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OK, I hate doing something for no reason, especially if it appears to be the stupidest thing I've ever seen, so here goes:

I'm encountering a codebase where the PHP files start with <?php, but don't end with ?>

I have not seen any documentation on why, but apparently this has something to do with "security".

Can someone enlighten me as to why I would break with common sense and leave out the closing PHP tag at the bottom of a file?

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    I don't think this has to do with security. Only thing I can think of is preventing trailing spaces at the end of the document. I also hate it and think this is bad practice. In my opinion it should be changed in future versions to give a notice or syntax error. – nl-x Jun 24 '14 at 11:06
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The documentation states:

If a file is pure PHP code, it is preferable to omit the PHP closing tag at the end of the file. This prevents accidental whitespace or new lines being added after the PHP closing tag, which may cause unwanted effects because PHP will start output buffering when there is no intention from the programmer to send any output at that point in the script.

It has nothing to do with "security". It has something to do with functions whose behaviour depends on whether output has already been sent to the client or not. The best example is the function header(). It is meant for manipulating the HTTP response headers. This function will work only before any output has been send - as in HTTP there headers cannot being sent after the body.

Let's get back to the nature of PHP. It is a scripting language which can be embedded into other documents, like HTML:

<html>
  <head><title><?php echo $title; ?></title></head>
  <body><?php echo $body; ?></body>
</html>

When embedded into other documents PHP's output will be inserted into the document, leaving the original document as-is, meaning just sending it's literal content to the client.


When you have a class file, for example:

<?php

class Foo {

}

?><whitespace>...
<newline>
<newline>

... you are closing the PHP tag and have two forgotten spaces and new lines in the file. PHP would send those spaces and new lines to the client, meaning a function like header() wouldn't work anymore. This simply a text document with embedded PHP code. (Unlike source code files in other languages). PHP will replace the part between the <?php ?> and send the results + remaining parts of the file to the client.

If you omit the closing PHP tag in this case, the PHP parser would just ignore the spaces and newlines because they don't contain code.

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  • What is said in the documentation is just stupid. If this is really the case, then we should also preferably (by default even) omit the starting <?php tag. They should just remove this feature in future versions. – nl-x Jun 24 '14 at 11:08
  • agreed, another processing task that would slow the program down. – Samuel Fullman Jun 24 '14 at 11:16
  • @nl-x I've added some explanation. I hope this clearifies it. You need to understand the nature of PHP. – hek2mgl Jun 24 '14 at 11:17
  • @hek2mgl You didn't have to clarify anything for me. Sorry if I was not clear. I was just spilling my guts over this poor decision taken by the PHP team. – nl-x Jun 24 '14 at 11:20
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    @nl-x If you have spaces before the starting tag you could see it in your editor right away. That's not the case with spaces after the closing tag. – yunzen Jun 24 '14 at 11:33
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According to php.net reason behind avoiding ending php tag is:

"If a file is pure PHP code, it is preferable to omit the PHP closing tag at the end of the file. This prevents accidental whitespace or new lines being added after the PHP closing tag, which may cause unwanted effects because PHP will start output buffering when there is no intention from the programmer to send any output at that point in the script."

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