9538

Can I use comments inside a JSON file? If so, how?

22
  • 218
    @StingyJack: To explain things that may not be obvious, or whatever else one might do with comments. I for one often have comments in data files. XML, ini files, and many other formats include provisions for comments. Oct 28, 2008 at 20:51
  • 42
    If you, like me, were wondering whether //comments are OK for the specific use-case of a Sublime Text configuration file, the answer is yes (as of version 2). Sublime Text will not complain about it, at least, whereas it will complain about {"__comment": ...} in the console, because it is an unexpected field.
    – floer32
    Feb 1, 2013 at 15:12
  • 38
    JSON5 supports comments: stackoverflow.com/a/7901053/108238
    – schoetbi
    Feb 2, 2015 at 11:13
  • 26
    "I removed comments from JSON because I saw people were using them to hold parsing directives, a practice which would have destroyed interoperability. I know that the lack of comments makes some people sad, but it shouldn't." - Douglas Crockford (Author of JSON), 2012 Nov 20, 2019 at 15:45
  • 17
    Image the inventor of the hammer. He probably wanted to bust up rocks into flecks that could be used to make knives and axes. We'd still be in the stone age if he insisted that his tool could not be used for anything else, like hitting people attacking you, or turning wheat into flour, or driving nails. It's the height of hubris to assume that it's MY way or nothing. Neglecting comments is a great example of assuming this tool will never have another use than data communication between machines/programs. Such lack of foresight is shameful.
    – SMBiggs
    Nov 20, 2020 at 20:44

62 Answers 62

14

To cut a JSON item into parts I add "dummy comment" lines:

{

"#############################" : "Part1",

"data1"             : "value1",
"data2"             : "value2",

"#############################" : "Part2",

"data4"             : "value3",
"data3"             : "value4"

}
4
  • 16
    You've emulated an INI file structure in JSON. Please, put down your Golden Hammer. Nov 18, 2013 at 16:53
  • 4
    RFC says "The names within an object SHOULD be unique". Also see this person that is having an error parsing JSON like the above: stackoverflow.com/questions/4912386/… Jun 10, 2014 at 15:58
  • If you're using a schema to validate the JSON, it may fail due to the extra fields. Jun 26, 2015 at 0:32
  • 1
    If you're really determined to add comments to your JSON, it would make much more sense to do something like this: { "comment-001":"This is where you do abc...", "comment-002":"This is where you do xyz..." } This keeps the name unique and lets you add whatever string value you like. It's still a kludge, because comments should not be part of your JSON. As another alternative, why not add comments before or after your JSON, but not within it?
    – Jazimov
    Sep 4, 2015 at 22:51
12

The author of JSON wants us to include comments in the JSON, but strip them out before parsing them (see link provided by Michael Burr). If JSON should have comments, why not standardize them, and let the JSON parser do the job? I don't agree with the logic there, but, alas, that's the standard. Using a YAML solution as suggested by others is good, but it requires a library dependency.

If you want to strip out comments, but don't want to have a library dependency, here is a two-line solution, which works for C++-style comments, but can be adapted to others:

var comments = new RegExp("//.*", 'mg');
data = JSON.parse(fs.readFileSync(sample_file, 'utf8').replace(comments, ''));

Note that this solution can only be used in cases where you can be sure that the JSON data does not contain the comment initiator, e.g. ('//').

Another way to achieve JSON parsing, stripping of comments, and no extra library, is to evaluate the JSON in a JavaScript interpreter. The caveat with that approach, of course, is that you would only want to evaluate untainted data (no untrusted user-input). Here is an example of this approach in Node.js -- another caveat, the following example will only read the data once and then it will be cached:

data = require(fs.realpathSync(doctree_fp));
16
  • 11
    This does not work, because it doesn't take into account if /* could be escaped, or could be inside a string literal. JSON is not a regular grammar and thus regular expressions are not enough. You have to parse it to find out where the comments are. Dec 8, 2013 at 21:58
  • It will work in limited situations where you can be sure that your JSON does not contain any data with the comment string in it. Thank you for pointing out that limitation. I have edited the post. Dec 11, 2013 at 23:52
  • +1 for the link! Actually I think it is a good thing that comments are not supported because when sending data between a client and server, comments are definitively useless and pump lots of bandwidth for nothing. It's like someone who would ask to have comments in an MP3 structure or a JPEG data block... Jun 26, 2014 at 8:45
  • 1
    @AlexisWilke, "comments are definitively useless and pump lots of bandwidth for nothing" -- this is specifically why comments should be supported in the spec. Just look at the number of suggested workarounds that involve numerous different-but-similar ways of schlepping comments into the JSON as data, guaranteeing that a minification tool cannot remove the comments, guaranteeing that they get transmitted over the wire, and forcing the remote parser to deal with them with varying degrees of success. You try to force people ideologically, and they find ways around you. Just the way it is... Sep 15, 2014 at 7:11
  • 1
    @AlexisWilke at some point, though, doesn't all that seem a little bit like going to heroic lengths just to be able to put a comment in your JSON file? In my case, I just need a bit of code (not an entire C/C++ compiler, running wrapped in an extra runtime library, no less if running under Cygwin/Ming), to strip comments out before I can pass my configuration files through the JSON parser. I also detect when the config files change and dynamically reload them, etc. How lame is it that I can't simply put comments in the files and not worry about it? It's super lame. That's how much. ;-) Sep 16, 2014 at 23:45
12

You can use JSON with comments in it, if you load it as a text file, and then remove comments.

For example, you can use decomment library for that. Below is a complete example.

Input JSON (file input.js):

/*
* multi-line comments
**/
{
    "value": 123 // one-line comment
}

Test Application:

var decomment = require('decomment');
var fs = require('fs');

fs.readFile('input.js', 'utf8', function (err, data) {
    if (err) {
        console.log(err);
    } else {
        var text = decomment(data); // removing comments
        var json = JSON.parse(text); // parsing JSON
        console.log(json);
    }
});

Output:

{ value: 123 }

See also: gulp-decomment, grunt-decomment

2
  • 14
    It's not JSON anymore if you extend the language in custom ways that require a special preprocessor to handle.
    – user229044
    Sep 5, 2018 at 12:41
  • @meagar There was JSON5 spec, which supported comments, among other things. But in the end it never became standard.
    – vitaly-t
    Sep 5, 2018 at 12:45
11

json specs doesn't support comments BUT you can work around the problem by writing your comment as keys, like this

{
  "// my own comment goes here":"",
  "key1":"value 1",

  "// another comment goes here":"",
  "key 2": "value 2 here"
}

this way we are using the comment texts as keys ensuring (almost) that they are unique and they will not break any parsers. if some of your comments are not unique just add random numbers at the end.

if you need to parse comments to do any processing like stripping them you can fill the comment values with text indicating that it is a comment , like so:

   {
  "// my own comment goes here" : "_comment",
  "key1":"value 1",

  "// another comment goes here" : "_comment",
  "key 2": "value 2 here"
} 
  

this way a parser can find all comments and process them.

0
10

The JSON specification does not support comments, // or /* */ style.

But some JSON parsing libraries and IDEs support them.

Like:

  1. JSON5
  2. Visual Studio Code
  3. Commentjson
2
  • VS Code .jsonc FTW 🙌
    – Quang Van
    Jan 13, 2020 at 15:28
  • 1
    JSON5 isn't the fifth version of JSON. Oct 8, 2020 at 16:51
10

As the inventor of JSON said:

JSON does not have comments. A JSON encoder MUST NOT output comments. A JSON decoder MAY accept and ignore comments.

The utility includes a decoder that does allow "#"-style comments and so jq is one of several tools that can be used in conjunction with JSON-with-comments files, so long as such files are treated as "jq programs", rather than as JSON files. For example:

$ jq -ncf <(echo $'[1, # one\n2 ] # two') 
[1,2]

More importantly, jq can handle very large JSON-with-comments files as programs; this can be illustrated using a well-known JSON file:

$ ls -l JEOPARDY_QUESTIONS1.json
-rw-r--r--  2 xyzzy  staff  55554625 May 12  2016 JEOPARDY_QUESTIONS1.json

$ jq -nf JEOPARDY_QUESTIONS1.json | jq length
216930
9

Sigh. Why not just add fields, e.g.

{
    "note1" : "This demonstrates the provision of annotations within a JSON file",
    "field1" : 12,
    "field2" : "some text",

    "note2" : "Add more annotations as necessary"
}

Just make sure your "notex" names don't conflict with any real fields.

6
  • 10
    Just make sure your "notex" names don't conflict with any real fields. is the problem. This is not an arbitrary solution. May 14, 2014 at 14:42
  • 4
    This also presents the issue that the comments cannot be stripped out by a minification utility before transmission, unavoidably leading to bigger hunks of data being transmitted that serve no purpose on the other end of the transmission. I really feel like taking comment support out of the JSON spec is unfortunate. Specifically because people ARE going to hack solutions together. Taking the support out of the spec is an attempt at behavioral control that is simply going to fail and produce even bigger incompatibilities down the road due to proliferation of mutually-incompatible workarounds. Sep 15, 2014 at 7:07
  • 2
    in config files, I use {"/* ---- my section ----*/":0}. This is valid JSON, as JSON accepts any character in the key string. It will not collide with other properties and nobody cares or reordering. Still, 2 comments must not be the same.
    – olivr
    Apr 8, 2015 at 3:46
  • 3
    If you're using a schema to validate the JSON, it may fail due to the extra fields. Jun 26, 2015 at 0:30
  • 1
    Some object unmarshallers (e.g. Jackson, under some configurations) throw exceptions on unknown fields.
    – slim
    Oct 20, 2016 at 9:28
9

I just found "grunt-strip-json-comments".

“Strip comments from JSON. It lets you use comments in your JSON files!”

{
    // Rainbows
    "unicorn": /* ❤ */ "cake"
}
1
  • Might as well minify that JSON while you're at it. See @kyle-simpson's answer about JSON.minify.
    – user23987
    Aug 7, 2014 at 18:54
9

The Pure answer is No.

But some editors and platforms use workarounds to add comments to JSON.

1. Today most editors have built-in options and extensions to add comments to JSON documents. (eg:- VS Code also has a JSON with Comments (jsonc) mode / VS Code also has nice extensions for that)

Link to activate jsonc mode in VsCode

2. Some platforms provide built-in ways to add comments (impure json). (eg:- In firebase, I can comment firebase.jsons for a while without issue.

    {
    "hosting": {
        "headers": [
            /*{
              "source": "*.html",
              "headers": [
                {
                  "key": "Content-Security-Policy",
                  "value": "default-src 'self' ..."
                }
              ]
            },*/
        ]
      }
    }

3. In your own JSON parsing method, you can set a predefined key name as a comment.

eg:-

     {
        "comment" : "This is a comment",
        "//" :  "This also comment",
        "name" : "This is a real value"
     }
1
  • using .jsonc extension for vs code is a great option for simple use cases
    – dsg38
    Oct 6, 2021 at 10:35
8

There is a good solution (hack), which is valid JSON, but it will not work in all cases (see comments below). Just make the same key twice (or more). For example:

{
  "param" : "This is the comment place",
  "param" : "This is value place",
}

So JSON will understand this as:

{
  "param" : "This is value place",
}
9
  • 12
    This method may cause some troubles if anybody will loop through the object. On the first iteration the program will have no information that the entry is a comment.
    – user2073253
    Feb 12, 2014 at 20:24
  • 9
    RFC says: "The names within an object SHOULD be unique". See this error reported at: stackoverflow.com/questions/4912386/… Jun 10, 2014 at 15:59
  • 9
    Doing this is an invitation for creating JSON that blows up on you at some random point in the future.
    – user23987
    Aug 7, 2014 at 19:00
  • 7
    There is no guarantee that order matters in the list of object name/value pairs. A parser could parse them "out of order" and then this is broken. May 26, 2015 at 22:26
  • 3
    Behaviour of a JSON parser with this kind of code is undefined. There is nothing to say that the parser behaves as if only the last value was present. It could behave as if only the first value was present, or any value, or as if the value was an array.
    – gnasher729
    Oct 6, 2017 at 18:24
8

The practical answer for Visual Studio Code users in 2019 is to use the 'jsonc' extension.

It is practical, because that is the extension recognized by Visual Studio Code to indicate "JSON with comments". Please let me know about other editors/IDEs in the comments below.

It would be nice if Visual Studio Code and other editors would add native support for JSON5 as well, but for now Visual Studio Code only includes support for 'jsonc'.

(I searched through all the answers before posting this and none mention 'jsonc'.)

1
7

If your context is Node.js configuration, you might consider JavaScript via module.exports as an alternative to JSON:

module.exports = {
    "key": "value",

    // And with comments!
    "key2": "value2"
};

The require syntax will still be the same. Being JavaScript, the file extension should be .js.

1
  • I really thought there was no point going on to the second page of answers for this question but this is EXACTLY what I was looking for and works flawlessly! thanks.
    – rob
    Jun 1, 2017 at 14:04
7

I removed comments from JSON because I saw people were using them to hold parsing directives, a practice which would have destroyed interoperability.

-- Douglas Crockford

I removed JSON from my dependencies because I saw Douglas Crockford made it uncommentable, a practice which had destroyed interoperability.

-- Me

Conclusion: USE YAML

6

As many answers have already pointed out, JSON does not natively have comments. Of course sometimes you want them anyway. For Python, two ways to do that are with commentjson (# and // for Python 2 only) or json_tricks (# or // for Python 2 and Python 3), which has several other features. Disclaimer: I made json_tricks.

6

Although JSON does not support comments, JSONC does.

Name your file with '.jsonc' extension and use a jsonc parser.
Sorry if this answer was too late.

jsonWithComments.jsonc

Example:

{
    // This is a comment!
    "something": "idk"

}

If this is unclear, I think the bot is weird. Please try before voting this question as unhelpful.

2
5

You can use simple preprocessing via regular expressions. For instance, the following function will decode commented JSON in PHP:

function json_decode_commented ($data, $objectsAsArrays = false, $maxDepth = 512, $opts = 0) {
  $data = preg_replace('~
    (" (?:[^"\\\\] | \\\\\\\\ | \\\\")*+ ") | \# [^\v]*+ | // [^\v]*+ | /\* .*? \*/
  ~xs', '$1', $data);

  return json_decode($data, $objectsAsArrays, $maxDepth, $opts);
}

It supports all PHP-style comments: /*, #, //. String literals are preserved as is.

4

Yes, you can have comments. But I will not recommend whatever reason mentioned above.

I did some investigation, and I found all JSON require methods use the JSON.parse method. So I came to a solution: We can override or do monkey patching around JSON.parse.

Note: tested on Node.js only ;-)

var oldParse = JSON.parse;
JSON.parse = parse;
function parse(json){
    json = json.replace(/\/\*.+\*\//, function(comment){
        console.log("comment:", comment);
        return "";
    });
    return oldParse(json)
}

JSON file:

{
  "test": 1
  /* Hello, babe */
}
4
  • 2
    { what_if: "I happen to have /* slashes and asterisks */ in my data?" }
    – DSimon
    Dec 22, 2016 at 14:24
  • 3
    What I mean is, is most languages you don't have to worry about comment sequences inside strings. Even in a JSON implementation that supported comments, I would expect parsing my example to result in an object with the key "what_if" and the value "I happen to have /* slashes and asterisks */ in my data?", not "I happen to have in my data".
    – DSimon
    Dec 22, 2016 at 15:01
  • Using regex you can avoid data conversion to. What I understand, this should not be the case. JSON is used as a data not the language. So avoid garbage data or comments in data. :-D Most of the language, you write code that compiles in some other format. Here in JS, it is dynamically bind. There is no such type of compilation happens. V8 do some optimization, but that is also in push and failure method.
    – xdeepakv
    Dec 22, 2016 at 15:56
  • @DSimon I agree... this seems to work for many cases: json.replace(/("\/\/.*"|"\/\*(?:.|\n)*?")|(\/\/.*|\/\*(?:.|\n)*?\*\/)/g, "$1") regexr.com/3p39p May 8, 2018 at 4:36
4

Sure you can comment JSON. To read a commented JSON file from JavaScript you can strip comments before parsing it (see the code below). I'm sure this code can be improved, but it is easy to understand for those who use regular expressions.

I use commented JSON files to specify neuron shapes for my synthetic reflex systems. I also use commented JSON to store intermediate states for a running neuron system. It is very convenient to have comments. Don't listen to didacts who tell you they are a bad idea.

fetch(filename).then(function(response) {
    return response.text();
}).then(function(commented) {
    return commented.
        replace(/\/\*[\s\S]*?\*\/|([^\\:]|^)\/\/.*$/gm, '$1').
        replace(/\r/,"\n").
        replace(/\n[\n]+/,"\n");
}).then(function(clean) {
    return JSON.parse(clean);
}).then(function(json) {
    // Do what you want with the JSON object.
});
4

*.json files are generally used as configuration files or static data, thus the need of comments → some editors like NetBeans accept comments in *.json.

The problem is parsing content to an object. The solution is to always apply a cleaning function (server or client).

###PHP

 $rgx_arr = ["/\/\/[^\n]*/sim", "/\/\*.*?\*\//sim", "/[\n\r\t]/sim"];
 $valid_json_str = \preg_replace($rgx_arr, '', file_get_contents(path . 'a_file.json'));

###JavaScript

valid_json_str = json_str.replace(/\/\/[^\n]*/gim,'').replace(/\/\*.*?\*\//gim,'')
1
4

Well at the time of writing, appsettings.json supports comments.

e.g. (sample courtesy of Microsoft)

{
  "Logging": {
    "LogLevel": { // All providers, LogLevel applies to all the enabled providers.
      "Default": "Error", // Default logging, Error and higher.
      "Microsoft": "Warning" // All Microsoft* categories, Warning and higher.
    },
    "Debug": { // Debug provider.
      "LogLevel": {
        "Default": "Information", // Overrides preceding LogLevel:Default setting.
        "Microsoft.Hosting": "Trace" // Debug:Microsoft.Hosting category.
      }
    },
    "EventSource": { // EventSource provider
      "LogLevel": {
        "Default": "Warning" // All categories of EventSource provider.
      }
    }
  }
}
3

If you are using PHP, you can use this function to search for and remove // /* type comments from the JSON string before parsing it into an object/array:

function json_clean_decode($json, $assoc = true, $depth = 512, $options = 0) {
       // search and remove comments like /* */ and //
       $json = preg_replace("#(/\*([^*]|[\r\n]|(\*+([^*/]|[\r\n])))*\*+/)|([\s\t]//.*)|(^//.*)#", '', $json);

       if(version_compare(phpversion(), '5.4.0', '>=')) {
           $json = json_decode($json, $assoc, $depth, $options);
       }
       elseif(version_compare(phpversion(), '5.3.0', '>=')) {
           $json = json_decode($json, $assoc, $depth);
       }
       else {
           $json = json_decode($json, $assoc);
       }

       return $json;
   }

Hope this helps!

1
  • solution category == 'transform through preproc'
    – dreftymac
    Dec 4, 2016 at 12:59
2

You can use JSON-LD and the schema.org comment type to properly write comments:

{
    "https://schema.org/comment": "this is a comment"
}
2

"JSON doesn't have any documentation for comments"

But you can try this method to add comments,

By Adding key-value pairs with comments and descriptions:

{
"key": "some value",
"comments":"this is a comment"
"description":"this is some description of the comment defined above"
}

Reason: Why does JSON file not allow comments(by default)?

Because comments are usually added to source code to describe lines of code. JSON is purely about the data format to send, Hence It is not feasible to add comments to Json.

Hope it helps.

1
  • Why can't you use comments in JSON to describe the data? JSON is no longer used only for transmitting data, but also as config files. Aug 31, 2023 at 9:34
1

There are other libraries that are JSON compatible, which support comments.

One notable example is the "Hashcorp Language" (HCL)". It is written by the same people who made Vagrant, packer, consul, and vault.

1

Yes. You can put comments in a JSON file.

{
    "": "Location to post to",
    "postUrl": "https://example.com/upload/",

    "": "Username for basic auth",
    "username": "joebloggs",

    "": "Password for basic auth (note this is in clear, be sure to use HTTPS!",
    "password": "bloejoggs"
}

A comment is simply a piece of text describing the purpose of a block of code or configuration. And because you can specify keys multiple times in JSON, you can do it like this. It's syntactically correct and the only tradeoff is you'll have an empty key with some garbage value in your dictionary (which you could trim...)

I saw this question years and years ago but I only just saw this done like this in a project I'm working on and I thought this was a really clean way to do it. Enjoy!

8
  • 2
    N.B. "The names within an object SHOULD be unique." (Source: IETF JSON Spec, December 2017
    – Rounin
    Jun 15, 2020 at 16:54
  • 1
    SHOULD means something different to MUST in a spec. The other answers with comments will break every JSON parser out there. I'd be interested to know if duplicate keys has any bad side effects anywhere.
    – nevelis
    Jun 15, 2020 at 21:56
  • My point (merely) was not that the names within an object MUST be unique, simply that they SHOULD be unique. After scouring Stack Overflow (and the wider web) for over a day, I have done my best to come up with my own approach.
    – Rounin
    Jun 15, 2020 at 22:21
  • 1
    Ahh, that's an interesting approach... It requires custom logic to parse, and it moves the comments away from the thing it's describing... ?
    – nevelis
    Jun 15, 2020 at 22:57
  • 1
    It requires a custom-written reader if you want to see the comments in the right place. Otherwise (ie. normally) there is simply a block of comments at the bottom of the JSON, at root level, with a reserved name, which can be safely ignored and left alone.
    – Rounin
    Jun 15, 2020 at 23:00
1

I came across this problem in my current project as I have quite a bit of JSON that requires some commenting to keep things easy to remember.

I've used this simple Python function to replace comments & use json.loads to convert it into a dict:

import json, re

def parse_json(data_string):
  result = []
  for line in data_string.split("\n"):
    line = line.strip()
    if len(line) < 1 or line[0:2] == "//":
      continue
    if line[-1] not in "\,\"\'":
      line = re.sub("\/\/.*?$", "", line)
    result.append(line)
  return json.loads("\n".join(result))

print(parse_json("""
{
  // This is a comment
  "name": "value" // so is this
  // "name": "value"
  // the above line gets removed
}
"""))
1

I searched all pages of answers, and none mention this about JSON syntax highlighting on GitHub or on Stack Overflow, although this answer comes close.

Some JSON parsers accept C++-style comments. To trigger them when writing markdown on GitHub or Stack Overflow, for instance, you can specify the syntax highlighting type as jsonc. Example:

This:

```jsonc
// C++-style comment here
{
    "*.md": {
        "softwrap": true
    },
    "colorcolumn": 80,
    "savecursor": true,
    "scrollbar": true,
    "scrollspeed": 5,
    "softwrap": true,
    "wordwrap": true
}
```

Produces this:

// C++-style comment here
{
    "*.md": {
        "softwrap": true
    },
    "colorcolumn": 80,
    "savecursor": true,
    "scrollbar": true,
    "scrollspeed": 5,
    "softwrap": true,
    "wordwrap": true
}

As the answer I reference above mentions, you can then parse JSON which has C (/* */) and C++ (//) style comments using the amazing nlohmann json C++ library.

It is here: https://github.com/nlohmann/json

The single header file you need is here: https://github.com/nlohmann/json/blob/develop/include/nlohmann/json.hpp

That library says this: https://github.com/nlohmann/json#comments-in-json:

Comments in JSON

This library does not support comments by default. It does so for three reasons:

  1. Comments are not part of the JSON specification. You may argue that // or /* */ are allowed in JavaScript, but JSON is not JavaScript.
  2. This was not an oversight: Douglas Crockford wrote on this in May 2012:

I removed comments from JSON because I saw people were using them to hold parsing directives, a practice which would have destroyed interoperability. I know that the lack of comments makes some people sad, but it shouldn't.

Suppose you are using JSON to keep configuration files, which you would like to annotate. Go ahead and insert all the comments you like. Then pipe it through JSMin before handing it to your JSON parser.

  1. It is dangerous for interoperability if some libraries would add comment support while others don't. Please check The Harmful Consequences of the Robustness Principle on this.

However, you can pass set parameter ignore_comments to true in the parse function to ignore // or /* */ comments. Comments will then be treated as whitespace.

ignore_comments is a bool and is the last parameter passed to the nlohmann::json::parse() function. See here: https://json.nlohmann.me/api/basic_json/parse/

References:

  1. https://gist.github.com/DamianEdwards/31d2457737304ca73556?permalink_comment_id=3574928#gistcomment-3574928
1

I think there is no such way. IDE says this too. It's just unsupported enter image description here

0

I really like @eli 's approach, there are over 30 answers but no one has mentioned lists (array). So using @eli 's approach we could do something like:

"part_of_speech": {
  "__comment": [
    "@param {String} type - the following types can be used: ",
      "NOUN, VERB, ADVERB, ADJECTIVE, PRONOUN, PREPOSITION",
      "CONJUNCTION, INTERJECTION, NUMERAL, PARTICLE, PHRASE",
    "@param {String} type_free_form - is optional, can be empty string",
    "@param {String} description - is optional, can be empty string",
    "@param {String} source - is optional, can be empty string"
  ],
  "type": "NOUN",
  "type_free_form": "noun",
  "description": "",
  "source": "https://google.com",
  "noun_class": {
    "__comment": [
      "@param {String} noun_class - the following types can be used: ",
        "1_class, 2_class, 3_class, 4_class, 5_class, 6_class"
    ],
    "noun_class": "4_class"
  }
}
0

As JSON codes look, It is mostly unnecessary to add comments inside, as you should make use of proper naming convention to make your keys name understandable and descriptive based on values you have to assign it.

I am not saying that comments in JSON is totally bad practice, But IMO, you should get it descriptive or consider it on the top of code as usual, instead of getting comments inside. Because it uglify our beautiful code.

"good-stuff" : {
  "descriptive-stuff1" : "I am understandable",
  "descriptive-stuff2" : [ "okay", "awesome" ]
}

Sorry for getting out of topic a little bit, Happy coding!

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