1

I have list controls with small, static data sources. For example:

<ItemsControl ItemsSource="{Binding Countries}" .../>

and my view model populates the list:

this.Countries.Add(new Country { Code = "BE", Name = "Belgium" });
this.Countries.Add(new Country { Code = "CA", Name = "Canada" });
// etc.

Is there an alternative way to define the list contents in XAML instead? Something like:

<ItemsControl>
    <ItemsControl.ItemsSource>
        <somenamespace:list>
            <mynamespace:Country Code="BE" Name="Belgium" />
            etc.
        </somenamespace:list>
    </ItemsControl.ItemsSource>
</ItemsControl>

I would actually put the lists in separate resource files and would hope to do ItemsSource="{StaticResource myListOfCountries}" after defining them as a resource.

I want to do this to lighten the boilerplate code in my VMs. I wonder if it would negatively affect performance as those objects could be created before the view is rendered, while I could otherwise load these later (on navigated to, on view load, ... vs contructor). Any thoughts welcome!

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  • 1
    This link here might help you out.
    – Rohit Vats
    Jun 27, 2014 at 16:46

2 Answers 2

2

You can do this by creating a new CollectionType, and then populating it in XAML.

Example,

CollectionType that will be used in XAML:

using System.Collections.ObjectModel;

namespace WpfApplication4
{
    public class CountryCollection : ObservableCollection<Country>
    {
    }
}

POCO:

using System;
using System.Collections;

namespace WpfApplication4
{
    public class Country 
    {
        public String Name { get; set; }
        public String Code { get; set; }
    }
}

XAML:

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication4.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:local="clr-namespace:WpfApplication4"
        Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
    <Window.Resources>
        <local:CountryCollection x:Key="CountryList">
            <local:Country Name="Canada" Code="CA"/>
            <local:Country Name="United States" Code="US"/>
            <local:Country Name="Belgium" Code="BE"/>
        </local:CountryCollection>
    </Window.Resources>
    <Grid>
        <ItemsControl ItemsSource="{StaticResource CountryList}">
            <ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
                <DataTemplate>
                    <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal">
                        <Label Content="{Binding Name}"/>
                        <Label Content="{Binding Code}"/>
                    </StackPanel>
                </DataTemplate>
            </ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
        </ItemsControl>
    </Grid>
</Window>

Note, the XAML provided is similar to:

    var CountryList = new ObservableCollection<Country>
    {
        new Country {Name = "Canada", Code = "CA"},
        new Country {Name = "United States", Code = "US"},
        new Country {Name = "Belgium", Code = "BE"}
    };

Edit (Update using an ArrayList)

with the Collections namespace defined in XAML, you can use

   xmlns:collections="clr-namespace:System.Collections;assembly=mscorlib"

<Window.Resources>
    <collections:ArrayList x:Key="CountryList">
        <local:Country Name="Canada" Code="CA"/>
        <local:Country Name="United States" Code="US"/>
        <local:Country Name="Belgium" Code="BE"/>
    </collections:ArrayList>
</Window.Resources>
4
  • You don't need a get set on public class CountryCollection?
    – paparazzo
    Jun 27, 2014 at 16:50
  • @Blam No, CountryCollection is derived from ObservableCollection, so there's not need to create a setter/getter. Through inheritance, it will still simply have all the normal functionality of an ObservableCollection. See my edit
    – d.moncada
    Jun 27, 2014 at 16:55
  • Thanks, I will try this out. Is there a way to not have to create a new collection type? I don't even need an ObservableCollection in this case, List would do (for example). Wonder if I can re-use an existing generic type.
    – siger
    Jun 27, 2014 at 17:39
  • @mleroy Yes, you do not have to create a new type if you do not plan on using an ObservableCollection. You can simply use an ArrayList instead (I added the XAML in my update)
    – d.moncada
    Jun 27, 2014 at 17:45
0

This is how you can do it pure XAML:

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:sys="clr-namespace:System;assembly=mscorlib"
        Title="MainWindow"
        Height="350"
        Width="525">
    <Window.Resources>
        <XmlDataProvider x:Key="MockList"
                         XPath="/MockObjects/*">
            <x:XData>
                <MockObjects xmlns="">
                    <MockObject  Code="BE"
                                 Name="Belgium" />
                    <MockObject  Code="CA"
                                 Name="Canada" />
                    <MockObject  Code="US"
                                 Name="USA! USA!" />
                </MockObjects>
            </x:XData>
        </XmlDataProvider>
    </Window.Resources>
    <Grid DataContext="{Binding Source={StaticResource MockList}}">
        <ItemsControl ItemsSource="{Binding Mode=Default, XPath=/MockObjects/MockObject}">
            <ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
                <DataTemplate>
                    <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal">
                        <TextBlock Text="{Binding XPath=@Code}" FontWeight="Bold" Margin="0 0 5 0"/>
                        <TextBlock Text="{Binding XPath=@Name}" />
                    </StackPanel>
                </DataTemplate>
            </ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
        </ItemsControl>
    </Grid>
</Window>

I used this SO answer as a reference.

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  • Realize though that this method breaks MVVM because your "Model" (Country) is provided only in your view data. Alternatively you could write an XML file and parse it into objects during initialization of your ViewModel.
    – Kcvin
    Jun 27, 2014 at 17:47

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