40

I have a List where sometimes it is empty or null. I want to be able to check if it contains any List-item and if not then add an object to the List.

 // I have a list, sometimes it doesn't have any data added to it
    var myList = new List<object>(); 
 // Expression is always false
    if (myList == null) 
        Console.WriteLine("List is never null"); 
    if (myList[0] == null) 
        myList.Add("new item"); 
    //Errors encountered:  Index was out of range. Must be non-negative and less than the size of the collection.
    // Inner Exception says "null"
  • 3
    please change your accepted answer to L-Four's answer as it is far better than mine and the question seems to be useful for many so let the better answer be selected. – Amit Joki Jan 9 '18 at 15:20

16 Answers 16

52

Try the following code:

 if ( (myList!= null) && (!myList.Any()) )
 {
     // Add new item
     myList.Add("new item"); 
 }

A late EDIT because for these checks I now like to use the following solution. First, add a small reusable extension method called Safe():

public static class IEnumerableExtension
{       
    public static IEnumerable<T> Safe<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
    {
        if (source == null)
        {
            yield break;
        }

        foreach (var item in source)
        {
            yield return item;
        }
    }
}

And then, you can do the same like:

 if (!myList.Safe().Any())
 {
      // Add new item
      myList.Add("new item"); 
 }

I personally find this less verbose and easier to read. You can now safely access any collection without the need for a null check.

  • 5
    we can use myList?.Count() > 0 or myList?Length > 0 or myList?.Any()? – amit jha Apr 6 '18 at 12:27
37

For anyone who doesn't have the guarantee that the list will not be null, you can use the null-conditional operator to safely check for null and empty lists in a single conditional statement:

if (list?.Any() != true)
{
    // Handle null or empty list
}
  • if (list?.Any().GetValueOrDefault()) - can be another approach which remove negated comparison – Basin Nov 3 '18 at 20:48
  • Do you mean if (list?.Any()?.GetValueOrDefault())? Yes, that would be another good approach. It's a bit less obvious (to me. at least) at a glance, but it's an equally good solution :) – mech Nov 9 '18 at 6:15
  • yes, I try to avoid negated condition, if possible, every time I see !variable or != ;) – Basin Nov 19 '18 at 9:47
19

Checkout L-Four's answer.

A less-efficient answer:

if(myList.Count == 0){
    // nothing is there. Add here
}

Basically new List<T> will not be null but will have no elements. As is noted in the comments, the above will throw an exception if the list is uninstantiated. But as for the snippet in the question, where it is instantiated, the above will work just fine.

If you need to check for null, then it would be:

if(myList != null && myList.Count == 0){
  // The list is empty. Add something here
}

Even better would be to use !myList.Any() and as is mentioned in the aforementioned L-Four's answer as short circuiting is faster than linear counting of the elements in the list.

  • 46
    this will throw an exception when the list is null – TechSavvySam Nov 9 '15 at 13:13
  • 4
    not the good answer... use it if you know that the list is instancied – Pierre May 3 '17 at 11:44
  • 1
    Instead of myList.Count == 0 Use myList.Any() which is more common, readable and clear. – Sumit Joshi Jan 8 '18 at 6:15
  • @SumitJoshi It is also more efficient. Count will check each element of the list. – rmlarsen Jan 9 '18 at 14:43
12

What about using an extension method?

public static bool AnyOrNotNull<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
  if (source != null && source.Any())
    return true;
  else
    return false;
}
  • 2
    I wonder why something like this is not built in, just like String.IsNullOrEmpty(string str) – rolls Nov 25 '16 at 1:58
  • 5
    Why not just return source != null && source.Any();? – Rob Jens Apr 21 '17 at 16:29
  • 5
    Your method name is AnyOrNotNull but your comparison is AND, i think that the correct name is AnyAndNotNull. – Carlinhos Jul 7 '17 at 16:52
6

Assuming that the list is never null, the following code checks if the list is empty and adds a new element if empty:

if (!myList.Any())
{
    myList.Add("new item");
}

If it is possible that the list is null, a null check must be added before the Any() condition:

if (myList != null && !myList.Any())
{
    myList.Add("new item");
}

In my opinion, using Any() instead of Count == 0 is preferable since it better expresses the intent of checking if the list has any element or is empty. However, considering the performance of each approach, using Any() is generally slower than Count.

  • I really want to upvote this but the null check should be: if (myList == null || !myList.Any()) – BA TabNabber Mar 21 '17 at 16:17
  • @BATabNabber: It is actually a non null check. If myList is null we cannot add any item to it. See also the answer from L-Four. – Luca Cremonesi Mar 23 '17 at 19:05
3

Your List has no items, that's why access to non-existing 0th item

myList[0] == null

throws Index was out of range exception; when you want to access n-th item check

  if (myList.Count > n)
    DoSomething(myList[n])

in your case

  if (myList.Count > 0) // <- You can safely get 0-th item
    if (myList[0] == null) 
      myList.Add("new item");
3

If you want a single line condition that checks both null and empty, you can use

if (list == null ? true : (!list.Any()))

This will work in older framework versions where the null-conditional operator is not available.

2

List in c# has a Count property. It can be used like so:

if(myList == null) // Checks if list is null
    // Wasn't initialized
else if(myList.Count == 0) // Checks if the list is empty
    myList.Add("new item");
else // List is valid and has something in it
    // You could access the element in the list if you wanted
2

myList[0] gets the first item in the list. Since the list is empty there is no item to get and you get the IndexOutOfRangeException instead.

As other answers here have shown, in order to check if the list is empty you need to get the number of elements in the list (myList.Count) or use the LINQ method .Any() which will return true if there are any elements in the list.

1

Try and use:

if(myList.Any())
{

}

Note: this assmumes myList is not null.

  • 6
    this will throw an exception when the list is null – TechSavvySam Nov 9 '15 at 13:14
  • 1
    return true; // this assumes the list is not null or empty – downhand Mar 15 '18 at 7:05
  • it's not an answer. it's gives error. – Brijesh Mavani Mar 14 at 13:29
1
if (myList?.Any() == true) 
{
   ...
}

I find this the most convenient way. '== true' checks the value of the nullable bool implied by '?.Any()

1

I was wondering nobody suggested to create own extension method more readable name for OP's case.

public static bool IsNullOrEmpty<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    if (source == null)
    {
        return true;
    }

    return source.Any() == false;
}
0

We can validate like below with Extension methods. I use them for all of my projects.

  var myList = new List<string>();
  if(!myList.HasValue())
  {
     Console.WriteLine("List has value(s)");              
  }

  if(!myList.HasValue())
  {
     Console.WriteLine("List is either null or empty");           
  }

  if(myList.HasValue())
  {
      if (!myList[0].HasValue()) 
      {
          myList.Add("new item"); 
      }
  }




/// <summary>
/// This Method will return True if List is Not Null and it's items count>0       
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
/// <param name="items"></param>
/// <returns>Bool</returns>
public static bool HasValue<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items)
{
    if (items != null)
    {
        if (items.Count() > 0)
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}


/// <summary>
/// This Method will return True if List is Not Null and it's items count>0       
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
/// <param name="items"></param>
/// <returns></returns>
public static bool HasValue<T>(this List<T> items)
{
    if (items != null)
    {
        if (items.Count() > 0)
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}


/// <summary>
///  This method returns true if string not null and not empty  
/// </summary>
/// <param name="ObjectValue"></param>
/// <returns>bool</returns>
public static bool HasValue(this string ObjectValue)
{
    if (ObjectValue != null)
    {
        if ((!string.IsNullOrEmpty(ObjectValue)) && (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(ObjectValue)))
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}
0

You can use Count property of List in c#

please find below code which checks list empty and null both in a single condition

if(myList == null || myList.Count == 0)
{
    //Do Something 
}
0

Because you initialize myList with 'new', the list itself will never be null.

But it can be filled with 'null' values.

In that case .Count > 0 and .Any() will be true. You can check this with the .All(s => s == null)

var myList = new List<object>();
if (myList.Any() || myList.All(s => s == null))
0

We can add an extension to create an empty list

    public static IEnumerable<T> Nullable<T>(this IEnumerable<T> obj)
    {
        if (obj == null)
            return new List<T>();
        else
            return obj;
    }

And use like this

foreach (model in models.Nullable())
{
    ....
}

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