77

I'm fairly new to TypeScript, and right now I have .ts files in several places throughought my project structure:

app/
 |-scripts/
    |-app.ts
    |
    |-classes/
    |  |-classA.ts
    |  |-classB.ts
    |  
    |-controllers/
    |  |-controllerA.ts
    |  |-controllerB.ts
    |  
    |-otherStuff/
       |-otherstuffA.ts

Right now, when my files are compiled, they are compiled to the same directory that the .ts fles are in:

app/
 |-scripts/
    |-app.ts
    |-app.js
    |
    |-classes/
    |  |-classA.ts
    |  |-classB.ts
    |  |-classA.js
    |  |-classB.js
    |  
    |-controllers/
    |  |-controllerA.ts
    |  |-controllerB.ts
    |  |-controllerA.js
    |  |-controllerB.js
    |  
    |-otherStuff/
       |-otherstuffA.ts
       |-otherStuffA.js

While I like the way that the .js files keep the same directory structure as the .ts files, I don't want to track the .js files in my VCS, so I'd like to keep all of my JavaScript files in a separate directory tree (that I can then add to .gitignore), like so:

app/
 |-scripts/
 |  |-app.ts
 |  |
 |  |-classes/
 |  |  |-classA.ts
 |  |  |-classB.ts
 |  |  
 |  |-controllers/
 |  |  |-controllerA.ts
 |  |  |-controllerB.ts
 |  |  
 |  |-otherStuff/
 |     |-otherstuffA.ts
 |
 |-js/
    |-app.js
    |
    |-classes/
    |  |-classA.js
    |  |-classB.js
    |
    |-controllers/
    |  |-controllerA.js
    |  |-controllerB.js
    |
    |-otherStuff/
       |-otherstuffA.js

Is there a setting or option somewhere that will tell the TypeScript compiler to do this? Also, I'm not sure if it's relevant, but I am using WebStorm.

  • I think things get complicated when you have Editor Configuration/tsconfig/webpack config... ( just telling about my feeling...) – Yarco Sep 1 '17 at 4:33
87

Use the option --outDir on tsc (configured within the File Watcher in IntelliJ)

From the command line documentation

--outDir DIRECTORY Redirect output structure to the directory.

Edit

Since Typescript 1.5, this can also be set in the tsconfig.json file:

"compilerOptions": {
    "outDir": "DIRECTORY"
    ...
  • This is exactly what I was looking for! Thanks a lot, I can't believe I didn't see it before... – TheGuyWithTheFace Jun 27 '14 at 16:04
  • 1
    I believe that now you can also use the --rootDir flag to pass a common root folder to the transpiler. This avoid having it find a common root folder. – guzmonne Nov 12 '15 at 2:15
  • why does this option need to be system or amd? I don't want the build to dependent on them. – Nikos Dec 19 '16 at 23:23
  • Except, this seems to break it in 2.0? stackoverflow.com/a/40149682/550975 – Serj Sagan Feb 22 '17 at 3:35
  • 1
    Does this still work? It does not seem to work when building through webpack. – mattnedrich Mar 23 '17 at 22:07
28

Or, add "outDir": "build"to tsconfig.json file

  • 11
    Note: "outDir": "build" goes in the "compilerOptions" object of your tsconfig.json, not as a top-level property. – Jamie Oct 11 '16 at 19:34
3

If you like to map the directory structure of the app/scripts folder in js, I'd suggest using the following settings for your file watcher:

Arguments: --sourcemap --outDir $ProjectFileDir$/js/$FileDirPathFromParent(scripts)$ $FileName$
Working Directory: $FileDir$
Output Paths To Refresh: $ProjectFileDir$/js/$FileDirPathFromParent(scripts)$/$FileNameWithoutExtension$.js:$ProjectFileDir$/js/$FileDirPathFromParent(scripts)$/$FileNameWithoutExtension$.js.map
  • 1
    This indeed solves the problem with a file watcher, but since this feature is deprecated and replaced with the TypeScript Compiler, how is it done with the compiler? – Nitzan Tomer Jul 29 '15 at 20:20
3

I setup package.json like this so that typing npm run start outputs everything to build. The source files are kept in src. The outfile is specified by --outDir build.

{
  "name": "myapp",
  "version": "0.0.1",
  "scripts": {
    "tsc": "tsc",
    "tsc:w": "tsc -w --outDir build",
    "lite": "lite-server",
    "start": "concurrent \"npm run tsc:w\" \"npm run lite\" "
  },
  "license": "private",
  "dependencies": {
    "angular2": "2.0.0-beta.0",
    "systemjs": "0.19.6",
    "es6-promise": "^3.0.2",
    "es6-shim": "^0.33.3",
    "reflect-metadata": "0.1.2",
    "rxjs": "5.0.0-beta.0",
    "zone.js": "0.5.10"
  },
  "devDependencies": {
    "concurrently": "^1.0.0",
    "lite-server": "^1.3.1",
    "typescript": "^1.7.3"
  }
}

You can exclude your build directory in tsconfig.json, though it probably isn't necessary, since there is only JS there:

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    "target": "ES5",
    "module": "system",
    "moduleResolution": "node",
    "sourceMap": true,
    "emitDecoratorMetadata": true,
    "experimentalDecorators": true,
    "removeComments": false,
    "noImplicitAny": false
  },
  "exclude": [
    "node_modules",
    "build"
  ]
}
3

Though these answers are correct you should consider whether you actually just want to hide your .js files from your IDE.

In Visual Studio Code, go to File > Preferences > Settings or your .vscode\settings.json file and enter:

"files.exclude": {
    "**/.git": true,
    "**/.DS_Store": true,
    "**/*.js" : {
        "when": "$(basename).ts"
    },
    "**/*.js.map": {
        "when": "$(basename)"
    }
}

The above hides .js files where a corresponding .ts file exists.

  • 2
    I know this is from a while back, but I was curious, is there an advantage to not using a build folders or were you just offering an alternative? – theaceofthespade Mar 28 '18 at 10:55
  • @theaceofthespade It is useful if you want to include or read files in your source folder relative to __dirname. (For example a .graphql schema file) – janispritzkau Feb 14 at 7:55
2

Intellij Users, compile Typescript to multiple output directories

For Intellij users this may be useful. This was how I got this to work using the built in Typescript Compiler.

Environment Info

Example Directory Structure

BEFORE COMPILE
----------------------------------------
-> JS
   -> app
      -> config.js  //this is not generated
   -> libs
      -> jquery.js  //this is not generated
   -> plugins
-> TS
   -> app
      -> main.ts
   -> libs
      -> jquery.d.ts
   -> plugins
      -> somePlugin.ts

AFTER COMPILE
----------------------------------------
-> JS
   -> app
      -> config.js  //this is not generated
      -> main.js
   -> libs
      -> jquery.js  //this is not generated
   -> plugins
      somePlugin.ts
-> TS
   -> app
      -> main.ts
   -> libs
      -> jquery.d.ts    //this is where I kept my definition files
   -> plugins
      -> somePlugin.ts

Intellij Setup

  • File -> Settings -> Typescript
  • Node Interpreter: Your NodeJS Install Path
  • Compiler Version: typically located at C:\yourUserName\AppData\Roaming\npm\node_modules\typescript\lib
  • Command Line Options: -m amd -t ES6 -outDir E:\myapp\js
  • Check compile main file only and point it to your entry file. E:\myapp\ts\main.ts If this is not checked then all of your files will try to output to your outDir path.

enter image description here

1

Im using Atom with the atom-typescript extension and my tsconfig.json looks like this:

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    "outDir":"js"
  }
}
-1

Regarding Grunt, currently to save your dev folder project structure in production and not get an unexpected result after files have compiled, please refer to the option:

compilerOptions: { 
 rootDir: 'devFolder'
 // ...
}

See the rootDir option in official grunt-ts docs.

I hope it will help someone if they get stuck and get a weird result in production.

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