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In the penultimate lecture of his Coursera course, Prof. Odersky offered the following for comprehension as the final step in a lovely case study:

def solutions(target: Int): Stream[Path] =
  for {
    pathSet <- pathSets
    path <- pathSet
    if path.endState contains target
  } yield path

In an earlier lecture he drew some analogies between for comprehensions and SQL.

What I'm looking for is a way to yield only those paths that have a DISTINCT endState.

Is there a way to refer back from within a filter clause of the same comprehension to the items that have already been yielded?

Another approach might be to convert pathSets to a Map from endState to path before the for statement, then convert it back to a Stream before returning it. However, this would seem to lose the lazy computation benefits of using a Stream.

An earlier method from the same case study accomplished similar goals, but it was already a recursive function, while this one doesn't (seem to) need to be recursive.

It looks like I could use a mutable Set to track the endStates that get yielded, but that feels unsatisfying, since the course has successfully avoided using mutability so far.

  • 1
    You could use a recursive Stream definition but you couldn't use a for-comprehension then of course... – Erik Kaplun Jun 27 '14 at 22:19
  • 2
    Using mutable.Set would indeed be easy and efficient. Why does it trouble you so much? map and flatMap are also implemented with mutability, even though you use them with that for. So there is mutability in your function anyways, but an outsider has no power to use that mutability and that is what matters. It can also make your code more readable. mutability is not the devil :) – Kigyo Jun 28 '14 at 7:33
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    Would you be able to use the distinct method of Stream à la this post? – wwkudu Jun 30 '14 at 14:34
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    If you've done the last assignment of the course, if I remember correctly there was a function where exactly this action was to be implemented, and it was done using an accumulator that contained end states seen so far and a helper function that filtered based on that. It's very much doable. – Aakash Jain Jul 1 '14 at 2:13
  • 2
    There's no need to add native support for distinct, and one of the main ideas of Scala is that you should be able to write the extensions you need in the language itself and they will look like primitives of the language. If you want to be fully immutable you need some kind of state monad transformer composed with the Stream monad – GClaramunt Jul 12 '14 at 4:24
1

Is there a way to refer back from within a filter clause of the same comprehension to the items that have already been yielded?

Your for comprehension desugars to something more or less like

pathSets flatMap {
  pathSet => pathSet filter {
   path => path.endState contains target
  }
} map {path => path}

The last map with an identity function is your yield. I can't remember if the spec allows that map to be elided when it's an identity function.

Anyway, I hope this shows more clearly why there's no "reaching back" with that structure.

You can write a lazy, recursive distinctBy function

implicit class DistinctStream[T](s: Stream[T]) {
  def distinctBy[V](f: T => V): Stream[T] = {
    def distinctBy(remainder: Stream[T], seen:Set[V]): Stream[T] =
      remainder match {
        case head #:: tail => 
          val value = f(head)
          if (seen contains value) distinctBy(tail, seen)
          else Stream.cons(head, distinctBy(tail, seen + value))
        case empty => empty
     }

    distinctBy(s, Set())  
  }
}

And use it like so

def solutions(target: Int): Stream[Path] =
(for {
 pathSet <- pathSets
 path <- pathSet
 if path.endState contains target
} yield path) distinctBy (_.endState)

Yeah, now there's recursion. But there already was because Stream's map, flatMap, and filter functions are all lazy recursive functions already.

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