21

I'm getting a Runtime error related the the anti-forgery attribute.

Perform the following steps:

  1. Create an MVC web application and start
  2. Register joe@acme.org
  3. Sign out
  4. Register jane@acme.org
  5. Sign out
  6. Login as joe@acme.org
  7. Hit the back button
  8. Login as jane@acme.org

Error: The provided anti-forgery token was meant for a different claims-based user than the current user.

What can be done to prevent this error from occurring?

23

This is one way of ignoring the error and returning the user to the login screen. It's just an example.

Create a new class called HandleAntiforgeryTokenErrorAttribute that inherits from HandleErrorAttribute. Override the OnException method.

public class HandleAntiforgeryTokenErrorAttribute : HandleErrorAttribute
{
    public override void OnException(ExceptionContext filterContext)
    {
        filterContext.ExceptionHandled = true;
        filterContext.Result = new RedirectToRouteResult(
            new RouteValueDictionary(new { action = "Login", controller = "Account" }));
    }
}

Go to your FilterConfig class and register the attribute as a global filter.

public class FilterConfig
{
    public static void RegisterGlobalFilters(GlobalFilterCollection filters)
    {
        filters.Add(new HandleErrorAttribute());
        filters.Add(new HandleAntiforgeryTokenErrorAttribute()
            { ExceptionType = typeof(HttpAntiForgeryException) }
        );
    }
}
  • Where would that go? The error occurs before public async Task<ActionResult> Login(LoginViewModel model, string returnUrl) is even called – WhiskerBiscuit Jun 24 '14 at 3:11
  • @RowanFreeman No the given solution is not working. Before hitting Login ActionResult its giving error. The provided anti-forgery token was meant for user "", but the current user is "joe@acme.org". – RajeshKdev Jun 24 '14 at 4:24
  • Yeah, nice pick-up. I forgot that this would be occurring early in the pipeline. I'll update my answer. – Rowan Freeman Jun 24 '14 at 4:28
  • 3
    Thank you for the update. Hence the above code is handling the error nicely. But willing to know, what is the proper way? Since the user is already logged in. But its redirecting me to login. from there i'm able to navigate any page without login. Hope you got the functional problem. – RajeshKdev Jun 24 '14 at 6:05
  • 1
    This is just catching all exceptions.... ??? – Joe_DM Sep 29 '16 at 8:12
32

I had this same problem just now and solved it by disabling caching of the login view. It actually makes a lot of sense, and requires no code or exception handling.

My log in controller method now looks like this:

[AllowAnonymous]
[OutputCache(NoStore = true, Location = OutputCacheLocation.None)]
public ActionResult LogOn(Uri returnUrl)

When caching is disabled and the user clicks the back button on the browser, a new request is made to the server and the page is delivered again, with the antiforgery token set to the correct user.

I feel this is a much cleaner, easier and logical approach to the problem.

  • When I do login, then logout and for the last login again (all this with the same user), this code not works for me. On second login returns the error: "The provided anti-forgery token was meant for a different claims-based user than the current user". – mggSoft Jan 20 '15 at 8:52
  • Worked well for me, nice idea – DennisWelu Apr 9 '15 at 23:51
  • I found that chrome shows an ERR_CACHE_MISS error message if you remove the cache for POST requests and navigate to it using the back button – ajbeaven Sep 16 '15 at 21:23
  • I had this problem and there were two causes: (1) users double-clicking the "log on" button; and (2) the login page being erroneously cached as described here. You have to tell the client browser not to cache the login page, which I think is good security practice anyway. – philw Oct 2 '15 at 8:45
  • Worked well for me. Incidentally, this is also a workaround for the well-documented but extant bug in Firefox when you disable a button with Javascript and it stays disabled upon page refresh and after pressing back. Google "firefox buttons stay disabled" – nmit026 Nov 20 '16 at 23:12
3

Accepted answers just catches all exceptions, because it doesn't filter them by exception type like original HandleErrorAttribute does.

Use the following code to only handle HttpAntiForgeryException:

public static class FilterConfig
{
    public static void RegisterGlobalFilters(GlobalFilterCollection filters)
    {
        filters.Add(new HandleErrorAttribute());
        filters.Add(new HandleAntiforgeryTokenErrorAttribute());
    }
}

public class HandleAntiforgeryTokenErrorAttribute : HandleErrorAttribute
{
    public HandleAntiforgeryTokenErrorAttribute()
    {
        ExceptionType = typeof(HttpAntiForgeryException);
    }

    public override void OnException(ExceptionContext filterContext)
    {
        if (!ExceptionType.IsInstanceOfType(filterContext.Exception))
        {
            return;
        }

        filterContext.ExceptionHandled = true;
        filterContext.Result =
            new RedirectToRouteResult(
                new RouteValueDictionary(
                    new {
                            area = string.Empty,
                            action = "Index",
                            controller = "Home"
                        }));

    }
}
0

Cached old pages, brought back to life witht the back-button, contain old anti-forgery tokens and cause the exception. The global filter solution by Rowan Freeman redirects to the login page. However, this caching problem is also causing the site to serve an old login page with an old token. Submitting the form will cause the same exception. Ergo, IMO, both solutions (Rowan Freeman's and julealgon's) solutions should be implemented.

Theorectically, avoiding caching for every page should do the trick aswell, but at a significant cost (latency, bandwidth). I choose to reroute to the login to be able to use caching and avoid caching on the login to mitigate the exception, i.e. implementing both.

  • This should be a comment, but you have insufficient rep. Please explain why the solution by @julealgon is not enough by itself. It appears to do the trick. – Gone Coding Dec 1 '15 at 10:37
  • The solution by julealgon will only work if the browser respects the instruction to disable the cache (in some instances Internet Explorer can and will ignore this and cache the page anyway). Rowan's solution is a good fall back in this case. – hobwell Feb 29 '16 at 20:00

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