7

The example to show the problem:

  • having a number 105;
  • divide with 1000 (result 0.105)
  • rouded to 2 decimal places should be: 0.11

Now, several scripts - based on answers to another questions:

This is mostly recommented and mostly upvoted solution is using printf.

use 5.014;
use warnings;
my $i = 105;
printf "%.2f\n", $i/1000;   #prints 0.10

but prints a wrong result. In the comment to https://stackoverflow.com/a/1838885 @Sinan Unur says (6 times upvoted comment):

Use sprintf("%.3f", $value) for mathematical purposes too.

but, it didn't works "sometimes"... like above.

The another recommented solution Math::BigFloat:

use 5.014;
use warnings;
use Math::BigFloat;
my $i = 105;

Math::BigFloat->precision(-2);
my $r = Math::BigFloat->new($i/1000);

say "$r";   #0.10 ;(

Wrong result too. Another recommened one bignum:

use 5.014;
use warnings;
use bignum ( p => -2 );
my $i = 105;
my $r = $i/1000;
say "$r";   #0.10 ;(

wrong again. ;(

Now the working ones:

use 5.014;
use warnings;
use Math::Round;
my $i = 105;
say nearest(0.01, $i/1000); #GREAT prints 0.11 :)

good result 0.11, however a comment here https://stackoverflow.com/a/571740 complains about it.

and finally another recommendation "by my own" function:

use 5.014;
use warnings;
my $i = 105;
my $f = $i/1000;

say myround($f,2);  # 0.11

sub myround {
    my($float, $prec) = @_;
    my $f = $float * (10**$prec);
    my $r = int($f + $f/abs($f*2));
    return $r/(10**$prec);
}

prints 0.11 too, but can't prove it's correctness.

For the reference I was read:

I understand than it is common problem to all languages, but please, after all above reading - I still have this question:

What is the error-proof way in perl to round a floating point number to N decimal places - with mathematically correct way, e.g. what will round results like 105/1000 correctly to N decimal places without "surprises"...

  • Personally I would always rely on database like Pg/Oracle for this type of calculation. – Сухой27 Jun 30 '14 at 15:19
  • 3
    I should point out that in your Math::Bigfloat solution you passed a common floating point number into the new(), meaning that it was too late to solve your problem. You should probably make a Bigfloat out of a (pre-division) integer so as to allow Bigfloat's division method to give you something that you can work with. – tjd Jun 30 '14 at 15:21
  • +1 for tjd's comment. I would have thought (happy to be proven wrong) that if you use Math::Bigfloat correctly, it will be error-proof – matt freake Jun 30 '14 at 15:44
  • There is no error proof way to do anything at all with fp numbers, except to store numbers that can be represented by n/2^m, or perform calculations on those numbers where the internal state is always representable by n/2^m, as well as the result. Otherwise, error is inherent in the storage format. – DavidO Jun 30 '14 at 15:48
6

In the old Integer math days of programming, we use to pretend to use decimal places:

N = 345
DISPLAY N        # Displays 345
DISPLAY (1.2) N  # Displays 3.45

We learned a valuable trick when attempting to round sales taxes correctly:

my $amount = 1.344;
my $amount_rounded = sprintf "%.2f", $amount + .005;
my $amount2 = 1.345;
my $amount_rounded2 = sprintf "%.2f", $amount2 + .005;
say "$amount_rounted   $amount_rounded2";  # prints 1.34 and 1.35

By adding in 1/2 of the precision, I display the rounding correctly. When the number is 1.344, adding .005 made it 1.349, and chopping off the last digit displays dip lays 1.344. When I do the same thing with 1.345, adding in .005 makes it 1.350 and removing the last digit displays it as 1.35.

You could do this with a subroutine that will return the rounded amount.


Interesting...

There is a PerlFAQ on this subject. It recommends simply using printf to get the correct results:

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw(say);

my $number = .105;
say "$number";
printf "%.2f\n", $number;   # Prints .10 which is incorrect
printf "%.2f\n", 3.1459;    # Prins 3.15 which is correct

For Pi, this works, but not for .105. However:

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw(say);

my $number = .1051;
say "$number";
printf "%.2f\n", $number;   # Prints .11 which is correct
printf "%.2f\n", 3.1459;    # Prints 3.15 which is correct

This looks like an issue with the way Perl stores .105 internally. Probably something like .10499999999 which would be correctly rounded downwards. I also noticed that Perl warns me about using round and rounding as possible future reserved words.

  • The FAQ says you can use sprintf to fix the error, but the OP is using sprintf to round without first fixing the error. – ikegami Jun 30 '14 at 16:16
  • 2
    I didn't see anything in the FAQ about having to fix the error. The FAQ says to use printf and sprintf for rounding. Perl displays the number as .105, but then sprintf doesn't round what is displayed, but .104999... instead. – David W. Jun 30 '14 at 21:33
  • (That's not pi. 3.14159...) – Jim Davis Jun 30 '14 at 22:55
  • I just took your word for it. Allow me to rephrase: You say the FAQ says you can use sprintf to fix the error, but the OP is using sprintf to round without first fixing the error. – ikegami Jul 1 '14 at 7:13
  • 2
    The FAQ exactly says: For rounding to a certain number of digits, sprintf() or printf() is usually the easiest route. . Because (IMHO) all users want get correct result, this is a bad advice in a FAQ. The only solution is using own rounding function, as the FAQ says later: In these cases, it probably pays not to trust whichever system of rounding is being used by Perl, but instead to implement the rounding function you need yourself. So, (unfortunately) the sprintf advice is bad (IMHO). – kobame Jul 1 '14 at 9:34
11

You're expecting a specific behaviour when the number is exactly 0.105, but floating point errors mean you can't expect a number to be exactly what you think it is.

105/1000 is a periodic number in binary just like 1/3 is periodic in decimal.

105/1000
       ____________________
= 0.00011010111000010100011 (bin)

~ 0.00011010111000010100011110101110000101000111101011100001 (bin)

= 0.10499999999999999611421941381195210851728916168212890625

0.1049999... is less than 0.105, so it rounds to 0.10.

But even if you had 0.105 exactly, that would still round to 0.10 since sprintf rounds half to even. A better test is 155/1000

155/1000
       ____________________
= 0.00100111101011100001010 (bin)

~ 0.0010011110101110000101000111101011100001010001111010111 (bin)

= 0.1549999999999999988897769753748434595763683319091796875

0.155 should round to 0.16, but it rounds to 0.15 due to floating point error.

$ perl -E'$_ = 155; say sprintf("%.2f", $_/1000);'
0.15

$ perl -E'$_ = 155; say sprintf("%.0f", $_/10)/100;'
0.16

The second one works because 5/10 isn't periodic, and therein lies the solution. As Sinan Unur said, you can correct the error by using sprintf. But you have to round to an integer if you don't want to lose your work.

$ perl -E'
   $_ = 155/1000;

   $_ *= 1000;                # Move decimal point past significant.
   $_ = sprintf("%.0f", $_);  # Fix floating-point error.
   $_ /= 10;                  # 5/10 is not periodic
   $_ = sprintf("%.0f", $_);  # Do our rounding.
   $_ /= 100;                 # Restore decimal point.

   say;
'
0.16

That will fix the rounding error, allowing sprintf to properly round half to even.

0.105  =>  0.10
0.115  =>  0.12
0.125  =>  0.12
0.135  =>  0.14
0.145  =>  0.14
0.155  =>  0.16
0.165  =>  0.16

If you want to round half up instead, you'll need to using something other than sprintf to do the final rounding. Or you could add s/5\z/6/; before the division by 10.


But that's complicated.

The first sentence of the answer is key. You're expecting a specific behaviour when the number is exactly 0.105, but floating point errors mean you can't expect a number to be exactly what you think it is. The solution is to introduce a tolerance. That's what rounding using sprintf does, but it's a blunt tool.

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw( say );

use POSIX qw( ceil floor );

sub round_half_up {
   my ($num, $places, $tol) = @_;

   my $mul = 1; $mul *= 10 for 1..$places;
   my $sign = $num >= 0 ? +1 : -1;

   my $scaled = $num * $sign * $mul;
   my $frac = $scaled - int($scaled);

   if ($sign >= 0) {
      if ($frac < 0.5-$tol) {
         return floor($scaled) / $mul;
      } else {
         return ceil($scaled) / $mul;
      }
   } else {
      if ($frac < 0.5+$tol) {
         return -floor($scaled) / $mul;
      } else {
         return -ceil($scaled) / $mul;
      }
   }
}

say sprintf '%5.2f', round_half_up( 0.10510000, 2, 0.00001);  #  0.11
say sprintf '%5.2f', round_half_up( 0.10500001, 2, 0.00001);  #  0.11  Within tol
say sprintf '%5.2f', round_half_up( 0.10500000, 2, 0.00001);  #  0.11  Within tol
say sprintf '%5.2f', round_half_up( 0.10499999, 2, 0.00001);  #  0.11  Within tol
say sprintf '%5.2f', round_half_up( 0.10410000, 2, 0.00001);  #  0.10
say sprintf '%5.2f', round_half_up(-0.10410000, 2, 0.00001);  # -0.10
say sprintf '%5.2f', round_half_up(-0.10499999, 2, 0.00001);  # -0.10  Within tol
say sprintf '%5.2f', round_half_up(-0.10500000, 2, 0.00001);  # -0.10  Within tol
say sprintf '%5.2f', round_half_up(-0.10500001, 2, 0.00001);  # -0.10  Within tol
say sprintf '%5.2f', round_half_up(-0.10510000, 2, 0.00001);  # -0.11

There's probably existing solutions that work along the same lines.

  • HUH! ;) Really detailed answer. Thank you. So, in the result: a.) Can't rely on the printf/sprintf, because it is not doing correct rounding after the decimal point b.) should use everytime such above round_half_up function to get the correct result. – kobame Jul 1 '14 at 9:39
  • @kobame I think your a. is incorrect. printf/sprintf will do the right thing with what you give it. Not understanding the limitations of binary floating point numbers can lead a programmer to overestimate the accuracy of what they are feeding to printf/sprintf – tjd Jul 25 '14 at 13:44
  • @tjd, "printf/sprintf will do the right thing with what you give it.", What are you talking about? He specifically asked to replace printf "%.2f\n", $i/1000 because it doesn't do what he wants. – ikegami Jul 25 '14 at 13:47
  • @ikegami, I thought I was supporting your point that printf will behave as expected when handed 0.10499999999999999611421941381195210851728916168212890625. Am I incorrect? – tjd Jul 25 '14 at 14:06
  • @tjd Sorry, an normal (or call them oridinary/common/stupid) people for the printf "%.2f", 155/1000 really want to get 0.16 and not 0.15. Sry. Please understand and accept the fact, than not everybody who making some simple scripts in perl is an computer-expert who know in the details how are floating point numbers are stored. Ikegami's answer is GREAT because explained many things, but that doesn't change the fact = can't rely on printf (because sometimes give a wrong result). The link on my question is has a great comparison, this is not only perl's problem. ;) – kobame Jul 25 '14 at 19:38
3

Your custom function should mostly work as expected. Here's how it works and how you can verify it's correct:

sub myround {
    my($float, $prec) = @_;

    # Prevent div-by-zero later on
    if ($float == 0) { return 0; }

    # Moves the decimal $prec places to the right
    # Example: $float = 1.234, $prec = 2
    #   $f = $float * 10^2;
    #   $f = $float * 100;
    #   $f = 123.4;
    my $f = $float * (10**$prec);

    # Round 0.5 away from zero using $f/abs($f*2)
    #   if $f is positive, "$f/abs($f*2)" becomes  0.5
    #   if $f is negative, "$f/abs($f*2)" becomes -0.5
    #   if $f is zero, we have a problem (hence the earlier if statement)
    # In our example:
    #   $f = 123.4 + (123.4 / (123.4 * 2));
    #   $f = 123.4 + (0.5);
    #   $f = 123.9;
    # Then we truncate to integer:
    #   $r = int(123.9);
    #   $f = 123;
    my $r = int($f + $f/abs($f*2));

    # Lastly, we shift the deciaml back to where it should be:
    #   $r / 10^2
    #   $r / 100
    #   123 / 100
    #   return 1.23;
    return $r/(10**$prec);
}

However, the following it will throw an error for $float = 0, so there's an additional if statement at the beginning.

The nice thing about the above function is that it's possible to round to negative decimal places, allowing you round to the left of the decimal. For example, myround(123, -2) will give 100.

2

I'd add use bignum to your original code example.

use 5.014;
use warnings;
use bignum;

my $i = 105;                # Parsed as Math::BigInt
my $r = $i / 1000;          # Overloaded division produces Math::BigFloat
say $r->ffround(-2, +inf);  # Avoid using printf and the resulting downgrade to common float.

This solves the error you made in your use Math::BigFloat example by parsing your numbers into objects imediately and not waiting for you to pass the results of a round off error into Math::BigFloat->new

  • I'm probably missed something from your answer, because this script prints for me 0.10 too, and not the correct 0.11. – kobame Jul 1 '14 at 9:23
  • @kobame, you were right. I made the mistake of allowing printf to downgrade the object to a common float. Fixed. – tjd Jul 1 '14 at 12:12
0

According to my experience, Perl printf/sprintf uses wrong algorithm. I made this conclusion considering at least the following simple example:

# The same floating part for both numbers (*.8830 or *.8829) is expected in the rounded value, but it is different for some reason:
printf("%.4f\n", "7.88295"); # gives 7.8830
printf("%.4f\n", "8.88295"); # gives 8.8829

The integer part should not have any influence in this example, but it has. I got this result with Perl 5.8.8.

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