9

I have a dataframe

df = pd.DataFrame(columns = ["AA", "BB", "CC"])
df.loc[0]= ["a", "b", "c1"]
df.loc[1]= ["a", "b", "c2"]
df.loc[2]= ["a", "b", "c3"]

I need to add secod row to header

df.columns = pd.MultiIndex.from_tuples(zip(df.columns, ["DD", "EE", "FF"]))

my df is now

  AA BB  CC
  DD EE  FF
0  a  b  c1
1  a  b  c2
2  a  b  c3

but when I write this dataframe to csv file

df.to_csv("test.csv", index = False)

I get one more row than expected

AA,BB,CC
DD,EE,FF
,,
a,b,c1
a,b,c2
a,b,c3
  • This definitely looks like a bug, recommending posting this as a github issue. – Andy Hayden Jun 23 '14 at 19:27
  • any workarround how to get the expected format without this extra line? – Meloun Jun 23 '14 at 19:36
  • Late to the party, I know. But I was searching for a fix to the same issue. Pandas 0.19.0 and above has this issue fixed – BoffWx Jul 27 '17 at 9:32
6

It's an ugly hack, but if you needed something to work Right Now(tm), you could write it out in two parts:

>>> pd.DataFrame(df.columns.tolist()).T.to_csv("noblankrows.csv", mode="w", header=False, index=False)
>>> df.to_csv("noblankrows.csv", mode="a", header=False, index=False)
>>> !cat noblankrows.csv
AA,BB,CC
DD,EE,FF
a,b,c1
a,b,c2
a,b,c3
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  • lol, snap! Though this is a neater way of writing out the header! – Andy Hayden Jun 23 '14 at 19:46
  • 1
    Be careful... I tried this, and it re-ordered the headers into alphabetic order, which were then out of alignment with the column values. – Spike Williams Apr 24 '16 at 20:06
3

I think this is a bug in to_csv. If you're looking for workarounds then here's a couple.

To read back in this csv specify the header rows*:

In [11]: csv = "AA,BB,CC
DD,EE,FF
,,
a,b,c1
a,b,c2
a,b,c3"

In [12]: pd.read_csv(StringIO(csv), header=[0, 1])
Out[12]:
  AA BB  CC
  DD EE  FF
0  a  b  c1
1  a  b  c2
2  a  b  c3

*strangely this seems to ignore the blank lines.

To write out you could write the header first and then append:

with open('test.csv', 'w') as f:
    f.write('\n'.join([','.join(h) for h in zip(*df.columns)]) + '\n')
df.to_csv('test.csv', mode='a', index=False, header=False)

Note the to_csv part for MultiIndex column here:

In [21]: '\n'.join([','.join(h) for h in zip(*df.columns)]) + '\n'
Out[21]: 'AA,BB,CC\nDD,EE,FF\n'
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  • not a bug, this is the defined format, you can specify tupleize_cols=True to make it write a multi-index header as a single row. – Jeff Jun 23 '14 at 20:03
  • @Jeff this isn't about making it as a single row: Try without tupleize_cols, it adds the ,,,, line to the csv (a bug??). – Andy Hayden Jun 23 '14 at 20:30
  • the names are None, but it still HAS names. not a bug. In order to have an exact reproduction is HAS to have the line. the reader happens to be able to read either format. Their is an open issue to NOT print the empty line which is a stylistic issue. the reader is robust to this. not specifying the header in a multi-index columns is a USER error. not a bug. – Jeff Jun 23 '14 at 20:47
2

Use df.to_csv("test.csv", index = False, tupleize_cols=True) to get the resulting CSV to be:

"('AA', 'DD')","('BB', 'EE')","('CC', 'FF')"
a,b,c1
a,b,c2
a,b,c3

To read it back:

df2=pd.read_csv("test.csv", tupleize_cols=True)
df2.columns=pd.MultiIndex.from_tuples(eval(','.join(df2.columns)))

To get the exact output you wanted:

with open('test.csv', 'a') as f:
    pd.DataFrame(np.asanyarray(df.columns.tolist())).T.to_csv(f, index = False, header=False)
    df.to_csv(f, index = False, header=False)
|improve this answer|||||
  • That would not be a good to way to write to a CSV anyway because you will also have a hard time read it back. See edit. – CT Zhu Jun 23 '14 at 19:11
  • Yeap, you will get the same df, if thats what you are asking. See edit – CT Zhu Jun 23 '14 at 19:28
  • sorry, but I am not satisfied with that.. I need really the output as described because it's an input for other application, there is no pandas reading back.. – Meloun Jun 23 '14 at 19:34
  • See edit. You can do it in two steps, write the header, then the body. – CT Zhu Jun 23 '14 at 19:47
2

Building on top of @DSM's solution:

if you need (as I did) to apply the same hack to an export to excel, the main change needed (apart from expected differences with the to_excel method) is to actually remove the multiindex used for your column labels...

That's because .to_excel doesn't support writing out a df having a multiindex for columns but no index (providing index=False to the .to_excel method) contrarily to .to_csv

Anyway, here's what it would look like:

>>> writer = pd.ExcelWriter("noblankrows.xlsx")
>>> headers = pd.DataFrame(df.columns.tolist()).T
>>> headers.to_excel(
        writer, header=False, index=False)
>>> df.columns = pd.Index(range(len(df.columns)))  # that's what I was referring to...
>>> df.to_excel(
        writer, header=False, index=False, startrow=len(headers))
>>> writer.save()
>>> pd.read_excel("noblankrows.xlsx").to_csv(sys.stdout, index=False)
AA,BB,CC
DD,EE,FF
a,b,c1
a,b,c2
a,b,c3
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