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I am trying to execute SQl Scripts cotaining GO Statements with following code

SqlConnection sqlConnection = new SqlConnection(RConnString);
ServerConnection svrConnection = new ServerConnection(sqlConnection);
Server server = new Server(svrConnection);
returnvalue = server.ConnectionContext.ExecuteNonQuery(strSpScript);
return Convert.ToString(returnvalue);

But it throws following excetpion on live. this code works fine in my local pc

Exception has been thrown by the target of an invocation. at System.RuntimeMethodHandle.InvokeMethod(Object target, Object[] arguments, Signature sig, Boolean constructor) at System.Reflection.RuntimeMethodInfo.UnsafeInvokeInternal(Object obj, Object[] parameters, Object[] arguments) at System.Reflection.RuntimeMethodInfo.Invoke(Object obj, BindingFlags invokeAttr, Binder binder, Object[] parameters, CultureInfo culture) at System.RuntimeType.InvokeMember(String name, BindingFlags bindingFlags, Binder binder, Object target, Object[] providedArgs, ParameterModifier[] modifiers, CultureInfo culture, String[] namedParams) at Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Common.ServerConnection.GetStatements(String query, ExecutionTypes executionType, Int32& statementsToReverse) at Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Common.ServerConnection.ExecuteNonQuery(String sqlCommand, ExecutionTypes executionType) at Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Common.ServerConnection.ExecuteNonQuery(String sqlCommand)

  • what's your sql code ? – NeedAnswers Jun 25 '14 at 6:39
  • there is a sql script of sp with go statements in sql code – Sagar Modi Jun 25 '14 at 6:40
  • yes and it works – Sagar Modi Jun 25 '14 at 6:43
  • GO is a command that client tools are meant to use to know to split the script into separate batches and send the batches to SQL Server individually. You're acting in the role of a client tool now so it's up to your code to perform that same task - find the GOs (being careful around quoted and commented text) - and execute each batch separately. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Jun 25 '14 at 6:48
2

Use code like the following:

using (var connection = new SqlConnection(RConnString)) 
{
    connection.Open();
    foreach (var batch in strSpScript.Split(new string[] {"\nGO", "\ngo"}, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries))
    {
         try
         {
             new SqlCommand(batch, connection).ExecuteNonQuery();
         }
         catch (Exception ex)
         {
             Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
             throw;
         }
    }
}

This will only work if you have 'GO' on a newline (and in consistent case) - modify as necessary.

  • To be consistent with the other client tools, you would need to also avoid splitting the code when GO exists within a multi-line comment or a multi-line string literal – Damien_The_Unbeliever Jun 25 '14 at 6:59
  • as i have to split Sps and execute in loop, for more secure i can use some unique code in new line like 'GO##' and split with it – Sagar Modi Jun 25 '14 at 7:20
  • @Damien_The_Unbeliever - yes, it's not good general purpose code, but if you want something quick & dirty that doesn't involve writing a parser, and you control the input, this will do the job. – Sam Jun 25 '14 at 8:00
  • @Sagar yes, this will work, but the advantage of using GO is that your scripts are then portable across different clients, so for example you can open your script in Management Studio for debugging. – Sam Jun 25 '14 at 8:02
6

GO does not exist in T-SQL. It is a feature of tools like SQL Server Management Studio, not the language itself. Instead, you should locate any GO, and split the command there, executing them separately. Alternatively, refactor your T-SQL to work without GO - in many cases, EXEC can help here.

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