1330

I have a class that contains an enum property, and upon serializing the object using JavaScriptSerializer, my json result contains the integer value of the enumeration rather than its string "name". Is there a way to get the enum as a string in my json without having to create a custom JavaScriptConverter? Perhaps there's an attribute that I could decorate the enum definition, or object property, with?

As an example:

enum Gender { Male, Female }

class Person
{
    int Age { get; set; }
    Gender Gender { get; set; }
}

Desired JSON result:

{ "Age": 35, "Gender": "Male" }

Ideally looking for answer with built-in .NET framework classes, if not possible alternatives (like Json.net) are welcome.

1
  • 8
    Change to which? The highest upvoted answer doesn't actually answer the question - yes it is useful in other contexts, hence the votes, but it is of no practicable use whatsoever if you are stuck with the MS JavaScriptSerializer, as essentially you are if using page methods and, most importantly, as required by the question. The accepted answer says its not possible. My answer whilst a bit of a hack gets the job done. Jun 6, 2015 at 9:21

30 Answers 30

2288

I have found that Json.NET provides the exact functionality I'm looking for with a StringEnumConverter attribute:

using Newtonsoft.Json;
using Newtonsoft.Json.Converters;

[JsonConverter(typeof(StringEnumConverter))]
public Gender Gender { get; set; }

More details at available on StringEnumConverter documentation.

There are other places to configure this converter more globally:

  • enum itself if you want enum always be serialized/deserialized as string:

    [JsonConverter(typeof(StringEnumConverter))]  
    enum Gender { Male, Female }
    
  • In case anyone wants to avoid attribute decoration, you can add the converter to your JsonSerializer (suggested by Bjørn Egil):

    serializer.Converters.Add(new Newtonsoft.Json.Converters.StringEnumConverter()); 
    

    and it will work for every enum it sees during that serialization (suggested by Travis).

  • or JsonConverter (suggested by banana):

    JsonConvert.SerializeObject(MyObject, 
        new Newtonsoft.Json.Converters.StringEnumConverter());
    

Additionally you can control casing and whether numbers are still accepted by using StringEnumConverter(NamingStrategy, Boolean) constructor.

9
  • 9
    Follow by link for description how to use it in asp.net mvc application james.newtonking.com/archive/2008/10/16/…
    – RredCat
    Nov 29, 2010 at 8:22
  • 2
    Here is the link to that function: james.newtonking.com/projects/json/help/html/…
    – CAD bloke
    Nov 1, 2011 at 1:37
  • 65
    HttpConfiguration config = GlobalConfiguration.Configuration; config.Formatters.JsonFormatter.SerializerSettings.Formatting = Newtonsoft.Json.Formatting.Indented; config.Formatters.JsonFormatter.SerializerSettings.Converters.Add (new Newtonsoft.Json.Converters.StringEnumConverter());
    – Iggy
    Aug 9, 2013 at 18:03
  • 1
    It is useful to note by default ASP.NET MVC doesn't use Json.Net as json serializer and one need to either extend Controller or manually override every serialization.
    – Odys
    Feb 18, 2014 at 22:58
  • 3
    You can customize the converter (say, for camelCase output): new StringEnumConverter { CamelCaseText = true }
    – Seafish
    Oct 8, 2017 at 15:56
450

No there is no special attribute you can use. JavaScriptSerializer serializes enums to their numeric values and not their string representation. You would need to use custom serialization to serialize the enum as its name instead of numeric value.


If you can use JSON.Net instead of JavaScriptSerializer than see answer on this question provided by OmerBakhari: JSON.net covers this use case (via the attribute [JsonConverter(typeof(StringEnumConverter))]) and many others not handled by the built in .net serializers. Here is a link comparing features and functionalities of the serializers.

5
  • 8
    @Fabzter -- your solution worked with me using Newtonsoft's Json
    – BeemerGuy
    May 12, 2016 at 13:49
  • 1
    @BornToCode Json.NET is the serializer that ASP.NET uses by default. Sep 21, 2016 at 14:21
  • 13
    @BrainSlugs83 - The question was about using JavaScriptSerializer, not Json.NET (and if you look at the revisions history you'll see that there was an edit to clarify that), if you use JavaScriptSerializer the attribute JsonConverter is not going to work.
    – BornToCode
    Sep 21, 2016 at 15:36
  • 1
    "Json.NET is the serializer that ASP.NET uses by default" -- This was not true when the question was asked or answered. (but the most important thing is the clarity of the answer) Jun 9, 2020 at 14:33
  • [JsonConverter(typeof(StringEnumConverter))] is for newtonsoft
    – Noman_1
    Jun 3, 2021 at 12:55
180

Add the below to your global.asax for JSON serialization of c# enum as string

  HttpConfiguration config = GlobalConfiguration.Configuration;
            config.Formatters.JsonFormatter.SerializerSettings.Formatting =
                Newtonsoft.Json.Formatting.Indented;

            config.Formatters.JsonFormatter.SerializerSettings.Converters.Add
                (new Newtonsoft.Json.Converters.StringEnumConverter());
6
  • 4
    For some reason, I'm not getting this to work. Fiddler shows a stubborn 2 rather than 'Warning', even with this in place. Also - any reason why to change the Formatting to Indented?
    – sq33G
    Dec 23, 2013 at 21:03
  • 5
    The third line from this example was added to the App_start/webapiconfig.cs file and did a trick for me in an ASP.NET Web API 2.1 project to return strings for enum values in REST (json fomat) calls.
    – Greg Z.
    Mar 21, 2014 at 17:27
  • 1
    Is there a way to Set this property only per Request Scope? Mar 31, 2016 at 23:16
  • @AnestisKivranoglou just make use a custom json serializer per request with it's own settings. Sep 21, 2016 at 14:19
  • 3
    the first serializer setting of indented is unrelated to the op question. Dec 9, 2016 at 18:06
175

@Iggy answer sets JSON serialization of c# enum as string only for ASP.NET (Web API and so).

But to make it work also with ad hoc serialization, add following to your start class (like Global.asax Application_Start)

//convert Enums to Strings (instead of Integer) globally
JsonConvert.DefaultSettings = (() =>
{
    var settings = new JsonSerializerSettings();
    settings.Converters.Add(new StringEnumConverter { CamelCaseText = true });
    return settings;
});

More information on the Json.NET page

Additionally, to have your enum member to serialize/deserialize to/from specific text, use the

System.Runtime.Serialization.EnumMember

attribute, like this:

public enum time_zone_enum
{
    [EnumMember(Value = "Europe/London")] 
    EuropeLondon,

    [EnumMember(Value = "US/Alaska")] 
    USAlaska
}
3
  • 12
    Thank you! I was just looking for [EnumMember].
    – Poulad
    Sep 16, 2017 at 12:11
  • 1
    The CamelCaseText property is now marked obsolete. New way to instantiate the converter: new StringEnumConverter(new CamelCaseNamingStrategy())
    – fiat
    Aug 14, 2019 at 0:17
  • the JsonConvert you place in ConfigureServices or in Configure in NET CORE 2? Nov 10, 2020 at 21:17
45

I wasn't able to change the source model like in the top answer (of @ob.), and I didn't want to register it globally like @Iggy. So I combined https://stackoverflow.com/a/2870420/237091 and @Iggy's https://stackoverflow.com/a/18152942/237091 to allow setting up the string enum converter on during the SerializeObject command itself:

Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert.SerializeObject(
    objectToSerialize, 
    Newtonsoft.Json.Formatting.None, 
    new Newtonsoft.Json.JsonSerializerSettings()
    {
        Converters = new List<Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConverter> {
            new Newtonsoft.Json.Converters.StringEnumConverter()
        }
    })
2
  • 1
    this also woks nice if you have a property like this List<someEnumType>
    – Bogdan
    Sep 14, 2014 at 16:18
  • As @Bogdan mentioned, this was the fix for me to make a List<AnEnumType> property serialize with the string value of each Enum value instead of the number value. Feb 15, 2021 at 22:51
42

In .net core 3 this is now possible with the built-in classes in System.Text.Json (edit: System.Text.Json is also available as a NuGet package for .net core 2.0 and .net framework 4.7.2 and later versions according to the docs):

var person = new Person();
// Create and add a converter which will use the string representation instead of the numeric value.
var stringEnumConverter = new System.Text.Json.Serialization.JsonStringEnumConverter();
JsonSerializerOptions opts = new JsonSerializerOptions();
opts.Converters.Add(stringEnumConverter);
// Generate json string.
var json = JsonSerializer.Serialize<Person>(person, opts);

To configure JsonStringEnumConverter with attribute decoration for the specific property:

using System.Text.Json.Serialization;

[JsonConverter(typeof(JsonStringEnumConverter))]
public Gender Gender { get; set; }

If you want to always convert the enum as string, put the attribute at the enum itself.

[JsonConverter(typeof(JsonStringEnumConverter))] 
enum Gender { Male, Female }
1
  • 1
    Nice and clean.
    – jolySoft
    Jun 9, 2021 at 13:27
39

The combination of Omer Bokhari and uri 's answers is alsways my solution since the values that I want to provide is usually different from what I have in my enum specially that I would like to be able to change my enums if I need to.

So if anyone is interested, it is something like this:

public enum Gender
{
   [EnumMember(Value = "male")] 
   Male,
   [EnumMember(Value = "female")] 
   Female
}

class Person
{
    int Age { get; set; }
    [JsonConverter(typeof(StringEnumConverter))]
    Gender Gender { get; set; }
}
1
  • 2
    I was using JsonPropertyAttribute for enum members and it is working for simple deserializtion tasks. Sadly, during manual tweaks with JTokens it gets ignored. Happilly EnumMemberAttribute works like a charm. Thanks!
    – Prolog
    Nov 17, 2018 at 22:21
33

ASP.NET Core way:

public class Startup
{
  public IServiceProvider ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
  {
    services.AddMvc().AddJsonOptions(options =>
    {
      options.SerializerSettings.Converters.Add(new Newtonsoft.Json.Converters.StringEnumConverter());
    });
  }
}

https://gist.github.com/regisdiogo/27f62ef83a804668eb0d9d0f63989e3e

0
31

This is easily done by adding a ScriptIgnore attribute to the Gender property, causing it to not be serialised, and adding a GenderString property which does get serialised:

class Person
{
    int Age { get; set; }

    [ScriptIgnore]
    Gender Gender { get; set; }

    string GenderString { get { return Gender.ToString(); } }
}
13
  • 32
    Let me try to explain. This solution isn't correct according to design paters. You modified the model according to view purpose. But model has to contain data only and doesn't care about presentations. You have to move this functionality on the other layer.
    – RredCat
    Apr 17, 2013 at 13:52
  • 4
    Actually, Model is used to pass data from controller, ant it is controller, who does not care about presentation. Introduction of automated property (GenderString here) does not break controller, which still uses Gender property, but provides easy access for a view. Logical solution.
    – Dima
    Jul 16, 2013 at 9:12
  • 17
    @RredCat There is nothing wrong with having view-specific properties in the "view model". IMHO the mistake would be not to split the view model from the domain model: blogs.msdn.com/b/simonince/archive/2010/01/26/… Aug 23, 2013 at 17:46
  • 5
    @RredCat, even if it were incorrect according to some pattern, the OP says nothing about this, so this is indeed a correct answer. (Even if I philosophically may agree with your point.)
    – MEMark
    Nov 4, 2013 at 9:11
  • 10
    The pedantically absurd bike-shedding in this comment thread is fascinating. Jul 22, 2015 at 1:12
27

This version of Stephen's answer doesn't change the name in the JSON:

[DataContract(
    Namespace = 
       "http://schemas.datacontract.org/2004/07/Whatever")]
class Person
{
    [DataMember]
    int Age { get; set; }

    Gender Gender { get; set; }

    [DataMember(Name = "Gender")]
    string GenderString
    {
        get { return this.Gender.ToString(); }
        set 
        { 
            Gender g; 
            this.Gender = Enum.TryParse(value, true, out g) ? g : Gender.Male; 
        }
    }
}
4
  • 3
    I believe this is valid for the DataContractJsonSerializer not JavaScriptSerializer
    – KCD
    Oct 31, 2012 at 7:46
  • 1
    Simple and solves the problem for me using native .NET framework serializers. Aug 7, 2013 at 20:40
  • 1
    best solution for me as I am not allowed to use 3rd party libraries (ISO complience issues) Oct 17, 2013 at 12:56
  • This isn't for the type of serialiser in the question of course. JavaScriptSerializer serialises everything which isn't ignored, whereas DataContractJsonSerializer requires DataMember attributes. Thanks for the shout out but please note you spelt my name wrong :) Oct 25, 2014 at 12:27
25

Here is the answer for newtonsoft.json

enum Gender { Male, Female }

class Person
{
    int Age { get; set; }

    [JsonConverter(typeof(StringEnumConverter))]
    Gender Gender { get; set; }
}
1
  • 1
    Thank you for this answer, helped me a lot! If you want to define your enums in PascalCase, but you want it to be serialized in camelCase then you need to add true to your JsonConverter type like this: [JsonConverter(typeof(StringEnumConverter), true)]
    – Peet
    Mar 14, 2018 at 13:36
24

Asp.Net Core 3 with System.Text.Json

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{

    services
        .AddControllers()
        .AddJsonOptions(options => 
           options.JsonSerializerOptions.Converters.Add(new JsonStringEnumConverter())
        );

    //...
 }
19

You can also add a converter to your JsonSerializer if you don't want to use JsonConverter attribute:

string SerializedResponse = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(
     objToSerialize, 
     new Newtonsoft.Json.Converters.StringEnumConverter()
); 

It will work for every enum it sees during that serialization.

16

Here is a simple solution that serializes a server-side C# enum to JSON and uses the result to populate a client-side <select> element. This works for both simple enums and bitflag enums.

I have included the end-to-end solution because I think most people wanting to serialize a C# enum to JSON will also probably be using it to fill a <select> drop-down.

Here goes:

Example Enum

public enum Role
{
    None = Permission.None,
    Guest = Permission.Browse,
    Reader = Permission.Browse| Permission.Help ,
    Manager = Permission.Browse | Permission.Help | Permission.Customise
}

A complex enum that uses bitwise ORs to generate a permissions system. So you can't rely on the simple index [0,1,2..] for the integer value of the enum.

Server Side - C#

Get["/roles"] = _ =>
{
    var type = typeof(Role);
    var data = Enum
        .GetNames(type)
        .Select(name => new 
            {
                Id = (int)Enum.Parse(type, name), 
                Name = name 
            })
        .ToArray();

    return Response.AsJson(data);
};

The code above uses the NancyFX framework to handle the Get request. It uses Nancy's Response.AsJson() helper method - but don't worry, you can use any standard JSON formatter as the enum has already been projected into a simple anonymous type ready for serialization.

Generated JSON

[
    {"Id":0,"Name":"None"},
    {"Id":2097155,"Name":"Guest"},
    {"Id":2916367,"Name":"Reader"},
    {"Id":4186095,"Name":"Manager"}
]

Client Side - CoffeeScript

fillSelect=(id, url, selectedValue=0)->
    $select = $ id
    $option = (item)-> $ "<option/>", 
        {
            value:"#{item.Id}"
            html:"#{item.Name}"
            selected:"selected" if item.Id is selectedValue
        }
    $.getJSON(url).done (data)->$option(item).appendTo $select for item in data

$ ->
    fillSelect "#role", "/roles", 2916367

HTML Before

<select id="role" name="role"></select>

HTML After

<select id="role" name="role">
    <option value="0">None</option>
    <option value="2097155">Guest</option>
    <option value="2916367" selected="selected">Reader</option>
    <option value="4186095">Manager</option>
</select>
16

For ASP.Net core Just add the following to your Startup Class:

JsonConvert.DefaultSettings = (() =>
        {
            var settings = new JsonSerializerSettings();
            settings.Converters.Add(new StringEnumConverter { AllowIntegerValues = false });
            return settings;
        });
0
13

You can create JsonSerializerSettings with the call to JsonConverter.SerializeObject as below:

var result = JsonConvert.SerializeObject
            (
                dataObject,
                new JsonSerializerSettings
                {
                    Converters = new [] {new StringEnumConverter()}
                }
            );
12

Noticed that there is no answer for serialization when there is a Description attribute.

Here is my implementation that supports the Description attribute.

public class CustomStringEnumConverter : Newtonsoft.Json.Converters.StringEnumConverter
{
    public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        Type type = value.GetType() as Type;

        if (!type.IsEnum) throw new InvalidOperationException("Only type Enum is supported");
        foreach (var field in type.GetFields())
        {
            if (field.Name == value.ToString())
            {
                var attribute = Attribute.GetCustomAttribute(field, typeof(DescriptionAttribute)) as DescriptionAttribute;
                writer.WriteValue(attribute != null ? attribute.Description : field.Name);

                return;
            }
        }

        throw new ArgumentException("Enum not found");
    }
}

Enum:

public enum FooEnum
{
    // Will be serialized as "Not Applicable"
    [Description("Not Applicable")]
    NotApplicable,

    // Will be serialized as "Applicable"
    Applicable
}

Usage:

[JsonConverter(typeof(CustomStringEnumConverter))]
public FooEnum test { get; set; }
10

For .Net Core :-

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    ...
    services.AddJsonFormatters(f => f.Converters.Add(new StringEnumConverter()));
    ...
}
1
  • 2
    If this is the one from the Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.Formatters.Json NuGet package, it seems to only be an extension method on IMvcCoreBuilder, not IMvcBuilder. So it's used like services.AddMvcCore().AddJsonFormatters(f => f.Converters.Add(new StringEnumConverter()));.
    – infl3x
    Oct 27, 2017 at 8:41
8

Just in case anybody finds the above insufficient, I ended up settling with this overload:

JsonConvert.SerializeObject(objToSerialize, Formatting.Indented, new Newtonsoft.Json.Converters.StringEnumConverter())
1
  • This is a good solution for a current use case of mine: I don't want to change the serializers defaults and I have problems using attributes, because my properties are of type IList<EnumType>. Jun 14, 2019 at 8:48
8

Use this:

using Newtonsoft.Json;
using Newtonsoft.Json.Converters;

[Serializable]
[JsonConverter(typeof(StringEnumConverter))]
public enum Gender { Male, Female }
5

This is an old question but I thought I'd contribute just in case. In my projects I use separate models for any Json requests. A model would typically have same name as domain object with "Json" prefix. Models are mapped using AutoMapper. By having the json model declare a string property that is an enum on domain class, AutoMapper will resolve to it's string presentation.

In case you are wondering, I need separate models for Json serialized classes because inbuilt serializer comes up with circular references otherwise.

Hope this helps someone.

2
  • Nice to learn that feature of Automapper ;-) [ScriptIgnore] attribute will remove circular references
    – ledragon
    Mar 27, 2013 at 16:43
  • 1
    Oh. Didn't know about the attribute. Thanks! Would you use that on your Pocos? I've resorted to using MetadataType definitions for any Poco attributes just to keep them clean. Would the attribute still work via meta data? Apr 5, 2013 at 12:50
4

For .NET 6.0 if you want to use the built-in JsonSerializer (System.Text.Json)

Then, it comes out-of-the-box, you just need to use the built-in JsonStringEnumConverter attribute. For example:

[JsonConverter(typeof(JsonStringEnumConverter))]
public SomeEnumType EnumProperty { get; set; }

And that's it, BUT make sure your SomeEnumType contains values with the exact string values, otherwise it will throw an exception. Casing seems to be insensitive.

Reference: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/standard/serialization/system-text-json-customize-properties?pivots=dotnet-6-0#enums-as-strings

3

You can actually use a JavaScriptConverter to accomplish this with the built-in JavaScriptSerializer. By converting your enum to a Uri you can encode it as a string.

I've described how to do this for dates but it can be used for enums as well. Custom DateTime JSON Format for .NET JavaScriptSerializer.

0
2

A slightly more future-proof option

Facing the same question, we determined that we needed a custom version of StringEnumConverter to make sure that our enum values could expand over time without breaking catastrophically on the deserializing side (see background below). Using the SafeEnumConverter below allows deserialization to finish even if the payload contains a value for the enum that does not have a named definition, closer to how int-to-enum conversion would work.

Usage:

[SafeEnumConverter]
public enum Colors
{
    Red,
    Green,
    Blue,
    Unsupported = -1
}

or

[SafeEnumConverter((int) Colors.Blue)]
public enum Colors
{
    Red,
    Green,
    Blue
}

Source:

public class SafeEnumConverter : StringEnumConverter
{
    private readonly int _defaultValue;

    public SafeEnumConverter()
    {
        // if you've been careful to *always* create enums with `0` reserved
        // as an unknown/default value (which you should), you could use 0 here. 
        _defaultValue = -1;
    }

    public SafeEnumConverter(int defaultValue)
    {
        _defaultValue = defaultValue;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Reads the provided JSON and attempts to convert using StringEnumConverter. If that fails set the value to the default value.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>The deserialized value of the enum if it exists or the default value if it does not.</returns>
    public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        try
        {
            return base.ReadJson(reader, objectType, existingValue, serializer);
        }
        catch
        {
            return Enum.Parse(objectType, $"{_defaultValue}");
        }
    }

    public override bool CanConvert(Type objectType)
    {
        return base.CanConvert(objectType) && objectType.GetTypeInfo().IsEnum;
    }
}

Background

When we looked at using the StringEnumConverter, the problem we had is that we also needed passivity for cases when a new enum value was added, but not every client was immediately aware of the new value. In these cases, the StringEnumConverter packaged with Newtonsoft JSON throws a JsonSerializationException similar to "Error converting value SomeString to type EnumType" and then the whole deserialization process fails. This was a deal breaker for us, because even if the client planned on ignoring/discarding the property value that it didn't understand, it still needed to be capable of deserializing the rest of the payload!

2
  • still relatively new to .NET but I've been told to avoid try catch expressions for performance reasons. Wouldn't a serializer be a bad place to use one if that is the case?
    – laventnc
    Aug 17, 2020 at 14:23
  • 1
    @laventnc The try...catch itself isn't going to impact performance, but if exception is raised, there's performance overhead for that. The point of this implementation is fault tolerance ... not allowing a single unknown enum value to prevent your entire JSON payload from deserializing. Compare the base StringEnumConveter: the exception would still be raised, but it will cause the whole deserialization process to fail (and its likely caught somewhere farther up the stack). Whether you need this kind of fault tolerance is an artifact of your use case(s).
    – Dusty
    Aug 17, 2020 at 14:48
1

Not sure if this is still relevant but I had to write straight to a json file and I came up with the following piecing several stackoverflow answers together

public class LowercaseJsonSerializer
{
    private static readonly JsonSerializerSettings Settings = new JsonSerializerSettings
    {
        ContractResolver = new LowercaseContractResolver()
    };

    public static void Serialize(TextWriter file, object o)
    {
        JsonSerializer serializer = new JsonSerializer()
        {
            ContractResolver = new LowercaseContractResolver(),
            Formatting = Formatting.Indented,
            NullValueHandling = NullValueHandling.Ignore
        };
        serializer.Converters.Add(new Newtonsoft.Json.Converters.StringEnumConverter());
        serializer.Serialize(file, o);
    }

    public class LowercaseContractResolver : DefaultContractResolver
    {
        protected override string ResolvePropertyName(string propertyName)
        {
            return Char.ToLowerInvariant(propertyName[0]) + propertyName.Substring(1);
        }
    }
}

It assures all my json keys are lowercase starting according to json "rules". Formats it cleanly indented and ignores nulls in the output. Aslo by adding a StringEnumConverter it prints enums with their string value.

Personally I find this the cleanest I could come up with, without having to dirty the model with annotations.

usage:

    internal void SaveJson(string fileName)
    {
        // serialize JSON directly to a file
        using (StreamWriter file = File.CreateText(@fileName))
        {
            LowercaseJsonSerializer.Serialize(file, jsonobject);
        }
    }
1

And for VB.net I found the following works:

Dim sec = New Newtonsoft.Json.Converters.StringEnumConverter()
sec.NamingStrategy() = New Serialization.CamelCaseNamingStrategy

Dim JSON_s As New JsonSerializer
JSON_s.Converters.Add(sec)

Dim jsonObject As JObject
jsonObject = JObject.FromObject(SomeObject, JSON_s)
Dim text = jsonObject.ToString

IO.File.WriteAllText(filePath, text)
0

I have put together all of the pieces of this solution using the Newtonsoft.Json library. It fixes the enum issue and also makes the error handling much better, and it works in IIS hosted services. It's quite a lot of code, so you can find it on GitHub here: https://github.com/jongrant/wcfjsonserializer/blob/master/NewtonsoftJsonFormatter.cs

You have to add some entries to your Web.config to get it to work, you can see an example file here: https://github.com/jongrant/wcfjsonserializer/blob/master/Web.config

0

For anyone needing a solution in May of '22 for .NET 6 and still using Newtonsoft, you can register the converter globally like this:

var builder = WebApplication.CreateBuilder(args);
...
builder.Services.AddControllers(options => options.RespectBrowserAcceptHeader = true)
.AddNewtonsoftJson(opt =>
{
    opt.SerializerSettings.ContractResolver = new DefaultContractResolver();
    opt.SerializerSettings.Converters.Add(new Newtonsoft.Json.Converters.StringEnumConverter());
})
.AddXmlSerializerFormatters()
.AddXmlDataContractSerializerFormatters();
-4
        Person p = new Person();
        p.Age = 35;
        p.Gender = Gender.Male;
        //1.  male="Male";
        string male = Gender.Male.ToString();

        p.Gender = Gender.Female;

        //2.  female="Female";
        string female = Enum.GetName(typeof(Gender), p.Gender);

        JObject jobj = new JObject();
        jobj["Age"] = p.Age;
        jobj["Gender"] = male;
        jobj["Gender2"] = female;

        //you result:  josn= {"Age": 35,"Gender": "Male","Gender2": "Female"}
        string json = jobj.ToString();
-5
new JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(  
    (from p   
    in (new List<Person>() {  
        new Person()  
        {  
            Age = 35,  
            Gender = Gender.Male  
        }  
    })  
    select new { Age =p.Age, Gender=p.Gender.ToString() }  
    ).ToArray()[0]  
);

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