-5

Consider the two scenarios-

scenario 1:

class S{
   String s="hello";
   s="world";
   System.out.println(s);
}
public class StringImmutable{
    public static void main(String args[]){

    }

Result- it throws uncompiled code error at pkg.StringImmutable.main(StringImmutable.java:12)

but when i do this-

class S{
    String s="hello";

    void change(){
        s="world";
        System.out.println(s);
    }
}
public class StringImmutable{
     public static void main(String args[]){
         S s=new S();
         s.change();
     }
}

Result- world..it works just fine.

how is String immutable?enter code here

  • You need to differentiate variable from object. – Bhesh Gurung Jun 29 '14 at 8:55
  • 1
    If a string was immutable then s1="hello"; s2=s1; s2.change(); would also change s1. What you're doing is changing s to point to a different string – Richard Tingle Jun 29 '14 at 8:55
  • When you do s="world", s starts pointing to a new String object ("world"). "hello" remains as is in memory to be GCed later on. – Islay Jun 29 '14 at 8:55
  • @HussainAkhtarWahid'Ghouri':- i agree – rock321987 Jun 29 '14 at 8:56
  • New users can google like anyone else. "what does string is immutable mean" yields more than enough results. – Jeroen Vannevel Jun 29 '14 at 8:57
4

You are creating new Strings - no mutation involved. Every time you think you edit a String (i.e. s1 = s1 + s2, s1 += s2, s1 = s1.substring( ...) its the creation of a new String, not a mutation.

Strings are not mutable by design.

  • (Not always. The assignment ('=') does not create a new string. It is the stuff on the RHS that may create the new string.) – Stephen C Jun 29 '14 at 9:14
  • Chapeau ... edited my answer. – Florian Salihovic Jun 29 '14 at 9:35

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