89

I'm trying to declare an argument in Swift that takes an optional closure. The function I have declared looks like this:

class Promise {

 func then(onFulfilled: ()->(), onReject: ()->()?){       
    if let callableRjector = onReject {
      // do stuff! 
    }
 }

}

But Swift complains that "Bound value in a conditional must be an Optional type" where the "if let" is declared.

  • Consider using only one closure with parameters. – catanore Jul 25 at 7:32
103

You should enclose the optional closure in parentheses. This will properly scope the ? operator.

func then(onFulfilled: ()->(), onReject: (()->())?){       
    if let callableRjector = onReject {
      // do stuff! 
    }
 }
  • Do you know what the rationale is for having to enclose it in parenthesis? – Marcosc Jun 24 '14 at 20:56
  • 4
    Probably to remove ambiguity. If the optional closure were to have a return value, it could get confusing as to what ()->Int? means. – Cezar Jun 24 '14 at 20:58
  • 3
    Also, from the Swift book: “When declaring an optional type, be sure to use parentheses to properly scope the ? operator. As an example, to declare an optional array of integers, write the type annotation as (Int[])?; writing Int[]? produces an error.” – Cezar Jun 24 '14 at 20:59
  • @Cezar Could you please explain a bit why and where to use "Optional closure", I am curious to know this. – iLearner Apr 6 at 14:17
53

To make the code even shorter we can use nil as default value for onReject parameter and optional chaining ?() when calling it:

func then(onFulfilled: ()->(), onReject: (()->())? = nil) {
  onReject?()
}

This way we can omit onReject parameter when we call then function.

then({ /* on fulfilled */ })

We can also use trailing closure syntax to pass onReject parameter into then function:

then({ /* on fulfilled */ }) {
  // ... on reject
}

Here is a blog post about it.

33

Since I assume, that this "optional" closure should simply do nothing, you could use a parameter with an empty closure as default value:

func then(onFulfilled: ()->(), onReject: ()->() = {}){       
    // now you can call your closures
    onFulfilled()
    onReject()
}

this function can now be called with or without the onReject callback

then({ ... })
then({ ... }, onReject: { ... })

No need for Swift's awesome Optionals? here!

  • Good solution!! – Aznix Oct 16 '14 at 5:47
  • i like this solution, much simpler and easy to read. – keithics Mar 28 '15 at 15:11
  • This is nice solution! – Roland T. Feb 27 '17 at 18:43
3

Maybe it's a cleaner way. Specially when the closure has complicated parameters.

typealias SimpleCallBack = () -> ()

class Promise {

func then(onFulfilled: SimpleCallBack, onReject: SimpleCallBack?){       
    if let callableRjector = onReject {
        // do stuff! 
    }
}

}

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