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Working on an initial Rails project, and using Rubocop to analyze code style. It led me to question exactly how Ruby's nested classes work in the context of Rails. For example, in my engine, I have a model:

# app/models/app_core/tenant.rb
module AppCore
  class Tenant < ActiveRecord::Base
  end
end

and a controller:

# app/controllers/app_core/tenant/members_controller.rb
module AppCore
  class Tenant::MembersController < ApplicationController
  end
end

In the model's case, the module is the same as the path and the class name is the same as the file name. In the controllers case, the second part of the path, "tenant" is part of the class name.

Rubocop tells me that I should "Use nested class definitions instead of compact style" in the Tenant::MembersController line, so if I understand correctly...

module AppCore  
  class Tenant
    class MembersController < ApplicationController
    end
  end
end

...this shouldn't make a difference.

Now, my question is I have AppCore::Tenant as a model, but then AppCore::Tenant looks to be reopened and the MembersController class is added to it as a nested class. Does this mean that my Tenant class will always have that nested class in it? Do I need to name my models and controller routes something differently? Is this totally fine and nothing to worry about? Not exactly sure what this means.

0

3 Answers 3

26

One subtle difference is that your scope is different, and this can cause errors. In the first case constants will be looked up in AppCore, whereas in the second case constants will be looked up in AppCore::Tenant. If you fully qualify constant names then it doesn't make a difference.

Foo = :problem

module A
  Foo = 42

  # looks up A::Foo because of lexical scope
  module B
    def self.foo
      Foo
    end
  end
end

# looks up ::Foo because of lexical scope
module A::C
  def self.foo
    Foo
  end
end

# Looks up A::Foo, fully qualified ... ok technically ::A::Foo is fully qualified, but meh.
module A::D
  def self.foo
    A::Foo
  end
end

A::B.foo # => 42
A::C.foo # => :problem
A::D.foo # => 42

If you are referring to constants defined in AppCore::Tenant from within MembersController then it might make a difference for you. Subtle but possibly important, and good to be aware of. I've hit this in real life when I had a Util module with a String submodule. I moved a method into Util and it broke because String inside that method now referred to Util::String. I changed some naming conventions after that.

Your Tenant module will always have MembersController as a nested class. Anywhere else in your codebase you can refer to AppCore::Tenant::MembersController. If you want better separation then you should name your model classes differently, or put them inside a module such as AppCore::Model or similar. If you're using Rails you'll have to buck some conventions, but the configuration required for that is not too bad.

2
  • I like the idea of putting my Models in a Model Module (that's a mouthful). Good tip. Jun 24, 2014 at 17:54
  • 1
    OTOH the compact form does not create the parent module/class, while the nested form does, which also can lead to hard-to-find errors.
    – radiospiel
    Nov 18, 2015 at 15:24
0

I am aware that you are asking about the technical specifics, and Sami has answered that. But I can't help myself and have to ask:

Is there a particular reason in the first place why you want to...

  1. ...introduce a "path" like hierarchy?
  2. ...place the controller inside a model class?

If I would feel the need for 1), I would probably have simple "container" modules echoing the real paths. That is, app/model/tenant.rb => Model::Tenant and app/controller/members_controller.rb => Controller::MembersController.

But frankly, I don't really see the reasoning behind it. Controllers are already easilly spotted by the XyzController convention. Models are (most times, I guess) rather easily recognized by their domain-like nature. Since ruby does not require or even suggest to match path names to class names (unlike Java, for example), a clear 1-level naming convention would be more useful to me.

Submodule/subclass hierarchies are very useful, or rather required, for gems, where they function like namespaces to avoid clashes.

2) (Controller inside a Model) is fundamentally wrong. Controllers are very very different from Models and certainly do not live inside one.

0

If you are using nested and want to go back to the top-level nampespace you can use ::.

def class user < ActiveRecord::Base 
   NAME = "Real User"
end

module SomeModule
    def class User 
       Name = "Fake User"
    end 
    module InnerModule
        class MyClass
            puts User.NAME # "Fake User"
            puts ::User.Name # "Real User" 
        end
    end
end

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