14

I wanted to know what the best way to write a large fortran array ( 5000 x 5000 real single precision numbers) to a file. I am trying to save the results of a numerical calculation for later use so they do not need to be repeated. From calculation 5000 x 5000 x 4bytes per number number is 100 Mb, is it possible to save this in a form that is only 100Mb? Is there a way to save fortran arrays as a binary file and read it back in for later use?

I've noticed that saving numbers to a text file produces a file much larger than the size of the data type being saved. Is this because the numbers are being saved as characters?

The only way I am familiar with to write to file is

open (unit=41, file='outfile.txt')

do  i=1,len
    do j=1,len

        write(41,*) Array(i,j)
    end do
end do

Although I'd imagine there is a better way to do it. If anyone could point me to some resources or examples to approve my ability to write and read larger files efficiently (in terms of memory) that would be great. Thanks!

25

Write data files in binary, unless you're going to actually be reading the output - and you're not going to be reading a 2.5 million-element array.

The reasons for using binary are threefold, in decreasing importance:

  • Accuracy
  • Performance
  • Data size

Accuracy concerns may be the most obvious. When you are converting a (binary) floating point number to a string representation of the decimal number, you are inevitably going to truncate at some point. That's ok if you are sure that when you read the text value back into a floating point value, you are certainly going to get the same value; but that is actually a subtle question and requires choosing your format carefully. Using default formatting, various compilers perform this task with varying degrees of quality. This blog post, written from the point of view of a games programmer, does a good job of covering the issues.

Let's consider a little program which, for a variety of formats, writes a single-precision real number out to a string, and then reads it back in again, keeping track of the maximum error it encounters. We'll just go from 0 to 1, in units of machine epsilon. The code follows:

program testaccuracy

    character(len=128) :: teststring
    integer, parameter :: nformats=4
    character(len=20), parameter :: formats(nformats) =   &
        [ '( E11.4)', '( E13.6)', '( E15.8)', '(E17.10)' ]
    real, dimension(nformats) :: errors

    real :: output, back
    real, parameter :: delta=epsilon(output)
    integer :: i

    errors = 0
    output = 0
    do while (output < 1)
        do i=1,nformats
            write(teststring,FMT=formats(i)) output
            read(teststring,*) back
            if (abs(back-output) > errors(i)) errors(i) = abs(back-output)
        enddo
        output = output + delta
    end do

    print *, 'Maximum errors: '
    print *, formats
    print *, errors

    print *, 'Trying with default format: '

    errors = 0
    output = 0
    do while (output < 1)
        write(teststring,*) output
        read(teststring,*) back
        if (abs(back-output) > errors(1)) errors(1) = abs(back-output)
        output = output + delta
    end do

    print *, 'Error = ', errors(1)

end program testaccuracy

and when we run it, we get:

$ ./accuracy 
 Maximum errors: 
 ( E11.4)            ( E13.6)            ( E15.8)            (E17.10)            
  5.00082970E-05  5.06639481E-07  7.45058060E-09   0.0000000    
 Trying with default format: 
 Error =   7.45058060E-09

Note that even using a format with 8 digits after the decimal place - which we might think would be plenty, given that single precision reals are only accurate to 6-7 decimal places - we don't get exact copies back, off by approximately 1e-8. And this compiler's default format does not give us accurate round-trip floating point values; some error is introduced! If you're a video-game programmer, that level of accuracy may well be enough. If you're doing time-dependant simulations of turbulent fluids, however, that might absolutely not be ok, particularly if there's some bias to where the error is introduced, or if the error occurs in what is supposed to be a conserved quantity.

Note that if you try running this code, you'll notice that it takes a surprisingly long time to finish. That's because, maybe surprisingly, performance is another real issue with text output of floating point numbers. Consider the following simple program, which just writes out your example of a 5000 × 5000 real array as text and as unformatted binary:

program testarray
    implicit none
    integer, parameter :: asize=5000
    real, dimension(asize,asize) :: array

    integer :: i, j
    integer :: time, u

    forall (i=1:asize, j=1:asize) array(i,j)=i*asize+j

    call tick(time)
    open(newunit=u,file='test.txt')
    do i=1,asize
        write(u,*) (array(i,j), j=1,asize)
    enddo
    close(u)
    print *, 'ASCII: time = ', tock(time)

    call tick(time)
    open(newunit=u,file='test.dat',form='unformatted')
    write(u) array
    close(u)
    print *, 'Binary: time = ', tock(time)


contains
    subroutine tick(t)
        integer, intent(OUT) :: t
        call system_clock(t)
    end subroutine tick

    ! returns time in seconds from now to time described by t 
    real function tock(t)
        integer, intent(in) :: t
        integer :: now, clock_rate
        call system_clock(now,clock_rate)
        tock = real(now - t)/real(clock_rate)
    end function tock

end program testarray

Here are the timing outputs, for writing to disk or to ramdisk:

Disk:
 ASCII: time =    41.193001    
 Binary: time =   0.11700000    
Ramdisk
 ASCII: time =    40.789001    
 Binary: time =   5.70000000E-02

Note that when writing to disk, the binary output is 352 times as fast as ASCII, and to ramdisk it's closer to 700 times. There are two reasons for this - one is that you can write out data all at once, rather than having to loop; the other is that generating the string decimal representation of a floating point number is a surprisingly subtle operation which requires a significant amount of computing for each value.

Finally, is data size; the text file in the above example comes out (on my system) to about 4 times the size of the binary file.

Now, there are real problems with binary output. In particular, raw Fortran (or, for that matter, C) binary output is very brittle. If you change platforms, or your data size changes, your output may no longer be any good. Adding new variables to the output will break the file format unless you always add new data at the end of the file, and you have no way of knowing ahead of time what variables are in a binary blob you get from your collaborator (who might be you, three months ago). Most of the downsides of binary output are avoided by using libraries like NetCDF, which write self-describing binary files that are much more "future proof" than raw binary. Better still, since it's a standard, many tools read NetCDF files.

There are many NetCDF tutorials on the internet; ours is here. A simple example using NetCDF gives similar times to raw binary:

$ ./array 
 ASCII: time =    40.676998    
 Binary: time =   4.30000015E-02
 NetCDF: time =   0.16000000  

but gives you a nice self-describing file:

$ ncdump -h test.nc
netcdf test {
dimensions:
    X = 5000 ;
    Y = 5000 ;
variables:
    float Array(Y, X) ;
        Array:units = "ergs" ;
}

and file sizes about the same as raw binary:

$ du -sh test.*
96M test.dat
96M test.nc
382M    test.txt

the code follows:

program testarray
    implicit none
    integer, parameter :: asize=5000
    real, dimension(asize,asize) :: array

    integer :: i, j
    integer :: time, u

    forall (i=1:asize, j=1:asize) array(i,j)=i*asize+j

    call tick(time)
    open(newunit=u,file='test.txt')
    do i=1,asize
        write(u,*) (array(i,j), j=1,asize)
    enddo
    close(u)
    print *, 'ASCII: time = ', tock(time)

    call tick(time)
    open(newunit=u,file='test.dat',form='unformatted')
    write(u) array
    close(u)
    print *, 'Binary: time = ', tock(time)

    call tick(time)
    call writenetcdffile(array)
    print *, 'NetCDF: time = ', tock(time)


contains
    subroutine tick(t)
        integer, intent(OUT) :: t
        call system_clock(t)
    end subroutine tick

    ! returns time in seconds from now to time described by t 
    real function tock(t)
        integer, intent(in) :: t
        integer :: now, clock_rate
        call system_clock(now,clock_rate)
        tock = real(now - t)/real(clock_rate)
    end function tock

    subroutine writenetcdffile(array)
        use netcdf
        implicit none
        real, intent(IN), dimension(:,:) :: array

        integer :: file_id, xdim_id, ydim_id
        integer :: array_id
        integer, dimension(2) :: arrdims
        character(len=*), parameter :: arrunit = 'ergs'

        integer :: i, j
        integer :: ierr

        i = size(array,1)
        j = size(array,2)

        ! create the file
        ierr = nf90_create(path='test.nc', cmode=NF90_CLOBBER, ncid=file_id)

        ! define the dimensions
        ierr = nf90_def_dim(file_id, 'X', i, xdim_id)
        ierr = nf90_def_dim(file_id, 'Y', j, ydim_id)

        ! now that the dimensions are defined, we can define variables on them,...
        arrdims = (/ xdim_id, ydim_id /)
        ierr = nf90_def_var(file_id, 'Array',  NF90_REAL, arrdims, array_id)

        ! ...and assign units to them as an attribute 
        ierr = nf90_put_att(file_id, array_id, "units", arrunit)

        ! done defining
        ierr = nf90_enddef(file_id)

        ! Write out the values
        ierr = nf90_put_var(file_id, array_id, array)

        ! close; done
        ierr = nf90_close(file_id)
    return
    end subroutine writenetcdffile
end program testarray
  • Actually, I believe simulations of turbulent fluids is the case that can be quite possibly done in single precision if done with care. It is chaotic anyway and the long term averages are often not sensitive to that. The speedup, especially on accelerators, can be large. – Vladimir F Jun 24 '14 at 22:34
  • @VladimirF - in this case it's not the amount of error that's the problem (e.g., single vs double) - it's the possibly biased and certainly nonconservative way that it's being introduced by the round-trip through text representation. But obviously whether that's negligible or wreaks havoc depends hugely on the nature of your problem and solvers. – Jonathan Dursi Jun 24 '14 at 23:16
  • 1
    @JonathanDursi Regarding my blog post you said "This blog post, written from the point of view of a games programmer, does a good job of covering the issues; but note that for technical computing (which is presumably why you're using Fortran), we may be much more demanding about accuracy." With all due respect, that is incorrect. In that post I show that, for the compilers that I tested (VC++ and gcc, including transferring text between the two) there was zero loss of precision across all four-billion floats. It is literally impossible to be more demanding about accuracy than "perfect." – Bruce Dawson Mar 5 '15 at 20:51
  • @BruceDawson - I see what you mean about that follow on clause being misleading; I'll just delete that second part. – Jonathan Dursi Mar 5 '15 at 21:10
4

OPEN the file for reading and writing as "unformatted", and READ and WRITE the data without supplying a format, as demonstrated in the program below.

program xunformatted
integer, parameter :: n = 5000, inu = 20, outu = 21
real               :: x(n,n)
integer            :: i
character (len=*), parameter :: out_file = "temp_num"
call random_seed()
call random_number(x)
open (unit=outu,form="unformatted",file=out_file,action="write")
do i=1,n
   write (outu) x(i,:) ! write one row at a time
end do
print*,"sum(x) =",sum(x)
close (outu)
open (unit=inu,form="unformatted",file=out_file,action="read")
x = 0.0
do i=1,n
   read (inu) x(i,:)   ! read one row at a time
end do
print*,"sum(x) =",sum(x)
end program xunformatted

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