50

I want to write a function that reads a list [1,5,3,6,...] and gives [1,1,5,5,3,3,6,6,...]. Any idea how to do it?

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  • 6
    Sounds homeworkish. There are better ways to work with a list than duplicating the elements. – S.Lott Mar 15 '10 at 17:28
  • I know this question is over 10 years old, but I really hate these "sounds homeworkish" comments. Who cares where the requirement came from? An example where this is used in the "real world" is, for example, where you need increase the size of data for testing when you only have a preliminatry sample but need to see how it performs on bigger lists. – cdabel Apr 30 at 20:32

11 Answers 11

72
>>> a = range(10)
>>> [val for val in a for _ in (0, 1)]
[0, 0, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4, 5, 5, 6, 6, 7, 7, 8, 8, 9, 9]

N.B. _ is traditionally used as a placeholder variable name where you do not want to do anything with the contents of the variable. In this case it is just used to generate two values for every time round the outer loop.

To turn this from a list into a generator replace the square brackets with round brackets.

3
  • 1
    _ is, these days, used for i18n/l10n (google). I still tend to use it if I know there won't be an i18n in this module. Else I (would) use __ (two underscores). – Jürgen A. Erhard Mar 15 '10 at 17:59
  • 9
    I'd go with range(2) over (0, 1) for clarity's sake – hallo Jul 25 '18 at 1:58
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    @M.I.Wright I tried for _ in (_, _) to counter your clarity, but fortunately it does not work. – Guimoute May 1 '20 at 14:16
17
>>> a = [1, 2, 3]
>>> b = []
>>> for i in a:
    b.extend([i, i])


>>> b
[1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3]

or

>>> [a[i//2] for i in range(len(a)*2)]
[1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3]
2
  • You should use // for floor division in Python 2, too. – Mike Graham Mar 15 '10 at 17:32
  • @Mike: sure you right, except of course in / division insures that int is returned. – SilentGhost Mar 15 '10 at 17:38
11

If you already have the roundrobin recipe described in the documentation for itertools—and it is quite handy—then you can just use

roundrobin(my_list, my_list)
0
11

I would use zip and itertools.chain.

>>> import itertools
>>> l = [1,5,3,6,16]
>>> list(itertools.chain(*zip(l,l)))
[1, 1, 5, 5, 3, 3, 6, 6, 16, 16]

Note: I only used list to consume the generator to make it fit for printing. You probably don't need the list call in your code...

9

numpy.repeat does what you want:

import numpy as np
yourList = [1,5,3,6]
n = 2
list(np.repeat(yourList, n))

result:

[1, 1, 5, 5, 3, 3, 6, 6]

If you don't mind using numpy arrays you can also omit the list() call in the last line.

5

With a little slicing...

>>> a = [3, 1, 4, 1, 5]
>>> a[:0] = a[::2] = a[1::2] = a[:]
>>> a
[3, 3, 1, 1, 4, 4, 1, 1, 5, 5]
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    It works, but can you explain why? For instance inspecting a[1::2] = a[:] yields ValueError: attempt to assign sequence of size 5 to extended slice of size 2. – Friedrich Jun 19 '20 at 18:56
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    Similar b=a*2; b[::2]=a; b[1::2]=a. – Friedrich Jun 19 '20 at 21:11
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    @Friedrich The targets get assigned left to right, so a[:0] gets assigned first and this resizes a as needed for the following two assignments to work. – Stefan Pochmann Jun 19 '20 at 23:07
  • I provided an explanation of this hack here: stackoverflow.com/a/67241399/2111778 – xjcl Apr 29 at 9:34
2

I would use

import itertools
foo = [1, 5, 3, 6]
new = itertools.chain.from_iterable([item, item] for item in foo)

new will be an iterator that lazily iterates over the duplicated items. If you need the actual list computed, you can do list(new) or use one of the other solutions.

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  • 2
    or shorter: itertools.chain.from_iterable(itertools.izip(foo, foo)) – Antony Hatchkins Mar 15 '10 at 17:56
  • I considered that code which is shorter but didn't seem clearer to me. – Mike Graham Mar 15 '10 at 18:34
2

One can use zip and flat the list

a = [3, 1, 4, 1, 5]
sum(zip(a,a), ())   # (3, 3, 1, 1, 4, 4, 1, 1, 5, 5)

The output is a tuple, but conversion to a list is easy. Regarding flatting a tuple with sum see https://stackoverflow.com/a/952946/11769765 and python: flat zip.

1

For as much as Guido dislikes the functional operators, they can be pretty darned handy:

>>> from operator import add
>>> a = range(10)
>>> b = reduce(add, [(x,x) for x in a])
3
  • In the case of reduce, handy often means amazingly slow. It's important to measure what reduce is doing. Often, it's shocking how much computation reduce forces. – S.Lott Mar 15 '10 at 19:40
  • I made a test script with every one of the methods on this page with the baselist = range(10) and 1,000,000 iterations. The slowest took 5.094 seconds and the fastest took 3.622 seconds. My reduce example took 3.906 seconds. – Kirk Strauser Mar 15 '10 at 20:05
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    range(10) is tiny, so the complexity pays a small role. This solution is quadratic; all the others I see here are linear. Also, some of the others seem more readable to me. – Mike Graham Mar 15 '10 at 20:57
1

It is possible use list multiplication. Case you need each list member together just use sorted method.

>>> lst = [1,2,3,4]
>>> sorted(lst*2)
[1,1,2,2,3,3,4,4]
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    What about if you want to keep the order of the original list? What about if the the items in the list are unorderable? – Moberg Feb 19 '18 at 13:40
  • Nice solution for sorted input. – Friedrich Jun 19 '20 at 16:55
1

For a more general approach you could go with a list comprehension and a factor term.

Example

sample_list = [1,2,3,4,5]
factor = 2
new_list = [entry for entry in sample_list for _ in range(factor)]

Out:

>>> new_list
[1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4, 5, 5]

Changing the factor variable will change how many entry of each item in the list you will have in the new list.

You could also wrap it up in a function:

def multiply_list_entries(list_, factor = 1):

    list_multiplied = [entry for entry in list_ for _ in range(factor)]
    return list_multiplied

>>> multiply_list_entries(sample_list, factor = 3)
[1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5]

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