19

Say I have the following example:

class ClassOne {
    enum Color {
        case Red
        case Blue
    }

    func giveColor() -> Color {
        return .Red
    }
}

class ClassTwo {
    let classOne = ClassOne()
    var color: Color = classOne.giveColor()
}

The compiler complains that it doesn't know what Color is in ClassTwo. How would I best handle this?

0
33

Your Color enumeration is a nested type -- you'll access it as ClassOne.Color. Moreover, you can't assign one property from another in the declaration like that. Leave it unassigned and do it in the init():

class ClassOne {
    enum Color {
        case Red
        case Blue
    }

    func giveColor() -> Color {
        return .Red
    }
}

class ClassTwo {
    let classOne = ClassOne()
    var color: ClassOne.Color

    init() {
        self.color = self.classOne.giveColor()
    }
}
3

You can't use the default value of one property in the default value of another. You can fix this by setting color in the init method:

class ClassTwo {
    let classOne: ClassOne = ClassOne()
    var color: ClassOne.Color
    init(){
        color = classOne.giveColor()
    }
}

Since Color is an enum inside of ClassOne, for its type you should use ClassOne.Color instead of Color.

You could also make color a computed property like this:

class ClassTwo {
    let classOne: ClassOne = ClassOne()
    var color: ClassOne.Color {
    get{
        return classOne.giveColor()
    } }
}

In the first example color is set as classOne.giveColor() only when it is initialized, but in the second example classOne.giveColor() is called everytime you try to access color.

1
  • 1
    You can omit the 'get' block if there is no setter. var color: ClassOne.Color { return classOne.giveColor(); }
    – hnh
    Jun 28 '14 at 21:40

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.