6

So there is a question on what DIM is, but I can't find why I want to use it.

As far as I can tell, I see no difference between these three sets of code:

'Example 1
myVal = 2

'Example 2
DIM myVal as Integer
myVal = 2

'Example 3
DIM myVal = 2

If I omit DIM the code still runs, and after 2 or 3 nested loops I see no difference in the output when they are omitted. Having come from Python, I like to keep my code clean*.

So why should I need to declare variables with DIM? Apart from stylistic concerns, is there a technical reason to use DIM?

* also I'm lazy and out of the habit of declaring variables.

18
  • 2
    All local variables are stored on the stack as with all languages (and most parameters to functions). When a sub exits the stack is returned to how it was before the sub executed. So all memory is freed. Strings and objects are stored elsewhere in a object manager or string manager and the stack contains a pointer but vb looks after freeing it. Seting a vbstring (a bstr) to zero length frees all but two bytes. That's why we try to avoid global variables.
    – phd443322
    Jun 24, 2014 at 5:33
  • 2
    In scripting type programs, typeless programming has many advantages. Programs are short and use few variables so memory and speed don't matter - it will be fast enough. As programs get more complex it does matter. VB was designed for typeless programming as well as typed programming. For most excel macros, typeless programming is fine and is more readable. Vbscript only supports typeless programming (and you can paste it into vba/vb6).
    – phd443322
    Jun 24, 2014 at 6:00
  • 2
    FWIW, Example 3 will not work in VBA. You cannot declare and assign a variable on the same line.
    – Rory
    Jun 24, 2014 at 9:04
  • 2
    @mehow a constant is, by definition, not a variable. ;) I take your point about optional arguments.
    – Rory
    Jun 24, 2014 at 15:31
  • 2
    @mehow That's up to you. The VBA language specification would not agree. ;)
    – Rory
    Jun 24, 2014 at 15:55

3 Answers 3

12

Using Dim makes the intentions of your code explicit and prevents common mistakes like a typo actually declaring a new variable. If you use Option Explicit On with your code (which I thoroughly recommend) Dim becomes mandatory.

Here's an example of failing to use Dim causing a (potentially bad) problem:

myVar = 100

' later on...

myVal = 10      'accidentally declare new variable instead of assign to myVar

Debug.Print myVar     'prints 100 when you were expecting 10

Whereas this code will save you from that mistake:

Option Explicit

Dim myVar as Integer
myVar = 100

' later on...

myVal = 10    ' error: Option Explicit means you *must* use Dim

More about Dim and Option Explicit here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/y9341s4f.aspx

5
  • Sorry, I'm after a technical reason and I've clarified the answer as such. While interesting points, they don't justify the additional commands required, and also doesn't address my "Example 2" with declaring with a type instead of a value.
    – user764357
    Jun 24, 2014 at 4:59
  • 13
    Since you never make mistakes and don't care about performance, you should never declare your variables. The rest of us benefit from the compiler's help.
    – Mike Woolf
    Jun 24, 2014 at 5:02
  • @MikeWoolf Make an answer telling me how DIM improves performance - because so far I see claims of allocation of memory (without the explicit ability to free again) that would have been necessary in VB3, but now just seem outdated.
    – user764357
    Jun 24, 2014 at 5:17
  • The problem is that you've been given some very good technical reasons to declare your variables, yet reject these on grounds that are unclear in the extreme. A variant is much larger than an int and must undergo runtime checks on every operation.
    – Mike Woolf
    Jun 24, 2014 at 5:37
  • @MikeWoolf The only place a "variant" is described is briefly without explanation in a comment. This question isn't a "very good technical reason" its a stylistic reason, and a type safety reason. But both of those can be over come with good discipline. The best technical answer with an actual explanation is a comment from phd443322 regarding scoping and memory freeing.
    – user764357
    Jun 24, 2014 at 6:09
11

Any variable used without declaration is of type Variant. While variants can be useful in some circumstances, they should be avoided when not required, because they:

  1. Are slower
  2. Use more memory
  3. Are more error prone, either through miss spelling or through assigning a value of the wrong data type
1
  • 2
    ++ chris. Also worth mentioning that some Variant type is worked out by the compiler at runtime and it may not always be what you think it was going to be. Very good follow up
    – user2140173
    Jun 24, 2014 at 15:30
5

Moderators, I'm making an effort, assuming you'll treat me with due respect in thefuture.

All local variables are stored on the stack as with all languages (and most parameters to functions). When a sub exits the stack is returned to how it was before the sub executed. So all memory is freed. Strings and objects are stored elsewhere in a object manager or string manager and the stack contains a pointer but vb looks after freeing it. Seting a vbstring (a bstr) to zero length frees all but two bytes. That's why we try to avoid global variables.

In scripting type programs, typeless programming has many advantages. Programs are short and use few variables so memory and speed don't matter - it will be fast enough. As programs get more complex it does matter. VB was designed for typeless programming as well as typed programming. For most excel macros, typeless programming is fine and is more readable. Vbscript only supports typeless programming (and you can paste it into vba/vb6).

1
  • 3
    dynamic typing vs static typing is the exact terminology. Typeless would imply that variables have no type, which is not true.
    – z̫͋
    Jun 24, 2014 at 11:10

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