want that solution. This is my requirement.
    – Enthusiast
    Commented Jun 23, 2014 at 16:45
  • @MarcB This query will run in loop so I will be having values of both points.But how to put in this query isn't easy to understand.
    – Enthusiast
    Commented Jun 23, 2014 at 16:46

8 Answers 8

125

I think your question says you have the city values for the two cities between which you wish to compute the distance.

This query will do the job for you, yielding the distance in km. It uses the spherical cosine law formula.

Notice that you join the table to itself so you can retrieve two coordinate pairs for the computation.

SELECT a.city AS from_city, b.city AS to_city, 
   111.111 *
    DEGREES(ACOS(LEAST(1.0, COS(RADIANS(a.Latitude))
         * COS(RADIANS(b.Latitude))
         * COS(RADIANS(a.Longitude - b.Longitude))
         + SIN(RADIANS(a.Latitude))
         * SIN(RADIANS(b.Latitude))))) AS distance_in_km
  FROM city AS a
  JOIN city AS b ON a.id <> b.id
 WHERE a.city = 3 AND b.city = 7

Notice that the constant 111.1111 is the number of kilometres per degree of latitude, based on the old Napoleonic definition of the metre as one ten-thousandth of the distance from the equator to the pole. That definition is close enough for location-finder work.

If you want statute miles instead of kilometres, use 69.0 instead.

http://sqlfiddle.com/#!9/21e06/412/0

If you're looking for nearby points you may be tempted to use a clause something like this:

   HAVING distance_in_km < 10.0    /* slow ! */
    ORDER BY distance_in_km DESC

That is (as we say near Boston MA USA) wicked slow.

In that case you need to use a bounding box computation. See this writeup about how to do that. http://www.plumislandmedia.net/mysql/haversine-mysql-nearest-loc/

The formula contains a LEAST() function. Why? Because the ACOS() function throws an error if its argument is even slightly greater than 1. When the two points in question are very close together, the expression with the COS() and SIN() computations can sometimes yield a value slightly greater than 1 due to floating-point epsilon (inaccuracy). The LEAST(1.0, dirty-great-expression) call copes with that problem.

There's a better way, a formula by Thaddeus Vincenty. It uses ATAN2() rather than ACOS() so it's less susceptible to epsilon problems.


Edit 2022 (by Alexio Vay): As of today the modern solution should be the following short code:

   select ST_Distance_Sphere(
    point(-87.6770458, 41.9631174),
    point(-73.9898293, 40.7628267)) 

Please check out the answer of Naresh Kumar.

5
  • what you have written here and on sqlfiddle are different. Though both works but sqlfiddle one gives accurate result. Commented Feb 11, 2015 at 12:12
  • 2
    Used the code to query for the closest location of 2 coordinates. Worked well!
    – El Dude
    Commented Jun 14, 2015 at 22:56
  • 6
    I was getting null values for very close distances when using this formula in mysql. My soultion was to add a "LEAST" function to prevent out of bounds numbers. DEGREES(ACOS(LEAST(COS(RADIANS(lat)) * COS(RADIANS(google_lat)) * COS(RADIANS(lng - google_lng)) + SIN(RADIANS(lat)) * SIN(RADIANS(google_lat)),1.0))) AS distance_in_km,
    – Robert
    Commented May 4, 2017 at 12:17
  • 1
    Thanks you for your answer. Could you explain reason behind using least function and inserting 1.0 ?
    – haneulkim
    Commented Sep 20, 2019 at 0:25
  • makewhite, good question! Please see the comment of @Robert and my recent edit.
    – O. Jones
    Commented Sep 20, 2019 at 11:50
76

You can use the ST_Distance_Sphere() MySQL built-in function, supported since MySQL 5.7 version and above. It computes the distance in meters more efficiently.

select ST_Distance_Sphere(point(lng, lat), point(lng,lat))

i.e.

    select ST_Distance_Sphere(
        point(-87.6770458, 41.9631174),
        point(-73.9898293, 40.7628267)
    ) 

Referred from Calculating distance using MySQL

5
  • 1
    This needs to be way more up and the nowadays accepted answer. This solution is the modern solution.
    – AlexioVay
    Commented Mar 1, 2022 at 15:58
  • 2
    Note that the result is given in Meters, so you may need to convert it.
    – arrmani88
    Commented Jul 17, 2022 at 20:10
  • 1
    This answer gives you only approximate distance and NOT accurate. @O. Jones method using COS gives exact same as google map distance calculator.
    – Vinith
    Commented Jul 26, 2022 at 12:30
  • 2
    In my tests the ST_Distance_Sphere is 3-5 times slower than the accepted answer with the long COS term. To calculate the distance of my 16480 zip codes against my location it takes 160ms with the ST_Distance_Sphere method and only 63ms with the cos term.
    – heiwil
    Commented Jan 9, 2023 at 7:47
  • 1
    Similar results here, but not as bad 1.73 times slower. ST_Distance_Sphere on GCP took 2.04 seconds to calculate ~1 million records with 1 vCPU and 614.4 MB RAM MySQL 8.0. And 1.18 seconds with the accepted answer. I'll use ST_Distance_Sphere for readability, later if I need to optimize, I'll use the accepted answer. (P.S. My test excludes network times and only includes calculation times. Network times for downloading 1M rows would take significantly longer.)
    – IcyIcicle
    Commented Aug 24, 2023 at 22:30
34

Heres is MySQL query and function which use to get distance between two latitude and longitude and distance will return in KM.

Mysql Query :-

SELECT (6371 * acos( 
                cos( radians(lat2) ) 
              * cos( radians( lat1 ) ) 
              * cos( radians( lng1 ) - radians(lng2) ) 
              + sin( radians(lat2) ) 
              * sin( radians( lat1 ) )
        ) ) as distance 
FROM your_table;

Mysql Function :-

DELIMITER $$
CREATE FUNCTION `getDistance`(`lat1` VARCHAR(200), `lng1` VARCHAR(200), `lat2` VARCHAR(200), `lng2` VARCHAR(200)) RETURNS varchar(10) CHARSET utf8
begin
declare distance varchar(10);

set distance = (select (6371 * acos( 
                                     cos( radians(lat2) ) 
                                   * cos( radians( lat1 ) ) 
                                   * cos( radians( lng1 ) - radians(lng2) )       
                                   + sin( radians(lat2) ) 
                                   * sin( radians( lat1 ) )
                ) ) as distance); 

if(distance is null)
then
 return '';
else 
return distance;
end if;
end$$
DELIMITER ;

How to use in your PHP Code

SELECT getDistance($lat1,$lng1,$lat2,$lng2) as distance 
FROM your_table.
1
  • 2
    Almost a decade later, this function gives THE SAME results as Google Maps distance measurement. Thank you! Commented May 6, 2020 at 15:40
15

Here's a MySQL function that will take two latitude/longitude pairs, and give you the distance in degrees between the two points. It uses the Haversine formula to calculate the distance. Since the Earth is not a perfect sphere, there is some error near the poles and the equator.

  • To convert to miles, multiply by 3961.
  • To convert to kilometers, multiply by 6373.
  • To convert to meters, multiply by 6373000.
  • To convert to feet, multiply by (3961 * 5280) 20914080.
DELIMITER $$

CREATE FUNCTION \`haversine\`(

        lat1 FLOAT, lon1 FLOAT,
        lat2 FLOAT, lon2 FLOAT
     ) RETURNS float
    NO SQL
    DETERMINISTIC
    COMMENT 'Returns the distance in degrees on the Earth between two known points of latitude and longitude. To get miles, multiply by 3961, and km by 6373'

BEGIN

    RETURN DEGREES(ACOS(
              COS(RADIANS(lat1)) *
              COS(RADIANS(lat2)) *
              COS(RADIANS(lon2) - RADIANS(lon1)) +
              SIN(RADIANS(lat1)) * SIN(RADIANS(lat2))
            ));

END;

DELIMITER;
4
  • Notice that the value 3961 is the distance on the surface of the earth you travel when you move one radian north or south.
    – O. Jones
    Commented Oct 25, 2018 at 12:00
  • I think it's 6371 instead of 6373.
    – Buffalo
    Commented Jul 25, 2020 at 9:46
  • 1
    Do not use the DEGREES call if you are converting to miles/km/etc, the conversion factors are in RADIANS, so you don't want to convert to degrees before multiplying by the conversion factor.
    – Andy
    Commented Sep 22, 2020 at 0:07
  • Thanks for the information about the conversion
    – RahulAN
    Commented Dec 6, 2020 at 16:53
4

Not sure how your distance calculation is going on but you need to do a self join your table and perform the calculation accordingly. Something like this probably

select t1.id as userfrom, 
t2.id as userto, 
( 3959 * acos ( cos ( radians(31.589167) ) * cos( radians( t1.Latitude ) ) * 
cos( radians( t1.Longitude ) - radians(64.363333) ) + sin ( radians(31.589167) ) * 
sin( radians( t2.Latitude ) ) ) ) AS `distance` 
from table1 t1 
inner join table1 t2 on t2.city > t1.city
3

IMPORTANT! Anyone using or copying these calculations MAKE SURE to use least(1.0, (...)) when passing the calculation to the acos() function. The acos() function will NOT take a value above 1 and I have found when comparing lat/lng values that are identical there are times when the calculations come out to something like 1.000002. This will produce a distance of NULL instead of 0 and may not return results you're looking for depending on how your query is structured!

This is CORRECT:

select round( 
  ( 3959 * acos( least(1.0,  
    cos( radians(28.4597) ) 
    * cos( radians(lat) ) 
    * cos( radians(lng) - radians(77.0282) ) 
    + sin( radians(28.4597) ) 
    * sin( radians(lat) 
  ) ) ) 
), 1) as distance
from locations having distance <= 60 order by distance

This is WRONG:

select round( 
  ( 3959 * acos( 
    cos( radians(28.4597) ) 
    * cos( radians(lat) ) 
    * cos( radians(lng) - radians(77.0282) ) 
    + sin( radians(28.4597) ) 
    * sin( radians(lat) 
  ) ) 
), 1) as distance
from locations having distance <= 60 order by distance

The highest rated answer also talks about this, but I wanted to make sure this was very clear since I just found a long standing bug in my query.

1

Here's a formula I converted from https://www.geodatasource.com/developers/javascript

It's a nice clean function that calculates the distance in KM

DELIMITER $$
CREATE DEFINER=`root`@`localhost` FUNCTION `FN_GET_DISTANCE`(
lat1 DOUBLE, lng1 DOUBLE, lat2 DOUBLE, lng2 DOUBLE
) RETURNS double
BEGIN
    DECLARE radlat1 DOUBLE;
    DECLARE radlat2 DOUBLE;
    DECLARE theta DOUBLE;
    DECLARE radtheta DOUBLE;
    DECLARE dist DOUBLE;
    SET radlat1 = PI() * lat1 / 180;
    SET radlat2 = PI() * lat2 / 180;
    SET theta = lng1 - lng2;
    SET radtheta = PI() * theta / 180;
    SET dist = sin(radlat1) * sin(radlat2) + cos(radlat1) * cos(radlat2) * cos(radtheta);
    SET dist = acos(dist);
    SET dist = dist * 180 / PI();
    SET dist = dist * 60 * 1.1515;
    SET dist = dist * 1.609344;
RETURN dist;
END$$
DELIMITER ;

You'll also find the same function in different languages on the site;

-2

Maybe someone will come in handy, I managed to implement my task through the FN_GET_DISTANCE function:

SELECT SUM (t.distance) as Distance FROM
(SELECT (CASE WHEN (FN_GET_DISTANCE (Latitude, Longitude, @OLDLatitude, @OLDLongitude)) BETWEEN 0.01 AND 2 THEN
FN_GET_DISTANCE (Latitude, Longitude, @OLDLatitude, @OLDLongitude) ELSE 0 END) AS distance,
IF (@OLDLatitude IS NOT NULL, @OLDLatitude: = Latitude, 0),
IF (@OLDLongitude IS NOT NULL, @OLDLongitude: = Longitude, 0)
FROM `data`, (SELECT @OLDLatitude: = 0) var0, (SELECT @OLDLongitude: = 0) var1
WHERE ID_Dev = 1
AND DateTime BETWEEN '2021-05-23 08:00:00' AND '2021-05-23 20:00:00'
ORDER BY ID DESC) t;

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.