222

I have the following enum defined:

from enum import Enum
class D(Enum):
    x = 1
    y = 2

print(D.x)

now the printed value is

D.x

instead, I wanted the enum's value to be print

1

What can be done to achieve this functionality?

1
  • 1
    I should clarify the access parameters, I know the D.x.value thing, what I want is D.x string conversion to return the value, sorry if question doesn't make the condition clear. Jun 30, 2014 at 10:15

5 Answers 5

368

You are printing the enum object. Use the .value attribute if you wanted just to print that:

print(D.x.value)

See the Programmatic access to enumeration members and their attributes section:

If you have an enum member and need its name or value:

>>>
>>> member = Color.red
>>> member.name
'red'
>>> member.value
1

You could add a __str__ method to your enum, if all you wanted was to provide a custom string representation:

class D(Enum):
    def __str__(self):
        return str(self.value)

    x = 1
    y = 2

Demo:

>>> from enum import Enum
>>> class D(Enum):
...     def __str__(self):
...         return str(self.value)
...     x = 1
...     y = 2
... 
>>> D.x
<D.x: 1>
>>> print(D.x)
1
7
  • When I compare it with a integer value, it returns as object. Ex: if D.x == 10: .... What approach should I take for integers?
    – alper
    Apr 24, 2020 at 18:49
  • 1
    @alper: exactly the same way; D.x is the enum object, D.x.value is an integer value. If you must have the enum values act like integers, use the IntEnum type, where each element is a subclass of int and so IntEnumD.x == 10 would work.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Apr 26, 2020 at 12:05
  • I have added def __eq__(self, other): return int(self.value) == other and def __int__(self): return int(self.value) but still I think I have to use .value on cases when I don't use comparing
    – alper
    Apr 26, 2020 at 12:10
  • 1
    @alper: that __eq__ implementation doesn't work when other is another enum value; D.x == D.y, where D.x.value == D.y.value would be true, would fail for example. It sounds like you want to use IntEnum instead of Enum there.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Apr 26, 2020 at 12:30
  • 1
    @Greg7000: what are you using .value for? If you have a ...(str, Enum) enum, your members are already strings so anything that accepts a string can use that directly for most contexts. E.g. f"The member is: {MyEnumClass.membername}", etc. You can always add your own __str__ method for those contexts that call .__str__() (like print()).
    – Martijn Pieters
    Mar 30, 2022 at 11:18
24

I implemented access using the following

class D(Enum):
    x = 1
    y = 2

    def __str__(self):
        return '%s' % self.value

now I can just do

print(D.x) to get 1 as result.

You can also use self.name in case you wanted to print x instead of 1.

3
  • 8
    Why the string formatting and self._value_? return str(self.value) is more straightforward.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Jun 30, 2014 at 10:18
  • 1
    I just looked at the source and this was how it is implemented, however you are right and self.value is cleaner. Jun 30, 2014 at 10:20
  • 3
    The single-underscore attributes are internal to the generated enum class; better stick to the documented attribute (which happens to be a special descriptor so that you can still use value as a name on your enum type).
    – Martijn Pieters
    Jun 30, 2014 at 10:28
12

If you are going to print value using f-string then you can inherit your enum from both Enum and str. This way you can have both value and name of the object. For instance:

from enum import Enum


class D(str, Enum):
    x = 1
    y = 2

print(D.x)
print(f"{D.x}")

Outputs:

D.x
1

Inheriting just from Enum will always give a full qualified name.

class D(Enum):
    x = 1
    y = 2

print(D.x)
print(f"{D.x}")

Output

D.x
D.x

This is opposite to if you not inherit from anything where you will get value instead of name:

class D:
    x = 1
    y = 2


print(D.x)
print(f"{D.x}")

Output

1
1

That is why inheriting from both str and Enum you are getting both full qualified name and the value.

3
  • is this definition of yours equivalent to : class D(Enum, str): x = 1 y = 2
    – udit
    Aug 16, 2022 at 10:36
  • I like this answer the most. But I fail to understand why print(D.x) prints D.x whereas print(f"{D.x}") prints the actual value 1. @Vlad may I kindly ask you to elaborate a bit more on your answer. Additionally, why does str(D.x) also returns D.x? Thanks in advance.
    – gmagno
    Sep 22, 2022 at 19:06
  • @gmagno, I updated the answer. Please take a look. Sep 24, 2022 at 12:53
4

In case you want to compare your enum members to Int values, a better way to do it would be to extend IntEnum:

from enum import IntEnum


class D(IntEnum):
    x = 1
    y = 2


print(D.x)

In this way you can compare values of your enum against integers without explicitly calling .value:

>>> D.x == 1
True

For more information you can check this part of the Python docs: Enum comparisons

1
  • I guess this answer should be the correct solution since the answer of @Martijn Pieters returns the “position value” which happens to be identical with the assign value. If x would be assigned to 5, D.x would return 1 anyways and not 5.
    – Ling
    Mar 25, 2022 at 18:27
3

The most straightforward dunder method to use is _repr_ instead of _str_ since it will also allow you to print it in that way also in lists.

class D(Enum):
  x = 1
  y = 2

  def __repr__(self):
      return self.value

print([D.x,D.y])
>>> [1, 2]
1
  • 1
    It will still print D.x if you use print(D.x) Nov 23, 2021 at 11:43

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