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I'm using C# and the built in testing tools in VS 2013.

For example, I have an Order object that has a list of Customer objects. I have 2 methods to remove a customer from an Order. One takes a Customer object as the parameter, the other takes the Id of the Customer. The first method does the actual removal. The 2nd method uses the Id to find the Customer instance in the order and then passes that instance to the first method.

The first method has full test coverage. In testing the second method I really only need to verify that it finds the customer and then calls the first method. I don't need to verify that the Customer actually gets removed since the tests for the first method take care of that.

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The first method has full test coverage. In testing the second method I really only need to verify that it finds the customer and then calls the first method. I don't need to verify that the Customer actually gets removed since the tests for the first method take care of that.

I disagree. That is precisely what you need to test, because that is the purpose of the method you are testing. How it goes about getting there is an implementation detail.

The method has a goal: to remove a customer from an order. Your unit test has to ensure that the customer is removed from the order. You must then arrange your data and then invoke your method and finally verify the result. The method might dog food another method in the same class now, but that doesn't mean you can't change the implementation later. However, if you do change the implementation, you already have tests to verify you did not break functionality as you do so.

The other way to look at it, and this is what I try to do when writing tests, is to think of the system under test as a black box. You don't know how it does its job, and you don't really care. You only know it has a job to do and you're writing tests to verify that it does it. There are some pieces that are exposed to you (dependencies, arguments, results), but the implementation itself is not your concern while writing the test. Therefore, the fact that it reuses functionality already tested is also not your concern.

Despite all this, if you feel you are repeating yourself too much with your tests, then that is an opportunity to see if your system can be redesigned (for example, there might actually exist another class or dependency that could be extracted), but in reality your system might already be simple enough and your tests, while seemingly repetitive, are there to ensure that no matter what path you take, the design performs its responsibilities correctly.

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  • I guess this is the way I should be thinking about it. Instead of thinking of the 2nd method's responsibility as "find the customer, then call this other method" I should be thinking about it as simply "remove the customer". – Mike B Jun 24 '14 at 21:06
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I don't need to verify that the Customer actually gets removed since the tests for the first method take care of that.

What if the methods are changed sometime in the future? Now the second method doesn't utilize the first and is broken but your tests are still passing?

I would still test for the expected result of both methods. Except I wouldn't think of it in terms of testing the individual methods; think of it as testing behavior. If you're given a valid Id, the customer is removed. And if you're given a valid Customer, the customer is removed. The expected behavior isn't that a customer was successfully retrieved by id within the method. The expected behavior is that a customer is removed when given a valid argument, whether that's an id or customer object so test for that.

I don't know your full requirements but I'd write tests like:

  1. GivenValidId_RemovesCustomer
  2. GivenValidCustomer_RemovesCustomer
  3. GivenNullCustomer_ThrowsException
  4. GivenInvalidId_ThrowsException
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