Has anyone using RecyclerView found a way to set an onClickListener to items in the RecyclerView? I thought of setting a listener to each of the layouts for each item but that seems a little too much hassle I'm sure there is a way for the RecyclerView to listen for the onClick event but I can't quite figure it out.

37 Answers 37

up vote 402 down vote accepted

As the API's have radically changed, It wouldn't surprise me if you were to create an OnClickListener for each item. It isn't that much of a hassle though. In your implementation of RecyclerView.Adapter<MyViewHolder>, you should have:

private final OnClickListener mOnClickListener = new MyOnClickListener();

@Override
public MyViewHolder onCreateViewHolder(final ViewGroup parent, final int viewType) {
    View view = LayoutInflater.from(mContext).inflate(R.layout.myview, parent, false);
    view.setOnClickListener(mOnClickListener);
    return new MyViewHolder(view);
}

The onClick method:

@Override
public void onClick(final View view) {
    int itemPosition = mRecyclerView.getChildLayoutPosition(view);
    String item = mList.get(itemPosition);
    Toast.makeText(mContext, item, Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();
}
  • 23
    what if i want to delete a row on its click ? – Piyush Kukadiya Nov 3 '14 at 6:19
  • 16
    I like this answer better than the one you linked. Who wants to write a gesture listener and hit box detection to handle this. Google-- – Lo-Tan Mar 23 '15 at 8:16
  • 15
    getChildPosition(view) is deprecated method – Jigar Apr 15 '15 at 13:48
  • 32
    Do you mind telling which classes are your snippets in? onClick(), belonging to OnClickListener can be attached to ANY View. The whole question here is which! Please make an effort, a method is not only identified by a name, but also at least by a class. If you don't say your code is to be added to the adapter, your answer does not really help. – Vince Jul 20 '15 at 18:58
  • 9
    Should the onClick method be in the fragment that holds the RecyclerView ? Because you reference the mRecyclerView in your MyOnClickListener class. Where did you get the reference to that object ? – Ced Jul 21 '15 at 20:06

Here is a better and less tightly coupled way to implement an OnClickListener for a RecyclerView.

Snippet of usage:

RecyclerView recyclerView = findViewById(R.id.recycler);
recyclerView.addOnItemTouchListener(
    new RecyclerItemClickListener(context, recyclerView ,new RecyclerItemClickListener.OnItemClickListener() {
      @Override public void onItemClick(View view, int position) {
        // do whatever
      }

      @Override public void onLongItemClick(View view, int position) {
        // do whatever
      }
    })
);

RecyclerItemClickListener implementation:

import android.content.Context;
import android.support.v7.widget.RecyclerView;
import android.view.GestureDetector;
import android.view.MotionEvent;
import android.view.View;


public class RecyclerItemClickListener implements RecyclerView.OnItemTouchListener {
  private OnItemClickListener mListener;

  public interface OnItemClickListener {
    public void onItemClick(View view, int position);

    public void onLongItemClick(View view, int position);
  }

  GestureDetector mGestureDetector;

  public RecyclerItemClickListener(Context context, final RecyclerView recyclerView, OnItemClickListener listener) {
    mListener = listener;
    mGestureDetector = new GestureDetector(context, new GestureDetector.SimpleOnGestureListener() {
        @Override
        public boolean onSingleTapUp(MotionEvent e) {
            return true;
        }

        @Override
        public void onLongPress(MotionEvent e) {
            View child = recyclerView.findChildViewUnder(e.getX(), e.getY());
            if (child != null && mListener != null) {
                mListener.onLongItemClick(child, recyclerView.getChildAdapterPosition(child));
            }
        }
    });
}

  @Override public boolean onInterceptTouchEvent(RecyclerView view, MotionEvent e) {
    View childView = view.findChildViewUnder(e.getX(), e.getY());
    if (childView != null && mListener != null && mGestureDetector.onTouchEvent(e)) {
      mListener.onItemClick(childView, view.getChildAdapterPosition(childView));
      return true;
    }
    return false;
  }

  @Override public void onTouchEvent(RecyclerView view, MotionEvent motionEvent) { }

  @Override
  public void onRequestDisallowInterceptTouchEvent (boolean disallowIntercept){}
}
  • 79
    This will not provide any clue about which button or view (within the item) was clicked. But for overall item click, this is fine. – Niranjan Oct 26 '14 at 6:38
  • 27
    ngen's comment is correct - if you want to attach an onClick listener to a specific item within the item view, you should probably do that in your adapter, in onBindViewHolder, or in your viewholder itself. – Jacob Tabak Nov 10 '14 at 16:37
  • 16
    One problem with this method is when you are doing something that takes a few hundred milliseconds like starting an activity. When the item is clicked, and it has a clicked animation there is a noticeable delay between clicking and seeing the animation. – Gak2 Nov 12 '14 at 21:51
  • 19
    This solution feels extremely clunky, there's some delay when processing the 'click' and the feel isn't just ok – wasyl Dec 7 '14 at 23:54
  • 6
    Could anyone explain to me why this solution with the GestureDetector is supposed to be a better solution than just using "setOnClickListener" inside of onBindViewHolder() in the adapter to the according element? This way at least I need less code than with the GestureDetector solution. Thanks for an explanation. – e-nature Jun 1 '15 at 21:30

I do it in this way, without undue classes, detectors etc. Simple code inside our adapter. Especially better solution for longClick than presented before.

public class PasswordAdapter extends RecyclerView.Adapter<PasswordAdapter.ViewHolder> {
    private static ClickListener clickListener;

    public static class ViewHolder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder implements View.OnClickListener, View.OnLongClickListener {
        TextView name;

        public ViewHolder(View itemView) {
            super(itemView);
            itemView.setOnClickListener(this);
            itemView.setOnLongClickListener(this);
            name = (TextView) itemView.findViewById(R.id.card_name);
        }

        @Override
        public void onClick(View v) {
            clickListener.onItemClick(getAdapterPosition(), v);
        }

        @Override
        public boolean onLongClick(View v) {
            clickListener.onItemLongClick(getAdapterPosition(), v);
            return false;
        }
    }

    public void setOnItemClickListener(ClickListener clickListener) {
        PasswordAdapter.clickListener = clickListener;
    }

    public interface ClickListener {
        void onItemClick(int position, View v);
        void onItemLongClick(int position, View v);
    }
}

Then inside fragment or activity, just hit:

PasswordAdapter mAdapter = ...;

mAdapter.setOnItemClickListener(new PasswordAdapter.ClickListener() {
    @Override
    public void onItemClick(int position, View v) {
        Log.d(TAG, "onItemClick position: " + position);
    }

    @Override
    public void onItemLongClick(int position, View v) {
        Log.d(TAG, "onItemLongClick pos = " + position);
    }
});
  • 1
    @nommer Corrected. Thanks :) – Marurban Sep 1 '15 at 11:20
  • 3
    Great. Everything works, even animations. – kroky Oct 16 '15 at 9:08
  • 4
    Best Solution for a simple ClickEvent!!! – maddin Dec 23 '15 at 16:41
  • 8
    ViewHolder must be static for the best performance. this is not a good answer. – Gilberto Ibarra Aug 24 '16 at 8:09
  • 7
    The static clickListener creates a memory leak. Declare the listener as non-static and bind it to the ViewHolder instead. – BladeCoder Dec 20 '16 at 3:43

Based on Jacob Tabak's answer (+1 for him), I was able to add onLongClick listener:

import android.content.Context;
import android.support.v7.widget.RecyclerView;
import android.view.GestureDetector;
import android.view.MotionEvent;
import android.view.View;

public class RecyclerItemClickListener implements RecyclerView.OnItemTouchListener {
    public interface OnItemClickListener {
        void onItemClick(View view, int position);

        void onItemLongClick(View view, int position);
    }

    private OnItemClickListener mListener;

    private GestureDetector mGestureDetector;

    public RecyclerItemClickListener(Context context, final RecyclerView recyclerView, OnItemClickListener listener) {
        mListener = listener;

        mGestureDetector = new GestureDetector(context, new GestureDetector.SimpleOnGestureListener() {
            @Override
            public boolean onSingleTapUp(MotionEvent e) {
                return true;
            }

            @Override
            public void onLongPress(MotionEvent e) {
                View childView = recyclerView.findChildViewUnder(e.getX(), e.getY());

                if (childView != null && mListener != null) {
                    mListener.onItemLongClick(childView, recyclerView.getChildAdapterPosition(childView));
                }
            }
        });
    }

    @Override
    public boolean onInterceptTouchEvent(RecyclerView view, MotionEvent e) {
        View childView = view.findChildViewUnder(e.getX(), e.getY());

        if (childView != null && mListener != null && mGestureDetector.onTouchEvent(e)) {
            mListener.onItemClick(childView, view.getChildAdapterPosition(childView));
        }

        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public void onTouchEvent(RecyclerView view, MotionEvent motionEvent) {
    }

    @Override
    public void onRequestDisallowInterceptTouchEvent(boolean disallowIntercept) {
    }
}

Then you can use it like this:

recyclerView.addOnItemTouchListener(new RecyclerItemClickListener(getActivity(), recyclerView, new RecyclerItemClickListener.OnItemClickListener() {
    @Override
    public void onItemClick(View view, int position) {
        // ...
    }

    @Override
    public void onItemLongClick(View view, int position) {
        // ...
    }
}));
  • 1
    Took me a while to adapt to my app, and align and format code to Java/Android standards, but eventually it worked fine. – milosmns May 14 '15 at 16:59
  • How do you add an animation for the long click? – Jon Jun 17 '15 at 7:11
  • 1
    @Eng.Fouad click effect is not working by using this, although if we set click listener in adapter click effect works any solution to this – ingsaurabh Jul 24 '15 at 7:20
  • 4
    You should also override public void onRequestDisallowInterceptTouchEvent (boolean disallowIntercept){} – Paolo Rotolo Sep 1 '15 at 10:29
  • For some reason it doesn't return a clicked view. In my case I click on a checkbox but given view is something different. The way I check: view.getId() == R.id.selection – dVaffection Nov 24 '15 at 8:02

Check out a similar question @CommonsWare's comment links to this, which implements the OnClickListener interface in the viewHolder.

Here's a simple example of the ViewHolder:

    TextView textView;//declare global with in adapter class

public static class ViewHolder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder implements View.OnClickListener {

      private ViewHolder(View itemView) {
            super(itemView);
            itemView.setOnClickListener(this);
            textView = (TextView)view.findViewById(android.R.id.text1);

      }

      @Override
      public void onClick(View view) {
            Toast.makeText(view.getContext(), "position = " + getLayoutPosition(), Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();

         //go through each item if you have few items within recycler view
        if(getLayoutPosition()==0){
           //Do whatever you want here

        }else if(getLayoutPosition()==1){ 
           //Do whatever you want here         

        }else if(getLayoutPosition()==2){

        }else if(getLayoutPosition()==3){

        }else if(getLayoutPosition()==4){

        }else if(getLayoutPosition()==5){

        }

        //or you can use For loop if you have long list of items. Use its length or size of the list as 
        for(int i = 0; i<exampleList.size(); i++){

        }


      }
  }

The Adapter then looks like this:

    @Override
    public ViewHolder onCreateViewHolder(ViewGroup parent, int viewType) {
        View view =LayoutInflater.from(parent.getContext()).inflate(android.R.layout.simple_list_item_1, parent, false);

        return new ViewHolder(view);
    }
  • 13
    This seems to go the wrong direction though. If you need to re-use a recyclerview in another fragment/activity, the adapter/viewholder are now defining the logic of the clicks instead of whatever is containing them. The clicks should really be handled directly or indirectly by the containing instance. It seems that a touch listener is the only effective way to go about this. – ian.shaun.thomas Oct 13 '14 at 14:49
  • 15
    @tencent I don't see how that is the problem. If the ViewHolder itself contains all information in regards to what data is selected when the element itself is clicked, then the only responsibility of the container is the display of N elements, rather than that of handling the selection of a specific i-th element out of the N elements. The ListView was already problematic if you had to create a list of more complicated objects than just simple rows. What if you need to handle different events depending on where you click the item in the ListView? You're screwed. Here, you have each listeners. – EpicPandaForce Apr 6 '15 at 15:00
  • 2
    I agree with @EpicPandaForce on this one. I also came to upvote this answer after reading the section of Commonsware's book on handling clicks in RecyclerViews It has worked great for me so far. – AdamMc331 Aug 17 '15 at 3:10
  • The whole point of a view holder is for it to hold the references to containing elements. If you use findViewById in onCreateViewHolder you're working around the intentional pattern. – Hubert Grzeskowiak Apr 9 '16 at 23:57
  • 1
    findViewById is only being used on view holder creation here (hence onCreateViewHolder). The view holder is intended to prevent finding the view every time an item is bound to the holder, not on initial creation. – stuckj Jun 15 '16 at 18:49

This is what worked for me. Attach the OnClickListener to the onBindView. I don't really know if this will impact the performance, but it seems to work fine with little code.

public void onBindViewHolder(ViewHolder holder, final int position) {
    holder.view.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
            @Override
            public void onClick(View view) {
                Toast.makeText(context, "Recycle Click" + position, Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
            }
    });
}
  • 3
    in my case holder.itemView.setOnClickListener(..) – D4rWiNS Jul 23 '15 at 7:19
  • 13
    it is named 'itemView' instead of 'view' in my case, just saying for the beginners, some of them dont understand what are they copying, and can't figure out why doesnt work – D4rWiNS Jul 23 '15 at 7:50
  • 3
    Its the layout position – bubunyo Sep 16 '15 at 5:54
  • 1
    for me this seem to only apply for the last visible item not the clicked item – Nasz Njoka Sr. Dec 4 '15 at 12:00
  • 1
    This solution seems the best for me, but how does this differ from @bolot 's answer in therms of performance? He has implemented View.OnClickListener directly on the ViewHolder class, which than spits out the onClick method separately. Which would be the best solution? – Edmond Tamas Apr 24 '16 at 13:18

This was so hard for me to have on item click listener in the activity and also to have click listener for single view of the item that will not trigger on item click listener. After playing around with Jacob Tabak's answer I respect his answer for on item click if no other touch actions inside item are presented.

I have a custom OnClickListener interface that have on item click event which holds the clicked item's view and the item position from the adapter. I present an instance of it in the constructor(or it can be with setter) and attach it to the view holder container click listener.

I also have other click listener in the Adapter(Can be in the view holder) which will handle current View click from the container.

 public class MyRecyclerAdapter extends RecyclerView.Adapter<MyViewHolder> {

private ArrayList<String> mData;
private OnItemClickListener mOnItemClickListener;

public interface OnItemClickListener {
    public void onItemClick(View view, int position);
}

public MyRecyclerAdapter(ArrayList<String> itemsData,
        OnItemClickListener onItemClickListener) {
    mOnItemClickListener = onItemClickListener;
    this.mData = itemsData;
}

@Override
public MyViewHolder onCreateViewHolder(ViewGroup parent,
        int viewType) {

    View layoutView = LayoutInflater.from(mContext).inflate(
            R.layout.list_item, parent, false);

    MyViewHolder viewHolder = new MyViewHolder(layoutView);

    return viewHolder;
}

@Override
public void onBindViewHolder(MyViewHolder viewHolder,
        final int position) {

        viewHolder.container.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {

            @Override
            public void onClick(View v) {
                mOnItemClickListener.onItemClick(v, position);
            }
        });

        viewHilder.button.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {

            @Override
            public void onClick(View v) {
                //do button click work here
            }
        });

}

@Override
public int getItemCount() {
    return mData.size();
}}

In the activity you need to initialize the adapter by passing instance of the OnItemClickListener

public class FeedActivity extends ActionBarActivity {

@Override
protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

    ...

    RecyclerView recyclerView = (RecyclerView) findViewById(R.id.my_recycler_view);

    .....

    MyRecyclerAdapter adapter = new MyRecyclerAdapter(new ArrayList<String>(), new OnItemClickListener() {

        @Override
        public void onItemClick(View view, int position) {

            ///list item was clicked
        }
    });

    recyclerView.setLayoutManager(new LinearLayoutManager(this));
    recyclerView.setAdapter(mFeedsAdapter);
}

And my ViewHolder

public class MyViewHolder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder {

public Button button;
public View container;

public MyViewHolder(View itemLayoutView) {
    super(itemLayoutView);

    container = itemLayoutView;
    button = (Button) itemLayoutView.findViewById(R.id.button);
}}
  • This approach worked well for me - it means you can handle clicks in the activity rather than inside the grid view – leafcutter Apr 19 '15 at 21:11
  • 3
    Where can I give you money. 4 hours of searching and then I read your post. Thanks for the time you took to post this. – Brandon Jul 30 '15 at 20:21
  • 2
    This sounds stupid but, does this have any memory or efficiency like issue? Because we are assigning the click listener every time a view is being drawn right? – rgv Aug 20 '15 at 3:40
  • 1
    @Raghav yes every time view is being bind a new click listener is assigned, but this is the standard flow. But the mOnItemClickListener is created only once for the adapter just the view and its position are different on each item click ;) – Sir NIkolay Cesar The First Sep 24 '15 at 18:53
  • 3
    Great example to kill app performance and create memory overuse! With this example you just need scroll to create hundreds of useless objects, that in a moment will be useless and have to be accessed as garbige. @NoobDogg is right. No ClickListeners haven't to be created at onBindView. A click listener have to be created once in onCreateView (or holder constructor), and exists while we need screen with this adapter. – Mykola Tychyna Sep 11 '17 at 6:57

This is what I ended up needing, in case someone finds it useful:

public static class ViewHolder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder {

    public ViewHolder(View item) {

        super(item);
        item.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {
            @Override
            public void onClick(View v) {
                Log.d("RecyclerView", "onClick:" + getAdapterPosition());
            }
        });

    }
}

Source: http://blog.csdn.net/jwzhangjie/article/details/36868515

  • Of all the versions I tried, this is the one I got working. But is it ok, to do it that way? Or is there a better way, like best practice? – Matthias Loibl Nov 6 '14 at 17:25
  • 1
    As far as I could tell, this was the only way. Check this out for more details! stackoverflow.com/a/24933117/1508887 – Fifer Sheep Nov 6 '14 at 17:30
  • How can i open new fragment from inside onclick method? – sam Jan 5 '15 at 4:58
  • 1
    getPosition() is deprecated now – Anton Malmygin Nov 16 '16 at 18:25
  • 1
    getAdapterPosition() replaces getPosition() – Kennedy Nyaga Jun 5 at 9:27

I have nice solution for RecyclerView's onItemClickListener for the items and subitems

Step 1- Create an interface

public interface OnRecyclerViewItemClickListener
{
    /**
     * Called when any item with in recyclerview or any item with in item
     * clicked
     * 
     * @param position
     *            The position of the item
     * @param id
     *            The id of the view which is clicked with in the item or
     *            -1 if the item itself clicked
     */
    public void onRecyclerViewItemClicked(int position, int id);
}

Step 2- Then use it in adapter's onBindViewHolder method in the following way

/**
     * Custom created method for Setting the item click listener for the items and items with in items
     * @param listener OnRecyclerViewItemClickListener 
     */
    public void setOnItemClickListener(OnRecyclerViewItemClickListener listener)
    {
        this.listener = listener;
    }

    @Override
    public void onBindViewHolder(ViewHolder viewHolder, final int position)
    {

        // viewHolder.albumBg.setBackgroundResource(_itemData[position]
        // .getImageUrl());

        viewHolder.albumName.setText(arrayList.get(position).getName());
        viewHolder.artistName.setText(arrayList.get(position).getArtistName());
        String imgUrl = arrayList.get(position).getThumbImageUrl();

        makeImageRequest(imgUrl, viewHolder);
        viewHolder.parentView.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener()
        {

            @Override
            public void onClick(View v)
            {
                listener.onRecyclerViewItemClicked(position, -1);
            }
        });
        viewHolder.settingButton.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener()
        {

            @Override
            public void onClick(View v)
            {
                listener.onRecyclerViewItemClicked(position, v.getId());
            }
        });

    }

    // class to hold a reference to each item of RecyclerView
    public static class ViewHolder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder
    {

        public TextView albumName, artistName;
        public ImageView albumIcon, settingButton;
        public LinearLayout parentView;

        public ViewHolder(View itemLayoutView)
        {
            super(itemLayoutView);
            // albumBg = (LinearLayout) itemLayoutView
            // .findViewById(R.id.albumDlbg);
            albumName = (TextView) itemLayoutView.findViewById(R.id.albumName);
            artistName = (TextView) itemLayoutView
                    .findViewById(R.id.artistName);
            albumIcon = (ImageView) itemLayoutView.findViewById(R.id.albumIcon);
            parentView = (LinearLayout) itemLayoutView
                    .findViewById(R.id.albumDlbg);
            settingButton = (ImageView) itemLayoutView
                    .findViewById(R.id.settingBtn);
        }

    }

Step 3- find and setup recycler view in activity or fragment where you are using this

recyclerView = (RecyclerView) rootview.findViewById(R.id.vmtopsongs);

        lm = new LinearLayoutManager(mActivity);
        lm.setOrientation(LinearLayoutManager.VERTICAL);
        recyclerView.setLayoutManager(lm);
        recyclerView.addItemDecoration(
                new HorizontalDividerItemDecoration.Builder(getActivity())
                        .paint(Utils.getPaint()).build());
        PopularSongsadapter mAdapter = new PopularSongsadapter(gallery,
                mActivity, true);
        // set adapter
        recyclerView.setAdapter(mAdapter);
        mAdapter.setOnItemClickListener(this);
        // set item animator to DefaultAnimator
        recyclerView.setItemAnimator(new DefaultItemAnimator());

Step 4- Finally implement interface in activity or fragment where you are using the recyclerview

@Override
    public void onRecyclerViewItemClicked(int position, int id)
    {
        if(id==-1){
            Toast.makeText(mActivity, "complete item clicked", Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();
        }else{
            Toast.makeText(mActivity, "setting button clicked", Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();
        }
    }
  • 2
    This is the best solution because we usually need a lot of properties from activity/fragment on our onItemClickListener, and theres no sense to call it direct from the viewholder (i would have to create a custom constructor for each adapter). By the way, your code is a little extense, i suggest you to cut it to the most important part (setOnItemClickListener). – sagits Oct 28 '15 at 16:37
  • This should be accepted and most voted answer. – Vikash Parajuli May 19 '17 at 5:52
  • this is a good simple approach for differentiating the row / item from the sub-items – Nigel Savage May 20 '17 at 23:49

Here is what I did. This solution supports both onClick and onLongClick on both RecyclerView Items and Views insides RecyclerView Items (internal views).

I tag viewHolder on the views of my choice :

public RecyclerViewAdapter.ViewHolder onCreateViewHolder(ViewGroup parent, int viewType) {
    View itemView = LayoutInflater.from(parent.getContext()).inflate(R.layout.layout_item, null);
    ViewHolder viewHolder = new ViewHolder(itemView);

    itemView.setOnClickListener( this);
    itemView.setOnLongClickListener(this);
    viewHolder.imageIV.setOnClickListener(this);
    viewHolder.imageIV.setOnLongClickListener(this);

    viewHolder.imageIV.setTag(viewHolder);
    itemView.setTag(viewHolder);

    return viewHolder;
}

And I use holder.getPosition() to retrieve the position in onClick() method (onLongClick is similar) :

public void onClick(View view) {
    ViewHolder holder = (ViewHolder) view.getTag();
    int position = holder.getPosition();

    if (view.getId() == holder.imageIV.getId()){
        Toast.makeText(context, "imageIV onClick at" + position, Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
    } else {
        Toast.makeText(context, "RecyclerView Item onClick at " + position, Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
    }
}

A variant with getChildPosition also works. Please note that for the internal views, in onClick() use :

int position = recyclerView.getChildPosition((View)view.getParent());

To my mind, the avantage of this solution is that when one clicks on the image, only the onclick() image listener is called whereas when I combined Jacob's solution for a RecyclerView Item view and my solution for internal views the RecyclerView Item view onclick() is also called (when click on image).

There is far easier way to do this. Just apply on click in onBindViewHolder on root view.

Consider this is your view for adapter,

<LinearLayout
    xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    xmlns:card_view="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res-auto"
    android:id="@+id/linearlayout"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:orientation="vertical">

        <TextView
            android:id="@+id/textview"
            android:layout_width="match_parent"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:layout_marginBottom="1dp"
            android:textSize="15sp" />
</LinearLayout>

Then do following in your adapter

//get the layout and make view holder
@Override
public RVAdapter.ViewHolder1 onCreateViewHolder(ViewGroup parent, int viewType) {

    View view = LayoutInflater.from(parent.getContext()).inflate(R.layout.adapter_layout, null);
    ViewHolder1 viewHolder = new ViewHolder1(view);
    return viewHolder;
}

@Override
public void onBindViewHolder(RVAdapter.ViewHolder1 holder, int position) {

    //apply on click on your root view
    holder.linearlayout.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
        @Override
        public void onClick(View v) {
            //Do on click stuff
        }
    });
}

//make references to views in layout including root view
public class ViewHolder1 extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder {

    protected LinearLayout linearlayout = null
    protected TextView textview = null;

    public CareerLinksViewHolder(View itemView) {
        super(itemView);

        this.linearlayout = (LinearLayout) itemView.findViewById(R.id.linearlayout);
        this.tvCompName = (TextView) itemView.findViewById(R.id.textview);
    }
}
  • 1
    I like this solution, simple and did the job. Thanks. – Wessam El Mahdy Sep 21 at 0:12

You can pass a clickListener to Adapter.

In your Activity:

private View.OnClickListener mItemClick = new View.OnClickListener() {

    @Override
    public void onClick(View v) {
        Intent intent = null;
        int position = list.getChildPosition(v);
        switch (position) {
            case 0:
                intent = new Intent(MainActivity.this, LeakCanaryActivity.class);
                break;
            case 1:
                intent = new Intent(MainActivity.this, ButterKnifeFragmentActivity.class);
                break;
        }
        if (intent != null) {
            MainActivity.this.startActivity(intent);
        }
    }
};

then pass it to Adapter:

MainAdapter mainAdapter = new MainAdapter(this, mItemClick);

In Adapter's onCreateViewHolder:

 @Override
public MainAdapter.ViewHolder onCreateViewHolder(ViewGroup viewGroup, int position) {
    View itemView = activity.getLayoutInflater().inflate(R.layout.main_adapter_item, viewGroup, false);
    ViewHolder holder = new ViewHolder(itemView);
    itemView.setOnClickListener(mItemClick);
    return holder;
}
  • How do you pass the holder values through intent? – RoCk May 23 at 11:42

I have developed a light weighted library for android, you can visit https://github.com/ChathuraHettiarachchi/RecycleClick

and follow for following sample

RecycleClick.addTo(YOUR_RECYCLEVIEW).setOnItemClickListener(new RecycleClick.OnItemClickListener() {
            @Override
            public void onItemClicked(RecyclerView recyclerView, int position, View v) {
                // YOUR CODE
            }
        });
  • Can confirm, this library is great! Very easy to use, good job! – peterkodermac Jul 16 '17 at 14:15

You can implement OnClickListener to your ViewHolder class

public static class ViewHolder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder implements View.OnClickListener {
        public Item item
        @InjectView(R.id.tv_title)
        public TextView tvTitle;
        @InjectView(R.id.rl_row)
        public RelativeLayout rlRow;

        public ViewHolder(View v) {
            super(v);
            ButterKnife.inject(this, v);
            v.setOnClickListener(this);
        }

        @Override
        public void onClick(View view) {
            Log.e("item title",item.getTitle());
        }
    }

And onBindViewHolder set your view holder's item

public void onBindViewHolder(ViewHolder holder, int position) {
        holder.tvTitle.setText(objects.get(position).getTitle());
        holder.item = objects.get(position);
        }

Way too simple and effective.

Instead of implementing interface View.OnClickListener inside view holder or creating and interface and implementing interface in your activity - I used this code for simple on OnClickListener implementation.

public static class SimpleStringRecyclerViewAdapter
            extends RecyclerView.Adapter<SimpleStringRecyclerViewAdapter.ViewHolder> {

        // Your initializations goes here...
        private List<String> mValues;

        public static class ViewHolder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder {

            //create a variable mView
            public final View mView;

            /*All your row widgets goes here
            public final ImageView mImageView;
            public final TextView mTextView;*/

            public ViewHolder(View view) {
                super(view);
                //Initialize it here
                mView = view;

                /* your row widgets initializations goes here
                mImageView = (ImageView) view.findViewById(R.id.avatar);
                mTextView = (TextView) view.findViewById(android.R.id.text1);*/
            }
        }

        public String getValueAt(int position) {
            return mValues.get(position);
        }

        public SimpleStringRecyclerViewAdapter(Context context, List<String> items) {

            mBackground = mTypedValue.resourceId;
            mValues = items;
        }

        @Override
        public ViewHolder onCreateViewHolder(ViewGroup parent, int viewType) {
            View view = LayoutInflater.from(parent.getContext())
                    .inflate(R.layout.list_item, parent, false);
            view.setBackgroundResource(mBackground);
            return new ViewHolder(view);
        }

        @Override
        public void onBindViewHolder(final ViewHolder holder, int position) {
            holder.mBoundString = mValues.get(position);
            holder.mTextView.setText(mValues.get(position));

            //Here it is simply write onItemClick listener here
            holder.mView.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
                @Override
                public void onClick(View v) {
                    Context context = v.getContext();
                    Intent intent = new Intent(context, ExampleActivity.class);

                    context.startActivity(intent);
                }
            });
        }

        @Override
        public int getItemCount() {
            return mValues.size();
        }
    }
  • 3
    This is a common bad practice because it looks way too easy. You are creating a new inner listener each time an object is binded (and each item in a recycler can be bound lots of times) which is bad for a)performance b)garbage collection. Instead you should create ONE listener somewhere (in the viewholder, in the adapter, in the upper fragment or activity) and just add it to the items in the viewholder constructor on in onCreateViewHolder. This has the added complexity of having to figure out which item was clicker, but can be solved easily via tags or adding more info to the holder. – GuillermoMP Feb 20 '16 at 22:16

All the answers posted so far are great solutions, however if you do not want to deal with too many implementation details, and just want it to work similarly to how ListView does, I would recommend using TwoWay-View, as seen here:

https://github.com/lucasr/twoway-view

Note that this implementation also supports long press on items, as well as support for pressed states (which is something important that other solutions to this question lack).

If you don't want to use the entire library, take a look at the ClickItemTouchListener class, which can be used as a standalone if needed. The only issue I found with it at the moment is with long press + scrolling, it seems to have incorrect behaviour.

If you want to catch click event On Individual items then just implement OnClickListener in ViewHolder class and then set click listeners on individual views or whole itemView.

Following example shows the same

public  class ContactViewHolder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder implements OnClickListener
    {
        TextView txt_title,txt_name,txt_email;

        public ContactViewHolder(View itemView) 
        {
            super(itemView);
            txt_title = (TextView)itemView.findViewById(R.id.txt_title);
            txt_name  = (TextView)itemView.findViewById(R.id.txt_name);
            txt_email = (TextView)itemView.findViewById(R.id.txt_email);

            txt_name.setOnClickListener(this);
            txt_email.setOnClickListener(this);
            itemView.setOnClickListener(this);
        }

        @Override
        public void onClick(View v) {
            // TODO Auto-generated method stub

            if(v == itemView)
            {
                Toast.makeText(RecyclerDemoActivity.this, "Visiting Card Clicked is ==>"+txt_name.getText(), Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
            }

            if(v == txt_name)
            {
                Toast.makeText(RecyclerDemoActivity.this, "Name ==>"+txt_name.getText(), Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
            }

            if(v == txt_email)
            {
                Toast.makeText(RecyclerDemoActivity.this, "Email ==>"+txt_email.getText(), Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
            }
        }

    }
} 

For me, this is the best way:

class YourRecyclerAdapter extends RecyclerView.Adapter<ContactViewHolder> implements View.OnClickListener { 
  ...
  @Override
  public void onClick(View view) {
        int itemPosition = vRecycle.getChildPosition(view);
        //And use itemPosition to get the item from your collection. This way you dont restrain the ViewHolder with a OnClick callback
    }
  ...
}
  • 1
    getChildPosition() is decapitated – Nasz Njoka Sr. Dec 4 '15 at 12:08

Here is what I did Read more & download the gist here

Adding the same here

CustomItemClickListener.java

public interface CustomItemClickListener {
 public void onItemClick(View v, int position);
}

ItemsListAdapter.java

public class ItemsListAdapter extends RecyclerView.Adapter<ItemsListAdapter.ViewHolder> {
ArrayList<ItemListSingleItem> data;

Context mContext;
CustomItemClickListener listener;

@Override
public ViewHolder onCreateViewHolder(ViewGroup parent, int viewType) {
    View mView = LayoutInflater.from(parent.getContext()).inflate(R.layout.items_list_single_item, parent, false);
    final ViewHolder mViewHolder = new ViewHolder(mView);
    mView.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
        @Override
        public void onClick(View v) {
            listener.onItemClick(v, mViewHolder.getPosition());
        }
    });
    return mViewHolder;
}

@Override
public void onBindViewHolder(ViewHolder holder, int position) {
    holder.itemTitle.setText(Html.fromHtml(data.get(position).getTitle()));
    if (!TextUtils.isEmpty(data.get(position).getThumbnailURL())) {
      // I Love picasso library :) http://square.github.io/picasso/
        Picasso.with(mContext).load(data.get(position).getThumbnailURL()).error(R.drawable.ic_no_image).
                placeholder(R.drawable.ic_no_image).
                transform(new RoundedCornersTransformation(5, 0)).
                into(holder.thumbnailImage);
    } else {
        holder.thumbnailImage.setImageResource(R.drawable.ic_no_image);
    }
}


@Override
public int getItemCount() {
    return data.size();
}

public ItemsListAdapter(Context mContext, ArrayList<ItemsListSingleItem> data, CustomItemClickListener listener) {
    this.data = data;
    this.mContext = mContext;
    this.listener = listener;
}

public static class ViewHolder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder {
    public TextView itemTitle;
    public ImageView thumbnailImage;

    ViewHolder(View v) {
        super(v);
        itemTitle = (TextView) v
                .findViewById(R.id.post_title);
        thumbnailImage = (ImageView) v.findViewById(R.id.post_thumb_image);
    }
 }
}

The RecyclerView does not have a OnClickListener and will have to implement it ourselves.

I like to add a OnItemClickListener interface in Adapter with an onClick method invoked when you click on the item view from the ViewHolder. Thus the responsibility of managing the click on an item is outside the ViewHolder and Adapter. Will the activity or fragment which will decide what to do

Add an interface to the listener and the listener object.

public class ItemsAdapter extends RecyclerView.Adapter<ItemsAdapter.ViewHolder> {

  ...

  private static OnItemClickListener onItemClickListener;

  ...

  public static interface OnItemClickListener {
      public void onItemClick(View view, int position);
  }

  ...
}

We capture the click of the root view of the item and when the callback is triggered onClick listener call on the adapter .

public class ItemsAdapter extends RecyclerView.Adapter<ItemsAdapter.ViewHolder> {

  ...

  private static OnItemClickListener onItemClickListener;

  ...

  public static interface OnItemClickListener {
      public void onItemClick(View view, int position);
  }

  ...

  public static class ViewHolder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder {
      public ImageView imageView;

      public ViewHolder(View itemRootView) {
          super(itemRootView);
          imageView = (ImageView) itemRootView.findViewById(R.id.itemImage);

          itemRootView.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
              @Override
              public void onClick(View view) {
                  int position  = ViewHolder.super.getAdapterPosition();
                  onItemClickListener.onItemClick(view,position);
              }
          });
      }
  }
}

Since the activity or fragment , fragment in our case , we assign a listener to the adapter and the onClick callback we will get the selected item by position and opened a detailed activity of item.

public class ItemsFragment extends Fragment {
    ...
    @Override
    public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup container,
                             Bundle savedInstanceState) {
       ...    
        ((ItemsAdapter) adapter).setOnItemClickListener(new ItemsAdapter.OnItemClickListener() {
            @Override
            public void onItemClick(View view, int position) {
                //Do something when an item has been clicked
            }
        });
        ...
    }
...
}

Unfortunately RecyclerView is missing a couple of features that ListView had built-in. For example the ability to add an OnItemClickListener that triggers when an item is clicked. RecyclerView allows you to set an OnClickListener in your adapter, but passing on that click listener from your calling code, to the adapter and to the ViewHolder, is complicated for catching a simple item click.

public class ItemClickSupport {
private final RecyclerView mRecyclerView;
private OnItemClickListener mOnItemClickListener;
private OnItemLongClickListener mOnItemLongClickListener;
private View.OnClickListener mOnClickListener = new View.OnClickListener() {
    @Override
    public void onClick(View v) {
        if (mOnItemClickListener != null) {
            RecyclerView.ViewHolder holder = mRecyclerView.getChildViewHolder(v);
            mOnItemClickListener.onItemClicked(mRecyclerView, holder.getAdapterPosition(), v);
        }
    }
};
private View.OnLongClickListener mOnLongClickListener = new View.OnLongClickListener() {
    @Override
    public boolean onLongClick(View v) {
        if (mOnItemLongClickListener != null) {
            RecyclerView.ViewHolder holder = mRecyclerView.getChildViewHolder(v);
            return mOnItemLongClickListener.onItemLongClicked(mRecyclerView, holder.getAdapterPosition(), v);
        }
        return false;
    }
};
private RecyclerView.OnChildAttachStateChangeListener mAttachListener
        = new RecyclerView.OnChildAttachStateChangeListener() {
    @Override
    public void onChildViewAttachedToWindow(View view) {
        if (mOnItemClickListener != null) {
            view.setOnClickListener(mOnClickListener);
        }
        if (mOnItemLongClickListener != null) {
            view.setOnLongClickListener(mOnLongClickListener);
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void onChildViewDetachedFromWindow(View view) {

    }
};

private ItemClickSupport(RecyclerView recyclerView) {
    mRecyclerView = recyclerView;
    mRecyclerView.setTag(R.id.item_click_support, this);
    mRecyclerView.addOnChildAttachStateChangeListener(mAttachListener);
}

public static ItemClickSupport addTo(RecyclerView view) {
    ItemClickSupport support = (ItemClickSupport) view.getTag(R.id.item_click_support);
    if (support == null) {
        support = new ItemClickSupport(view);
    }
    return support;
}

public static ItemClickSupport removeFrom(RecyclerView view) {
    ItemClickSupport support = (ItemClickSupport) view.getTag(R.id.item_click_support);
    if (support != null) {
        support.detach(view);
    }
    return support;
}

public ItemClickSupport setOnItemClickListener(OnItemClickListener listener) {
    mOnItemClickListener = listener;
    return this;
}

public ItemClickSupport setOnItemLongClickListener(OnItemLongClickListener listener) {
    mOnItemLongClickListener = listener;
    return this;
}

private void detach(RecyclerView view) {
    view.removeOnChildAttachStateChangeListener(mAttachListener);
    view.setTag(R.id.item_click_support, null);
}

public interface OnItemClickListener {

    void onItemClicked(RecyclerView recyclerView, int position, View v);
}

public interface OnItemLongClickListener {

    boolean onItemLongClicked(RecyclerView recyclerView, int position, View v);
}
}

You also need to define R.id.item_click_support using ids.xml:

 <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
 <resources>
  <item name="item_click_support" type="id" />
 </resources>

The resulting code click listener now looks like this:

ItemClickSupport.addTo(mRecyclerView).setOnItemClickListener(new ItemClickSupport.OnItemClickListener() {
@Override
public void onItemClicked(RecyclerView recyclerView, int position, View v) {
    // do it
}
});

For Brief Explanation about recyclerview clicks please have a look at this littlerobots_blog

From most of the answers above, they seem to be setting their onclicklisteners to individual items. However, the solution am about to offer is very simple but yet not intuitive to many. Many are forgetting that the other components are always in a parent component which is used to display items in the List or Recycler views. This solution is just about setting a single onclick listener to this parent view and the turn is played. The solution also includes a way to pass the position of the item being clicked on from the list or recycler view. Here, our main rootview is a CardView from the android support library. Here is sample code

public class ListAdapter extends RecyclerView.Adapter<ListAdapter.ViewHolder> {

public static final String LOG_TAG = ListAdapter.class.getSimpleName();
private Cursor mDataset;
private Context mContext;
private ViewHolder mViewHolder;

// Provide a suitable constructor (depends on the kind of dataset)
public ListAdapter(Context context, Cursor Dataset) {
    mDataset = Dataset;
    mContext = context;
}

// Create new views (invoked by the layout manager)
@Override
public ViewHolder onCreateViewHolder(ViewGroup parent, int viewType) {

    // create a new view
    View v = LayoutInflater.from(parent.getContext())
            .inflate(R.layout.list_business_view, parent, false);

    mViewHolder = new ViewHolder(v);
    return mViewHolder;
}

public void setData(Cursor newdata) {
    this.mDataset = newdata;
}

// Replace the contents of a view (invoked by the layout manager)
@Override
public void onBindViewHolder(ViewHolder holder, int position) {
//Bind data to other items here. To save time, i have ommited that.
           //here is where we attach a click listerner for an item in the recycler list rather than for each element of a given item.
            holder.card.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
                @Override
                public void onClick(View v) {
                    Toast.makeText(mContext, " Just cliked item at position " + itemPosition, Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();

            }
        });

    }
}

// Return the size of your dataset (invoked by the layout manager)
@Override
public int getItemCount() {
    if (null != mDataset) {
        return mDataset.getCount();
    }
    return 0;

}


// Provide a reference to the views for each data item
// Complex data items may need more than one view per item, and
// you provide access to all the views for a data item in a view holder
public static class ViewHolder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder{
    // each data item is just a string in this case
    public final TextView mBusinesssName; // View for the business name
    public final TextView mBusinessCategory; //View for the category name
    public final ImageView businessImage; // View for the business category image Image
    public final TextView mBusinessDistance; // View for the distance
    public final CardView card;

    public ViewHolder(View view) {
        super(view);
        mBusinesssName = (TextView) view.findViewById(R.id.list_item_name_textview);
        mBusinessCategory = (TextView) view.findViewById(R.id.list_item_category_textview);
        mBusinessDistance = (TextView) view.findViewById(R.id.list_item_dist_textview);
        businessImage = (ImageView) view.findViewById(R.id.list_item_icon);
        card = (CardView) view.findViewById(R.id.card_view);

    }
}
}

you can easily define setOnClickListener in your ViewHolder class as follow :

public class ViewHolder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder {
    TextView product_name;

    ViewHolder(View itemView) {
        super(itemView);
        product_name = (TextView) itemView.findViewById(R.id.product_name);
        itemView.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
            @Override
            public void onClick(View view) {
                int itemPosition = getLayoutPosition();
                Toast.makeText(getApplicationContext(), itemPosition + ":" + String.valueOf(product_name.getText()), Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
            }
        });
    }
}

Kotlin implementation of nhaarman's answer :

mRecyclerView.addOnItemTouchListener(object  : RecyclerItemClickListener(this, mRecyclerView,object :RecyclerItemClickListener.OnItemClickListener{
            override fun onItemClick(view: View, position: Int) {

            }

            override fun onLongItemClick(view: View?, position: Int) {

            }
}){})

RecyclerItemClickListener.java :

import android.content.Context
import android.support.v7.widget.RecyclerView
import android.view.GestureDetector
import android.view.MotionEvent
import android.view.View


open class RecyclerItemClickListener(context: Context, recyclerView: RecyclerView, private val mListener: OnItemClickListener?) : RecyclerView.OnItemTouchListener {

    private var mGestureDetector: GestureDetector

    interface OnItemClickListener {
        fun onItemClick(view: View, position: Int)

        fun onLongItemClick(view: View?, position: Int)
    }

    init {
        mGestureDetector = GestureDetector(context, object : GestureDetector.SimpleOnGestureListener() {
            override fun onSingleTapUp(e: MotionEvent): Boolean {
                return true
            }

            override fun onLongPress(e: MotionEvent) {
                val child = recyclerView.findChildViewUnder(e.x, e.y)
                if (child != null && mListener != null) {
                    mListener.onLongItemClick(child, recyclerView.getChildAdapterPosition(child))
                }
            }
        })
    }

    override fun onInterceptTouchEvent(view: RecyclerView, e: MotionEvent): Boolean {
        val childView = view.findChildViewUnder(e.x, e.y)
        if (childView != null && mListener != null && mGestureDetector.onTouchEvent(e)) {
            mListener.onItemClick(childView, view.getChildAdapterPosition(childView))
            return true
        }
        return false
    }

    override fun onTouchEvent(view: RecyclerView, motionEvent: MotionEvent) {}

    override fun onRequestDisallowInterceptTouchEvent(disallowIntercept: Boolean) {}
}

here is complete code for my custom adapter this code will inflate the rows with list items defined in the xml file named "list_item" it will also perform click event on all list items rows with respective positions.

public class MyCustomAdapter extends RecyclerView.Adapter<AdapterMyCustomAdapter.ViewHolder> {

public static class ViewHolder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder implements OnClickListener{

    public onItemClickListener mListener;

    public ViewHolder(View v, onItemClickListener listener) {
        super(v);
        mListener =listener;
        v.setOnClickListener(this);
    }

    @Override
    public void onClick(View v) {
        mListener.onRecyclerItemClick(v, getPosition());
    }

    public static interface onItemClickListener {
        public void onRecyclerItemClick(View view , int position);

    }

}

@Override
public int getItemCount() {

    return 5;
}

@Override
public void onBindViewHolder(ViewHolder holder, int pos) {      

}

@Override
public ViewHolder onCreateViewHolder(ViewGroup parent, int position) {
    View v = LayoutInflater.from(parent.getContext())
            .inflate(R.layout.list_item, parent, false);

/* here list_item is an xml file we want to inflate ...it is same as we do in case of listview for customization.*/

    MyCustomAdapter.ViewHolder vh = new ViewHolder(v, new MyCustomAdapter.ViewHolder.onItemClickListener() {

        @Override
        public void onRecyclerItemClick(View view, int position) {


            System.out.println("clicked on list item at position " +position);

        } 

    });
    return vh;
}

}

For me the clean way to do that is this one.

  • Adapter constructor

    `private class EnvironmentTypeRecyclerViewAdapter extends RecyclerView.Adapter {

    private final EnvironmentTypeRecyclerViewAdapterListener mEnvironmentTypeRecyclerViewAdapterListener;
    private List<Environment> mEnvironmentsData;
    
    
    public class ViewHolder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder implements View.OnClickListener
    {
    
        public ViewHolder(View v)
        {
            super(v);
            v.setOnClickListener(this);
    
        }
    
        @Override
        public void onClick(View v)
        {
    
            Environment environment = mEnvironmentsData.get(getAdapterPosition());
            if (mEnvironmentTypeRecyclerViewAdapterListener != null && environment != null)
            {
                mEnvironmentTypeRecyclerViewAdapterListener.onListItemSelected(environment);
            }
        }
    }
    
    public EnvironmentTypeRecyclerViewAdapter(List<SmallCellEnvironment> environments, EnvironmentTypeRecyclerViewAdapterListener environmentTypeRecyclerViewAdapterListener)
    {
        mEnvironmentTypeRecyclerViewAdapterListener = environmentTypeRecyclerViewAdapterListener;
        mEnvironmentsData = environments;
    }`
    

The Linked Interface

private interface EnvironmentTypeRecyclerViewAdapterListener
{
    void onListItemSelected(Environment environment);
}

I'm aware there are a lot of answers, but I thought I might just provide my implementation of it as well. (Full details can be found on another question I answered).

So, to add a click listener, your inner ViewHolder class needs to implement View.OnClickListener. This is because you will set an OnClickListener to the itemView parameter of the ViewHolder's constructor. Let me show you what I mean:

public class ExampleClickViewHolder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder implements View.OnClickListener {

    TextView text1, text2;

    ExampleClickViewHolder(View itemView) {
        super(itemView);

        // we do this because we want to check when an item has been clicked:
        itemView.setOnClickListener(this);

        // now, like before, we assign our View variables
        title = (TextView) itemView.findViewById(R.id.text1);
        subtitle = (TextView) itemView.findViewById(R.id.text2);
    }

    @Override
    public void onClick(View v) {
        // The user may not set a click listener for list items, in which case our listener
        // will be null, so we need to check for this
        if (mOnEntryClickListener != null) {
            mOnEntryClickListener.onEntryClick(v, getLayoutPosition());
        }
    }
}

The only other things you need to add are a custom interface for your Adapter and a setter method:

private OnEntryClickListener mOnEntryClickListener;

public interface OnEntryClickListener {
    void onEntryClick(View view, int position);
}

public void setOnEntryClickListener(OnEntryClickListener onEntryClickListener) {
    mOnEntryClickListener = onEntryClickListener;
}

So your new, click-supporting Adapter is complete.

Now, let's use it...

    ExampleClickAdapter clickAdapter = new ExampleClickAdapter(yourObjects);
    clickAdapter.setOnEntryClickListener(new ExampleClickAdapter.OnEntryClickListener() {
        @Override
        public void onEntryClick(View view, int position) {
            // stuff that will happen when a list item is clicked
        }
    });

It's basically how you would set up a normal Adapter, except that you use your setter method that you created to control what you will do when your user clicks a particular list item.

You can also look through a set of examples I made on this Gist on GitHub:

https://gist.github.com/FarbodSalamat-Zadeh/7646564f48ee708c1582c013e1de4f07

  • You should use getAdapterPosition() instead of getLayoutPosition() – BladeCoder Dec 20 '16 at 3:47

This is what I do to reuse OnClickListener

  public class TestAdapter extends RecyclerView.Adapter<TestAdapter.MyviewHolder>
                                         implements View.OnClickListener

in ViewHoder Take itemlayout's parent

  public class MyviewHolder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder {

       LinearLayout linearLayout_item;

        public MyviewHolder(View itemView) {
            super(itemView);
            linearLayout_item=itemView.findViewById(R.id.linearLayout_item);
        }
    }

in onBindViewHolder set tag as position

   @Override
    public void onBindViewHolder(MyviewHolder holder, int position) {

       holder.linearLayout_item.setTag(position);
       holder.linearLayout_item.setOnClickListener(this);
    }

and in Onclick

 @Override
public void onClick(View v) {

    int position = (int) v.getTag();
    switch (v.getId()) {
        case R.id.linearLayout_item:

            // do some thing with position 

            break;
    }
}

Mark the class as abstract and implement an OnClick method

public abstract class MainGridAdapter extends
    RecyclerView.Adapter<MainGridAdapter.ViewHolder> {
private List<MainListItem> mDataset;

// Provide a reference to the views for each data item
// Complex data items may need more than one view per item, and
// you provide access to all the views for a data item in a view holder
public class ViewHolder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder {
    // each data item is just a string in this case
    public TextView txtHeader;
    public TextView txtFooter;

    public ViewHolder(View v) {
        super(v);
        txtHeader = (TextView) v.findViewById(R.id.firstLine);
        txtFooter = (TextView) v.findViewById(R.id.secondLine);
    }
}

public void add(int position, MainListItem item) {
    mDataset.add(position, item);
    notifyItemInserted(position);
}

public void remove(MainListItem item) {
    int position = mDataset.indexOf(item);
    mDataset.remove(position);
    notifyItemRemoved(position);
}

// Provide a suitable constructor (depends on the kind of dataset)
public MainGridAdapter(List<MainListItem> myDataset) {
    mDataset = myDataset;
}

// Create new views (invoked by the layout manager)
@Override
public MainGridAdapter.ViewHolder onCreateViewHolder(ViewGroup parent,
        int viewType) {
    // create a new view
    View v = LayoutInflater.from(parent.getContext()).inflate(
            R.layout.list_item_grid_line, parent, false);
    // set the view's size, margins, paddings and layout parameters
    ViewHolder vh = new ViewHolder(v);
    return vh;
}

// Replace the contents of a view (invoked by the layout manager)
@Override
public void onBindViewHolder(final ViewHolder holder, final int position) {
    // - get element from your dataset at this position
    // - replace the contents of the view with that element     
    OnClickListener clickListener = new OnClickListener() {
        @Override
        public void onClick(View v) {
            onItemClicked(position);
        }
    };
    holder.itemView.setOnClickListener(clickListener);
    holder.txtHeader.setOnClickListener(clickListener);
    holder.txtFooter.setOnClickListener(clickListener);
    final MainListItem item = mDataset.get(position);
    holder.txtHeader.setText(item.getTitle());
    if (TextUtils.isEmpty(item.getDescription())) {
        holder.txtFooter.setVisibility(View.GONE);
    } else {
        holder.txtFooter.setVisibility(View.VISIBLE);
        holder.txtFooter.setText(item.getDescription());
    }
}

// Return the size of your dataset (invoked by the layout manager)
@Override
public int getItemCount() {
    return mDataset.size();
}

public abstract void onItemClicked(int position);

}

Implement click handler in binding event to only have one event implementation

Implementation of this:

mAdapter = new MainGridAdapter(listItems) {         
    @Override
    public void onItemClicked(int position) {
        showToast("Item Clicked: " + position, ToastPlus.STYLE_INFO);
    }
};

Same can be done for long click

Here is my Code Snippet

v.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {
        @Override
        public void onClick(View v) 
        {
            int newposition = MainActivity.mRecyclerView.getChildAdapterPosition(v);
            Intent cardViewIntent = new Intent(c, in.itechvalley.cardviewexample.MainActivityCards.class);
            cardViewIntent.putExtra("Position", newposition);
            c.startActivity(cardViewIntent);
        }
    });

v is View from onCreateViewHolder

c is Context

protected by Community Dec 12 '15 at 21:33

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