212

How can I format a float so that it doesn't contain trailing zeros? In other words, I want the resulting string to be as short as possible.

For example:

3 -> "3"
3. -> "3"
3.0 -> "3"
3.1 -> "3.1"
3.14 -> "3.14"
3.140 -> "3.14"
6
  • 1
    That example doesn't make any sense at all. 3.14 == 3.140 -- They're the same floating point number. For that matter 3.140000 is the same floating-point number. The zero doesn't exist in the first place.
    – S.Lott
    Mar 14 '10 at 1:08
  • 50
    @S.Lott - I think the issue is PRINTING the float number without the trailing zeros, not the actual equivalence of two numbers.
    – pokstad
    Mar 14 '10 at 1:14
  • 1
    @pokstad: In which case, there's no "superfluous" zero. %0.2f and %0.3f are the two formats required to produce the last numbers on the left. Use %0.2f to produce the last two numbers on the right.
    – S.Lott
    Mar 14 '10 at 1:16
  • 6
    3.0 -> "3" is still a valid use case. print( '{:,g}'.format( X ) worked for me to output 3 where X = 6 / 2 and when X = 5 / 2 I got an output of 2.5 as expected.
    – ShoeMaker
    Feb 27 '16 at 23:51
  • 2
    old question, but.. print("%s"%3.140) gives you what you want. (I added an answer down down below...)
    – drevicko
    Apr 5 '18 at 11:55

20 Answers 20

211

Me, I'd do ('%f' % x).rstrip('0').rstrip('.') -- guarantees fixed-point formatting rather than scientific notation, etc etc. Yeah, not as slick and elegant as %g, but, it works (and I don't know how to force %g to never use scientific notation;-).

14
  • 6
    The only problem with that is '%.2f' % -0.0001 will leave you with -0.00 and ultimately -0.
    – Kos
    Dec 7 '12 at 13:14
  • 3
    @alexanderlukanin13 because the default precision is 6, see docs.python.org/2/library/string.html: 'f' Fixed point. Displays the number as a fixed-point number. The default precision is 6. You would have to use '%0.7f' in the above solution.
    – derenio
    Aug 31 '15 at 16:55
  • 3
    @derenio Good point :-) I can only add that raising precision above '%0.15f' is a bad idea, because weird stuff starts to happen. Sep 1 '15 at 15:38
  • 2
    In case you're in a middle of some other string: print('In the middle {} and something else'.format('{:f}'.format(a).rstrip('0'))) Apr 28 '18 at 8:10
  • 2
    @Peter Schorn: you're right that Gabriel Staples's optimization is bad, but it's because the OP's trick requires you to remove all zeroes THEN all decimals and then NOT MORE ZEROS. Gabriel's approach just removes all zeros and periods until it hits something else. May 11 '20 at 14:47
183

You could use %g to achieve this:

'%g'%(3.140)

or, with Python ≥ 2.6:

'{0:g}'.format(3.140)

or, with Python ≥ 3.6:

f'{3.140:g}'

From the docs for format: g causes (among other things)

insignificant trailing zeros [to be] removed from the significand, and the decimal point is also removed if there are no remaining digits following it.

4
  • 41
    Oh, almost! Sometimes it formats the float in scientific notation ("2.342E+09") - is it possible to turn it off, i.e. always show all significant digits?
    – TarGz
    Mar 14 '10 at 0:46
  • 6
    Why use '{0:...}'.format(value) when you could use format(value, '...')? That avoids having to parse out the format specifier from a template string that is otherwise empty.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Aug 11 '16 at 9:00
  • 2
    @MartijnPieters: The miniscule cost of parsing out the format specifier is swamped by other overhead AFAICT; in practice, my local benchmarks on 3.6 (with function scoping of the microbenchmark to accurately model real code) have format(v, '2.5f') take ~10% longer than '{:2.5f}'.format(v). Even if it didn't, I tend to use the str method form because when I need to tweak it, add additional values to it, etc., there is less to change. Of course, as of 3.6 we have f-strings for most purposes. :-) Aug 25 '18 at 2:12
  • 8
    In Python 3.6, this can be shortened to f"{var:g}" where var is a float variable. Sep 24 '19 at 15:15
23

After looking over answers to several similar questions, this seems to be the best solution for me:

def floatToString(inputValue):
    return ('%.15f' % inputValue).rstrip('0').rstrip('.')

My reasoning:

%g doesn't get rid of scientific notation.

>>> '%g' % 0.000035
'3.5e-05'

15 decimal places seems to avoid strange behavior and has plenty of precision for my needs.

>>> ('%.15f' % 1.35).rstrip('0').rstrip('.')
'1.35'
>>> ('%.16f' % 1.35).rstrip('0').rstrip('.')
'1.3500000000000001'

I could have used format(inputValue, '.15f'). instead of '%.15f' % inputValue, but that is a bit slower (~30%).

I could have used Decimal(inputValue).normalize(), but this has a few issues as well. For one, it is A LOT slower (~11x). I also found that although it has pretty great precision, it still suffers from precision loss when using normalize().

>>> Decimal('0.21000000000000000000000000006').normalize()
Decimal('0.2100000000000000000000000001')
>>> Decimal('0.21000000000000000000000000006')
Decimal('0.21000000000000000000000000006')

Most importantly, I would still be converting to Decimal from a float which can make you end up with something other than the number you put in there. I think Decimal works best when the arithmetic stays in Decimal and the Decimal is initialized with a string.

>>> Decimal(1.35)
Decimal('1.350000000000000088817841970012523233890533447265625')
>>> Decimal('1.35')
Decimal('1.35')

I'm sure the precision issue of Decimal.normalize() can be adjusted to what is needed using context settings, but considering the already slow speed and not needing ridiculous precision and the fact that I'd still be converting from a float and losing precision anyway, I didn't think it was worth pursuing.

I'm not concerned with the possible "-0" result since -0.0 is a valid floating point number and it would probably be a rare occurrence anyway, but since you did mention you want to keep the string result as short as possible, you could always use an extra conditional at very little extra speed cost.

def floatToString(inputValue):
    result = ('%.15f' % inputValue).rstrip('0').rstrip('.')
    return '0' if result == '-0' else result
4
  • 1
    Unfortunately only works with numbers with fewer than roughly) five or more digits to the left of the decimal place. floatToString(12345.6) returns '12345.600000000000364' for example. Decreasing the 15 in %.15f to a lower number solves it in this example, but that value needs to be decreased more and more as the number gets larger. It could be dynamically calculated based on the log-base-10 of the number, but that quickly becomes very complicated.
    – JohnSpeeks
    Mar 29 '17 at 3:21
  • 1
    One way to solve that problem might be to limit the length of the whole number (rather than just the digits after the decimal): result = ('%15f' % val).rstrip('0').rstrip('.').lstrip(' ') Jul 6 '18 at 17:08
  • @JohnSpeeks I'm not sure this is avoidable. It is a side effect of floating numbers not being able to represent the accuracy if more digits are required on the left side. From what I can tell, the number that comes out as a string is the same number that goes in as a float, or at least the closest representation of it. >>>12345.600000000000364 == 12345.6 True
    – PolyMesh
    Mar 7 '19 at 0:26
  • I wrote another solution.
    – niitsuma
    Jun 10 '20 at 3:27
12

What about trying the easiest and probably most effective approach? The method normalize() removes all the rightmost trailing zeros.

from decimal import Decimal

print (Decimal('0.001000').normalize())
# Result: 0.001

Works in Python 2 and Python 3.

-- Updated --

The only problem as @BobStein-VisiBone pointed out, is that numbers like 10, 100, 1000... will be displayed in exponential representation. This can be easily fixed using the following function instead:

from decimal import Decimal


def format_float(f):
    d = Decimal(str(f));
    return d.quantize(Decimal(1)) if d == d.to_integral() else d.normalize()
1
  • 2
    Except Decimal('10.0').normalize() becomes '1E+1'
    – Bob Stein
    Feb 12 '17 at 15:21
11

Here's a solution that worked for me. It's a blend of the solution by PolyMesh and use of the new .format() syntax.

for num in 3, 3., 3.0, 3.1, 3.14, 3.140:
    print('{0:.2f}'.format(num).rstrip('0').rstrip('.'))

Output:

3
3
3
3.1
3.14
3.14
4
  • Only thing wrong with this one is that you have to set a sensible number of decimal digits. The higher you set it, the more precise numbers you can represent, but if you do this a lot, it can degrade performance.
    – beruic
    Jun 29 '17 at 12:10
  • 1
    Adding to beruic's comment, this doesn't work for floats of greater precision (e.g. 3.141) as the .2f is hard-coded.
    – TrebledJ
    Jun 6 '19 at 5:47
  • result = "{:.{}f}".format(float(format(number).rstrip('0').rstrip('.')), precision), fixes that issue TrebledJ. Mar 5 at 6:17
  • great for a one liner one use application with no extra libraries Apr 25 at 11:28
4

You can simply use format() to achieve this:

format(3.140, '.10g') where 10 is the precision you want.

4

While formatting is likely that most Pythonic way, here is an alternate solution using the more_itertools.rstrip tool.

import more_itertools as mit


def fmt(num, pred=None):
    iterable = str(num)
    predicate = pred if pred is not None else lambda x: x in {".", "0"}
    return "".join(mit.rstrip(iterable, predicate))

assert fmt(3) == "3"
assert fmt(3.) == "3"
assert fmt(3.0) == "3"
assert fmt(3.1) == "3.1"
assert fmt(3.14) == "3.14"
assert fmt(3.140) == "3.14"
assert fmt(3.14000) == "3.14"
assert fmt("3,0", pred=lambda x: x in set(",0")) == "3"

The number is converted to a string, which is stripped of trailing characters that satisfy a predicate. The function definition fmt is not required, but it is used here to test assertions, which all pass. Note: it works on string inputs and accepts optional predicates.

See also details on this third-party library, more_itertools.

1
  • Most of the solutions here (including this one) totally forget about integers ending in 0 which is an unwanted behavior. Sep 12 at 4:30
2
>>> str(a if a % 1 else int(a))
3
  • Don't you mean int(a) if a % 1 else a?
    – beruic
    Jun 29 '17 at 12:03
  • Dear Beruic, your answer results negative answer. a if a % 1 else int(a) is correct. Question needs output in string , So I just added str
    – Shameem
    Jun 29 '17 at 14:35
  • Ah, I get it now. a % 1 is truthy because it is non-zero. I implicitly and wrongly perceived it as a % 1 == 0.
    – beruic
    Jun 29 '17 at 15:17
2

if you want something that works both on numeric or string input:

def num(s):
    """ 3.0 -> 3, 3.001000 -> 3.001 otherwise return s """
    s = str(s)
    try:
        int(float(s))
        return s.rstrip('0').rstrip('.')
    except ValueError:
        return s

>>> for n in [3, 3., 3.0, 3.1, 3.14, 3.140, 3.001000 ]: print(num(n))
... 
3
3
3
3.1
3.14
3.14
3.001

>>> for n in [3, 3., 3.0, 3.1, 3.14, 3.140, 3.001000 ]: print(num(str(n)))
... 
3
3
3
3.1
3.14
3.14
3.001
0
1

Using the QuantiPhy package is an option. Normally QuantiPhy is used when working with numbers with units and SI scale factors, but it has a variety of nice number formatting options.

    >>> from quantiphy import Quantity

    >>> cases = '3 3. 3.0 3.1 3.14 3.140 3.14000'.split()
    >>> for case in cases:
    ...    q = Quantity(case)
    ...    print(f'{case:>7} -> {q:p}')
          3 -> 3
         3. -> 3
        3.0 -> 3
        3.1 -> 3.1
       3.14 -> 3.14
      3.140 -> 3.14
    3.14000 -> 3.14

And it will not use e-notation in this situation:

    >>> cases = '3.14e-9 3.14 3.14e9'.split()
    >>> for case in cases:
    ...    q = Quantity(case)
    ...    print(f'{case:>7} -> {q:,p}')
    3.14e-9 -> 0
       3.14 -> 3.14
     3.14e9 -> 3,140,000,000

An alternative you might prefer is to use SI scale factors, perhaps with units.

    >>> cases = '3e-9 3.14e-9 3 3.14 3e9 3.14e9'.split()
    >>> for case in cases:
    ...    q = Quantity(case, 'm')
    ...    print(f'{case:>7} -> {q}')
       3e-9 -> 3 nm
    3.14e-9 -> 3.14 nm
          3 -> 3 m
       3.14 -> 3.14 m
        3e9 -> 3 Gm
     3.14e9 -> 3.14 Gm
1

Here's the answer:

import numpy

num1 = 3.1400
num2 = 3.000
numpy.format_float_positional(num1, 3, trim='-')
numpy.format_float_positional(num2, 3, trim='-')

output "3.14" and "3"

trim='-' removes both the trailing zero's, and the decimal.

1
  • Using GIANT library to achieve only single feature is not wise. Apr 13 at 23:27
0

OP would like to remove superflouous zeros and make the resulting string as short as possible.

I find the %g exponential formatting shortens the resulting string for very large and very small values. The problem comes for values that don't need exponential notation, like 128.0, which is neither very large or very small.

Here is one way to format numbers as short strings that uses %g exponential notation only when Decimal.normalize creates strings that are too long. This might not be the fastest solution (since it does use Decimal.normalize)

def floatToString (inputValue, precision = 3):
    rc = str(Decimal(inputValue).normalize())
    if 'E' in rc or len(rc) > 5:
        rc = '{0:.{1}g}'.format(inputValue, precision)        
    return rc

inputs = [128.0, 32768.0, 65536, 65536 * 2, 31.5, 1.000, 10.0]

outputs = [floatToString(i) for i in inputs]

print(outputs)

# ['128', '32768', '65536', '1.31e+05', '31.5', '1', '10']
0

For float you could use this:

def format_float(num):
    return ('%i' if num == int(num) else '%s') % num

Test it:

>>> format_float(1.00000)
'1'
>>> format_float(1.1234567890000000000)
'1.123456789'

For Decimal see solution here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/42668598/5917543

0

If you can live with 3. and 3.0 appearing as "3.0", a very simple approach that right-strips zeros from float representations:

print("%s"%3.140)

(thanks @ellimilial for pointing out the exceptions)

1
  • 1
    But print("%s"%3.0) does.
    – ellimilial
    Apr 25 '18 at 12:44
0

Try this and it will allow you to add a "precision" variable to set how many decimal places you want. Just remember that it will round up. Please note that this will only work if there is a decimal in the string.

 number = 4.364004650000000
 precision = 2
 result = "{:.{}f}".format(float(format(number).rstrip('0').rstrip('.')), precision)

Output

 4.364004650000000
 4.36
-1

Use %g with big enough width, for example '%.99g'. It will print in fixed-point notation for any reasonably big number.

EDIT: it doesn't work

>>> '%.99g' % 0.0000001
'9.99999999999999954748111825886258685613938723690807819366455078125e-08'
1
  • 1
    .99 is precision, not width; kinda useful but you don't get to set the actual precision this way (other than truncating it yourself).
    – Kos
    Dec 7 '12 at 13:11
-1

You can use max() like this:

print(max(int(x), x))

2
  • 1
    you have to consider the case where x is negative. if x < 0: print(min(x), x) else : print(max(x), x) Sep 29 '18 at 11:19
  • A useful method when I want to do json stringify. float 1.0 change to int 1, so it perform just same as in javascript.
    – pingze
    Apr 18 '19 at 10:02
-1

"{:.5g}".format(x)

I use this to format floats to trail zeros.

1
  • 1
    3143.93 --> 3.1e+03
    – j35t3r
    Jun 24 '20 at 18:09
-3

You can achieve that in most pythonic way like that:

python3:

"{:0.0f}".format(num)
1
  • You're right. The easiest way is to use "{:g}".format(num)
    – Pyglouthon
    Sep 8 '19 at 7:03
-6

Handling %f and you should put

%.2f

, where: .2f == .00 floats.

Example:

print "Price: %.2f" % prices[product]

output:

Price: 1.50

1
  • 2
    This is clearly stated not what the question wants. Need to downvote. May 12 '19 at 21:23

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