19

The object oriented matplotlib subplots interface is nice, but I am having difficulty using it when calling a function that contains lines like plt.plot(x, y). These functions work with plt.subplot() easily, but is it possible to set the active subplot with a given axes object? Specifically I want something like the following to plot into two seperate subplots:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

x = [0 ,1, 2]
y= [0 ,1 2]

fig, axs = plt.subplots(2,1)

plt.some_function_to_set_active_subplot(axs[0])
plt.plot(x, y)

plt.some_function_to_set_active_subplot(axs[1])
plt.plot(x, y)

Does any such function some_function_to_set_active_subplot exist?

Edit: I specifically cannot use ax.plot, or anything like that. I am basically asking about how to mix the object oriented interface with the matlab style interface.

Edit 2: I don't want to use plt.subplot either. I want to use OO interface for setting up subplots, and matlab-style for the actual plotting.

7
  • What about axs[0].plot(...) ?
    – moooeeeep
    Jun 25 '14 at 19:17
  • 1
    I can't use that. suppose I have some function plotter(x, y) that contains a plt.plot call deep inside, and I can't change the function to call axs[0].plot().
    – nbren12
    Jun 25 '14 at 19:20
  • You might want to change that function to take an additional argument ax then.
    – moooeeeep
    Jun 25 '14 at 19:23
  • agreed, I tend to do this with the code I write personally, but sometimes refactoring is not possible, or desired.
    – nbren12
    Jun 25 '14 at 19:26
  • stackoverflow.com/questions/15858192/… <- related
    – tacaswell
    Jun 25 '14 at 19:32
20

You can use plt.axes to set the current active axes. From the documentation: "axes(h) where h is an axes instance makes h the current axis."

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

x = [0 ,1, 2]
y = [10 ,20, 30]

fig, axs = plt.subplots(2,1)

plt.axes(axs[0])
plt.plot(x,y)
plt.axes(axs[1])
plt.plot(y,x)
plt.show()
4
  • 6
    there is also plt.sca(ax)
    – tacaswell
    Jun 25 '14 at 19:33
  • Thanks @tcaswell! Is plt.sca(ax) better than plt.axes(ax)? (If you have to use either.)
    – Molly
    Jun 25 '14 at 19:36
  • Thanks! this is great. plt.gca -- plt.sca, duh
    – nbren12
    Jun 25 '14 at 19:41
  • 1
    plt.sca is better as is it just sets the current axes. If you use plt.axes does some logic to check if it needs to create an axes. If you look at the source plt.axes uses plt.gcf().sca(ax).
    – tacaswell
    Jun 25 '14 at 19:50
6

The method plt.axes is deprecated for this use. Use plt.sca instead. Following the example above:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

x = [0 ,1, 2]
y = [10 ,20, 30]

fig, axs = plt.subplots(2,1)

plt.sca(axs[0])
plt.plot(x,y)
plt.sca(axs[1])
plt.plot(y,x)
plt.show()

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