1

I mean "structural links" in the HATEOAS/hypermedia API sense. The more general question is how to augment the generated XML with data that depends on both the entity being marshalled, and also on the environment (in this case, at least the absolute URL).

I'm using Jersey 2.9 with Moxy 2.5 as the JAXB provider.

From this model:

package testing;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class Planet {

    private int id = 1;
    private String name = "test";
    private double radius = 3.0;
    private String href;

    private List<Moon> moons = new ArrayList<Moon>(0);

    public void addMoon(Moon moon) {
        moons.add(moon);
    }
}

...plus Moon class

I want to get something like this XML (and the equivalent JSON):

<planet href="http://mytestserver/rest/planets/test">
    <name>test</name>
    <radius>3.0</radius>
    <moons>
        <moon href="http://mytestserver/rest/moons/moon1">
            <name>moon1</name>
        </moon>
        <moon href="http://mytestserver/rest/moons/moon2">
            <name>moon2</name>
        </moon>
    </moons>
</planet>

The model has no "href" field, nor can one be added. Ideally I could use UriBuilder to grab these paths straight from the resource classes.

So far I've come up with several possiblities. Can I ask you to consider which (if any) has the most legs, and then how you would work around the shortcomings of that method?

1. Augment the model with AspectJ (or Javassist).

And then use the existing declarative linking mechanisms in Jersey, all of which rely on there being a field in the model to receive the generated links. This obviously won't work if you don't have AspectJ in your build process and/or balk at exotic techniques like byte code manipulation.

2. Post-process the generated XML and JSON

For example, in a MessageBodyWriter:

ContextResolver<JAXBContext> resolver = providers.getContextResolver(JAXBContext.class, mediaType);
JAXBContext context = resolver.getContext(type);
Marshaller m = context.createMarshaller();
<--- here, marshall to e.g. a DOM then transform that
<--- then manipulate the JSON structures

I have absolutely no idea how to do any of that, hence the lack of code. There may be other ways to hook into the XML generation process, but as far as I can see none of Jersey's or JAXB's event handlers or interceptors actually allow you to manipulate the generated XML/JSON.

3. Use a Moxy XMLTransformationMapping

For example:

XML binding:
<java-type name="Planet" xml-customizer="testing.HrefCustomizer">

Customizer:
public class HrefCustomizer implements DescriptorCustomizer {

    @Override
    public void customize(ClassDescriptor descriptor) throws Exception {
        XMLTransformationMapping xtm = new XMLTransformationMapping();
        xtm.addFieldTransformer("@href", new HrefWriter());

        descriptor.addMapping(xtm);

    }

}

Transformer:
public class HrefWriter implements FieldTransformer {

    @Override
    public Object buildFieldValue(Object instance, String fieldName,
            Session session) {
        return "href";  // constant value just for proof-of-concept
    }

    @Override
    public void initialize(AbstractTransformationMapping mapping) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub

    }

}

I have two problems with this approach:

  1. It was so hard to find any documentation on it that I wonder if it is in fact unsupported usage.
  2. I can't see how the transformer is going to get a UriBuilder to work with. At minimum it would need the root URL of the rest service.

4. Slightly different Moxy xml-transform approach

If we decide we can't provide the transformer with any meaningful context at instantiation time, the customizer is adding no value and we can simplify the above to just this:

    <java-type name="Planet">
        <xml-root-element/>            
        <java-attributes>
            <xml-transformation java-attribute="name">
                <xml-write-transformer transformer-class="testing.HrefWriter" xml-path="@href"/>
            </xml-transformation>
            <xml-element java-attribute="name"/>

With the slight oddity that we are hanging the transformer off another field ("name", in this example).

5. ?????

Or, I'm completely barking up the wrong tree. Help!!

0

AspectJ approach

Synopsis

  • Use AspectJ to add a field to the model classes (called "href" in this example)
  • Add the Jersey @InjectLink annotation to that field
  • Jersey will then populate the field with the right URL as defined by the resource class
  • Specify the marshaling of the href field using an external mapping file.

You could also specify the marshaling of href by adding JAXB annotations to it via the same AspectJ intertype declaration mechanism.

Example code

These are the most informative bits. See http://lagod.id.au/blog/?p=494 for the full example.

The aspect

package testing;

import org.glassfish.jersey.linking.InjectLink;
import org.glassfish.jersey.linking.Binding;

public aspect HrefInjector {

    private String Planet.href;
    declare @field : * Planet.href : @InjectLink(
                                        resource=Services.class, 
                                        style=InjectLink.Style.ABSOLUTE
                                    ) ;

    private String Moon.href;
    declare @field : * Moon.href : @InjectLink(
                                        resource=Services.class,
                                        method="moon",
                                        bindings={@Binding(
                                                name="moonid", value="${instance.name}"
                                                )},
                                        style=InjectLink.Style.ABSOLUTE
                                    ) ;

}

Model classes

POJOs with no REST-specific cruft. See Jersey + Moxy + JAXB - how to marshal XML without annotations.

package testing;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class Planet {

    private int id = 1;
    private String name = "test";
    private double radius = 3.0;

    private List<Moon> moons = new ArrayList<Moon>(0);

    public void addMoon(Moon moon) {
        moons.add(moon);
    }
}


package testing;

public class Moon {

    private String name;

    // No-arg constructor is a requirement of JAXB
    public Moon() {
    }

    public Moon(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

}

Resource class

This is a standard JAX-RS resource class. For demo purposes, we're just returning freshly instantiated model instances.

package testing;

import javax.ws.rs.GET;
import javax.ws.rs.Path;
import javax.ws.rs.PathParam;
import javax.ws.rs.Produces;
import javax.ws.rs.core.MediaType;

@Path("/services")
@Produces({MediaType.APPLICATION_XML,MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON})
public class Services {

    private Planet initPlanet() {
        Planet p = new Planet();
        p.addMoon(new Moon("moon1"));
        p.addMoon(new Moon("moon2"));
        return p;
    }

    @GET
    public Planet planet () {
        return initPlanet();
    }

    @GET @Path("/moons/{moonid}")
    public Moon moon (@PathParam("moonid") String name) {
        return new Moon(name);
    }

}

Moxy mapping file

Note that you can choose for any given type whether or not you want to actually marshal the href field. In fact, by using multiple mapping files, you can include the href field in some representations and not in others.

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<xml-bindings
    xmlns="http://www.eclipse.org/eclipselink/xsds/persistence/oxm"
    package-name="testing"
    xml-mapping-metadata-complete="true"
    xml-accessor-type="NONE">
    <java-types>
        <java-type name="Planet">
            <xml-root-element/>
            <java-attributes>
                <xml-attribute java-attribute="href"/>
                <xml-element java-attribute="name"/>
                <xml-element java-attribute="radius"/>
                <xml-element java-attribute="moons" name="moon">
                    <xml-element-wrapper name="moons"/>
                </xml-element>    
            </java-attributes>
        </java-type>
        <java-type name="Moon">
            <xml-root-element/>
            <java-attributes>
                <xml-attribute java-attribute="href"/>
                <xml-element java-attribute="name"/>
            </java-attributes>
        </java-type>
    </java-types>
</xml-bindings>

Sample output

Ta-dah! Structural links derived automatically from the JAX-RS resource class without altering model source code. Because we're using Moxy, we also get JSON for free.

<planet href="http://localhost:8080/reststructlinks/rest/services">
    <name>test</name>
    <radius>3.0</radius>
    <moons>
        <moon href="http://localhost:8080/reststructlinks/rest/services/moons/moon1">
            <name>moon1</name>
        </moon>
        <moon href="http://localhost:8080/reststructlinks/rest/services/moons/moon2">
            <name>moon2</name>
        </moon>
    </moons>
</planet>

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