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I have to create a hash in Perl using SHA256 HMAC like this PHP example:

<?php
$key = pack('H*','THIS_IS_KEY');
$str ='THIS IS DE ENCODED STRING';
echo strtoupper(hash_hmac('sha256',$str, $key));
?>

I get: 601B7C81389A37FC83C05275138280E8788CF9108528BC75D5C09CEA75904D5E

But if I do the same in a Perl script:

use Digest::SHA qw(hmac_sha256_hex);
my $key = pack('H*','THIS_IS_KEY');
my $str ='THIS IS DE ENCODED STRING';
print uc(hmac_sha256_hex($str, $key));
exit;

I get: C683FD81DEFB7CDA3C031F5280682E80851FDC246310DB8C44057BC6364454E0

If I don't pack key neither Perl or PHP I get the same result, unfortunately I have to generate Perl exactly the same result as the example using PHP "pack".

I would appreciate if someone can help me find a solution.

Thanks in advance

Welch

  • 2
    What is the actual key used in both cases? That is - is the problem related to pack at all? Do the different hmac functions treat it (or the str) differently? – user2864740 Jun 25 '14 at 3:06
  • 1
    Assuming your PHP error logging is set high enough, the PHP code you provided should spew out quite a few warnings regarding your use of pack. Try hard-coding $key = 1234 in both scripts, and notice that the digests generated are identical. The PHP and Perl implementations of HMAC SHA256 both behave the same; it's the implementations of pack which differ! – tobyink Jun 25 '14 at 11:51
  • Hello, Yes i notice that the issue is in the implementation of the pack function. The problem is that I am coding Perl and the application in the other side is using the PHP method and when I pass data didn't validate. I just have control over the Perl script so I need to find the way to have the same result no matter which of both platforms are well or bad if so. Welch – Welch Jun 25 '14 at 12:48
1

The code doesn't understand how the pack() function actually works. The key is what is different between the PHP and Perl scripts, so let's reduce it to just that calculation. Here's a simpler PHP program:

<?php
  $key = pack('H*', 'THIS_IS_KEY');
  echo $key;
?>

If we echo that into php | hexdump, we get:

00000000 0000 0000 000e

Here's a similar Perl program:

my $key = pack('H*', 'THIS_IS_KEY');
print $key;

And if we echo that into perl | hexdump, we get:

0000000 2cd1 cff2 204e

Those are two significantly different keys. In both cases, the pack() call is using an H* format, which means that pack() is expecting to receive an unbounded hex string (a string containing hexadecimal characters 0-9A-F). The problem is that 'THIS_IS_KEY' is not a sequence of hex values (with the exception of the 'E'). If you run the test code through the php binary itself, you'll also see these lines:

PHP Warning:  pack(): Type H: illegal hex digit T in - on line 2
PHP Warning:  pack(): Type H: illegal hex digit H in - on line 2
PHP Warning:  pack(): Type H: illegal hex digit I in - on line 2
PHP Warning:  pack(): Type H: illegal hex digit S in - on line 2
PHP Warning:  pack(): Type H: illegal hex digit _ in - on line 2
PHP Warning:  pack(): Type H: illegal hex digit I in - on line 2
PHP Warning:  pack(): Type H: illegal hex digit S in - on line 2
PHP Warning:  pack(): Type H: illegal hex digit _ in - on line 2
PHP Warning:  pack(): Type H: illegal hex digit K in - on line 2
PHP Warning:  pack(): Type H: illegal hex digit Y in - on line 2

Note that it's every character except for 'E' that throws an error, and note that in your hex output, every character gets converted to a null nibble except for 'E'. Perl actually tries to make something of nonsense characters and converts them to some sort of representation it can use (e.g. 'K' becomes 4, which kind of makes sense since it's the 5th character after F, which would correspond to 14 in hex). Anyway, it's undefined what the behavior should be passed a string that doesn't match the format.

So, what are your solutions?

Well, if you really need to keep 'THIS_IS_KEY' as your key, then the equivalent Perl key is '000000000E0'. If your example key is only a representation of the key value, generally replace the non-hex characters from the PHP key with '0' in the Perl script. PHP appears to be treating non-hex characters as '0' in the hex string.

As for a real solution, either convert your string key to a hex representation or use a straight hex value as your key before passing to pack(). I don't know the details of the key selection or why the "key" is being packed anyway. The SHA256 portion of the code just takes a byte-string as the key. It could be a straight ASCII key as far as it's concerned, as long as both scripts use the same sequence of bytes.

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