2

This question already has an answer here:

var flatten = function (array){
  // TODO: Program me
  var newArray = [];
  for(var i = 0; i<array.length; i++) {
    newArray.push(array[i]);
  }
  return newArray;
}

This are the results excepted:

flatten([1,2,3]) // => [1,2,3]
flatten([[1,2,3],["a","b","c"],[1,2,3]])  // => [1,2,3,"a","b","c",1,2,3]
flatten([[[1,2,3]]]) // => [[1,2,3]]

Test result:

Test Passed

Test Passed

Test Failed: Value is not what was expected
  1. I searched for some heliping function in "Professional JS for Web Developers" but I can't find one for finding the number of dimension of an array.

marked as duplicate by Andy, John Dvorak, VisioN javascript Jun 25 '14 at 16:52

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • This is a great opportunity to learn recursion – Josh Noe Jun 25 '14 at 16:29
  • just check if the inner element is an array – Fabricator Jun 25 '14 at 16:29
  • This is the answer I was looking at from that duplicate. – Andy Jun 25 '14 at 16:32
  • I'm not sure how you claim your 2nd test passed. Your function doesn't actually do anything other than take elements from one array and put them in another. Nothing is flattened. Your output is essentially identical to the input. – James Montagne Jun 25 '14 at 16:40
  • return [].concat.apply([], array); - was the solution. Thanks Andy for topic. – Bacchus Jun 25 '14 at 16:42
7

The trick is that if an element of the input array is an array itself then you should "concat" the element's flattened items into the input array instead of pushing the entire array.

Here is a solution using "reduce" and "Array.isArray(...)" which are only available in newer browsers which support the later specification of ECMAScript 5.1th Edition:

function flatten(array) {
  return array.reduce(function(memo, el) {
    var items = Array.isArray(el) ? flatten(el) : [el];
    return memo.concat(items);
  }, []);
}

flatten([1,2,3])                          // => [1,2,3]
flatten([[1,2,3],["a","b","c"],[1,2,3]])  // => [1,2,3,"a","b","c",1,2,3]
flatten([[[1,2,3]]])                      // => [1, 2, 3]
  • You should note that this code will work only in the newest browsers, that support Array.prototype.reduce and Array.isArray. Otherwise, polyfills must be applied. – VisioN Jun 25 '14 at 16:57
  • @VisioN: indeed, I'm relying heavily on convenient, newer language features =) – maerics Jun 25 '14 at 17:05
1

Here is one possible solution with using recursion:

function flatten(array, result) {
    result === undefined && (result = []);

    for (var i = 0, len = array.length; i < len; i++) {
        if (Object.prototype.toString.call(array[i]) === '[object Array]') {
            flatten(array[i], result);
        } else {
            result.push(array[i]);
        }
    }

    return result;
}

flatten([1,2,3]);
// [1, 2, 3]

flatten([[1,2,3], ["a","b","c"], [1,2,3]]);
// [1, 2, 3, "a", "b", "c", 1, 2, 3]

flatten([[[1,2,3]]]);
// [1, 2, 3]

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/6ZhJ6/

  • 1
    If you look at expected result #3, the intent isn't actually to fully flatten the array but rather just one level. [[[1,2,3]]] becomes [[1,2,3]] and not [1,2,3]. – James Montagne Jun 25 '14 at 16:45
  • @JamesMontagne Not expected but excepted, which probably means the real results, which the OP received from his code, hence last "Test Failed". – VisioN Jun 25 '14 at 16:47
  • Hah, I read that as expected, though I still assume that was what was intended as the results actually returned by the original code are just a copy of what was passed. The function does basically nothing. – James Montagne Jun 25 '14 at 16:49
  • @JamesMontagne Yeah, I know it's confusing, but I have just proposed another solution (apart from the ones in the related question), which seems to be doing what is expected :) – VisioN Jun 25 '14 at 16:51

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