100

I am new to C++. I often see conditional statement like below:

if 
  statement_0;
else if
  statement_1;

Question:

Syntactically, shall I treat else if as a single keyword? Or is it actually an nested if statement within the outer else like below?

if 
  statement_0;
else 
  if
    statement_1;
13
  • 5
    To your second point. Syntactically it is almost always written else if – TheNorthWes Jun 23 '14 at 18:46
  • 8
    No, as that would make the grammar still more complex: a word is a word without space. Other languages though have keywords like elseif and ELIF. In fact only (?) the programming language Algol68 allows a space in an identifier; nice too: PROC walk through tree () – Joop Eggen Jun 23 '14 at 18:48
  • 3
    Fortran (at least the fixed form versions), and all standardized versions of Algol allow spaces anywhere. One story has it that apparently punch card punchers were prone to adding spaces when typing in code; another simply that allowing spaces in variable names would let programmers use better names and the problems weren't foreseen. – prosfilaes Jun 24 '14 at 7:52
  • 1
    The elseif keyword exists in VB and PHP. – Salman A Jun 25 '14 at 7:08
  • 3
    Nitpick: although C++ officially doesn't have keywords with spaces in them, it does have constructs like for all intents and purposes work that way. For instance, long double, you have to write that in that way. longdouble is incorrect. – Mr Lister Jun 25 '14 at 9:12
133

They are not a single keyword if we go to the draft C++ standard section 2.12 Keywords table 4 lists both if and else separately and there is no else if keyword. We can find a more accessible list of C++ keywords by going to cppreferences section on keywords.

The grammar in section 6.4 also makes this clear:

selection-statement:
 if ( condition ) statement
 if ( condition ) statement else statement

The if in else if is a statement following the else term. The section also says:

[...]The substatement in a selection-statement (each substatement, in the else form of the if statement) implicitly defines a block scope (3.3). If the substatement in a selection-statement is a single statement and not a compound-statement, it is as if it was rewritten to be a compound-statement containing the original substatement.

and provides the following example:

if (x)
 int i;

can be equivalently rewritten as

if (x) {  
  int i;
}

So how is your slightly extended example parsed?

if 
  statement_0;
else 
  if
    statement_1;
  else
    if
      statement_2 ;

will be parsed like this:

if 
{
  statement_0;
}
else
{ 
    if
    {
      statement_1;
    }
    else
    {
        if
        {
         statement_2 ;
        }
    }
}

Note

We can also determine that else if can not be one keyword by realizing that keywords are identifiers and we can see from the grammar for an identifier in my answer to Can you start a class name with a numeric digit? that spaces are not allowed in identifiers and so therefore else if can not be a single keyword but must be two separate keywords.

8
  • 1
    You could deduce this without the standard? In ASM its: jeq (if | else if), jne (if | else if), jmp (else). Based on that, I'd have said it was a single keyword.. probably not syntactically but instruction-wise. – Brandon Jun 23 '14 at 23:02
  • 18
    @Brandon I highly doubt you could reliably go from assembly language to high level constructs without intimate knowledge of the grammar being used and the compiler itself. – Shafik Yaghmour Jun 24 '14 at 13:52
  • Though do note that this definition potentially leads to the wonderful "dangling else" ambiguous syntax tree problem when defining the grammar in the parser... – LinearZoetrope Jun 24 '14 at 16:15
  • 2
    Some languages don't support else if, but instead elsif. In those languages, else if is truly one keyword. However, C-based languages generally do not, as this answer states. – sfdcfox Jun 25 '14 at 14:15
  • 1
    I think @Krumia wanted to see a final else statement. I would appreciate this, too. – Matthias Jul 15 '14 at 20:11
78

Syntactically, it's not a single keyword; keywords cannot contain white space. Logically, when writing lists of else if, it's probably better if you see it as a single keyword, and write:

if ( c1 ) {
    //  ...
} else if ( c2 ) {
    //  ...
} else if ( c3 ) {
    //  ...
} else if ( c4 ) {
    //  ...
} // ...

The compiler literally sees this as:

if ( c1 ) {
    //  ...
} else {
    if ( c2 ) {
        //  ...
    } else {
        if ( c3 ) {
            //  ...
        } else {
            if ( c4 ) {
                //  ...
            } // ...
        }
    }
}

but both forms come out to the same thing, and the first is far more readable.

3
  • 1
    Actually, the compiler didn't see literally else followed by a compound-statement. After an else, It look for statement (which might be like return; or f()) or a compound-statement... – The Mask Jun 23 '14 at 19:08
  • @TheMask: Per Shafik Yaghmour's answer above, the compiler literally sees a single statement, but pretends it saw a compound-statement. – Ilmari Karonen Jun 24 '14 at 8:45
  • This answer dictates that how parser extract tokens. Good. – haccks Jun 26 '14 at 9:12
24

No, it is not.
They are two keywords and, moreover, the second "if" is a substatement "inside" the scope determined by the first "else" statement.

2
  • 2
    Though that this well describes what's going on, you may want to add some references for the actual language definitions to prove better what you are saying. – πάντα ῥεῖ Jun 23 '14 at 19:00
  • 2
    @πάνταῥεῖ: You are right about the references, but this work has been well done yet by Shafik Yaghmour. His answer was the accepted one and I have voted up, also. My job is finished here. – pablo1977 Jun 23 '14 at 19:03
16

You can see the scope by using curly braces:

if(X) {
  statement_0;
}
else {
  if(Y) {
    statement_1;
  }  
}

And normally implemented with two distinct keywords, one is if and one is else.

6
  • So I suppose those who insist that curly braces should be used wherever a compound statement is accepted should be writing all their nontrivial conditionals like this, huh? :) – dlf Jun 23 '14 at 18:54
  • 5
    I think one can overdo anything, even our all beloved curly braces. Don't Do This At Home. – jcklie Jun 23 '14 at 19:01
  • 1
    All the brace-structured languages (that I know of) that require curly braces around all substatements, even if composed of a single statement, have a single-token keyword with the meaning "else if". I think that's telling. – zwol Jun 24 '14 at 21:53
  • @Zack: Swift is a language that breaks your rule. It requires curly braces even for single-statement code blocks, but does not have an "else if" keyword. On the other hand, the grammar is quite different from C. An if-statement ends with an optional else-clause. An else-clause is either else code-block or else if-statement. code-block includes mandatory braces. So the else keyword can only be followed by { or if. – GraniteRobert Jun 25 '14 at 2:05
  • @GraniteRobert Haven't had time to look at Swift much at all myself, but that's an interesting data point; I was thinking that a grammar like that was a possibility but had never seen it done. And you'll note that that, too, avoids making people write "else { if ... }". – zwol Jun 25 '14 at 2:28
10

As already answered, it isn't. They are two keywords. It's start of two statements one following each one other. To try make it a bit more clear, here's the BNF gramar which deal with if and else statements in C++ language.

 statement:      
    labeled-statement
    attribute-specifier-seqopt expression-statement
    attribute-specifier-seqopt compound-statement    
    attribute-specifier-seqopt selection-statement  
    attribute-specifier-seqopt iteration-statement    
    attribute-specifier-seqopt jump-statement  
    declaration-statement
    attribute-specifier-seqopt try-block

   selection-statement: 
         if ( condition ) statement
     if ( condition ) statement else statement

Note that statement itself include selection-statement. So, combinations like:

if (cond1)
   stat
else if(cond2)
   stat
else
   stat

are possible and valid according to C++ standard/semantics.

Note: C++ grammar take from this page.

1

else and if are two different C++ keywords. An if statement can be followed by an optional else if...else statement. An if statement can have zero or more else if's and they must come before the else.

You can find syntax and example in this if...else statement tutorial

0
-1

I would just like to add my point of view to all these explanations. As I see it, if you can use these keywords separately, they must be TWO keywords. Maybe you can have a look at c++ grammar, from this link in stackoverflow: Is there a standard C++ grammar?

Regards

-1

An if statement can be followed by an optional else if...else statement, which is very useful to test various conditions using single if...else if statement.

When using if , else if , else statements there are few points to keep in mind.

An if can have zero or one else's and it must come after any else if's.

An if can have zero to many else if's and they must come before the else.

Once an else if succeeds, none of he remaining else if's or else's will be tested.

have a look if...else statement tutorial.

2
  • 2
    This just doesn't correspond to the standard, and moreover, is redundant. The language has all the expressive power to simulate else if as if it were a keyword, so there'd be no sense in defining it explicitly. – Ruslan Jun 24 '14 at 14:18
  • 1
    This is a useful simplification for programmers. But the question isn't asking how to use if statements. – Cruncher Jun 25 '14 at 13:17

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