38

I want to count the number of letters, digits and special characters in the following string:

let phrase = "The final score was 32-31!"

I tried:

for tempChar in phrase {
    if (tempChar >= "a" && tempChar <= "z") {
       letterCounter++
    }
// etc.

but I'm getting errors. I tried all sorts of other variations on this - still getting error - such as:

could not find an overload for '<=' that accepts the supplied arguments

5 Answers 5

57

For Swift 5 see rustylepord's answer.

Update for Swift 3:

let letters = CharacterSet.letters
let digits = CharacterSet.decimalDigits

var letterCount = 0
var digitCount = 0

for uni in phrase.unicodeScalars {
    if letters.contains(uni) {
        letterCount += 1
    } else if digits.contains(uni) {
        digitCount += 1
    }
}

(Previous answer for older Swift versions)

A possible Swift solution:

var letterCounter = 0
var digitCount = 0
let phrase = "The final score was 32-31!"
for tempChar in phrase.unicodeScalars {
    if tempChar.isAlpha() {
        letterCounter++
    } else if tempChar.isDigit() {
        digitCount++
    }
}

Update: The above solution works only with characters in the ASCII character set, i.e. it does not recognize Ä, é or ø as letters. The following alternative solution uses NSCharacterSet from the Foundation framework, which can test characters based on their Unicode character classes:

let letters = NSCharacterSet.letterCharacterSet()
let digits = NSCharacterSet.decimalDigitCharacterSet()

var letterCount = 0
var digitCount = 0

for uni in phrase.unicodeScalars {
    if letters.longCharacterIsMember(uni.value) {
        letterCount++
    } else if digits.longCharacterIsMember(uni.value) {
        digitCount++
    }
}

Update 2: As of Xcode 6 beta 4, the first solution does not work anymore, because the isAlpha() and related (ASCII-only) methods have been removed from Swift. The second solution still works.

10
  • yep, that's perfect - how the hell did you find out about "isAlpha" and "isDigit"????? :-) I didn't even know those existed. (Seriously - did you look them up or did you already run into them in prior travels?)
    – sirab333
    Jul 1, 2014 at 5:13
  • 1
    @sirab333: isalpha() and friends are well known in C, see e.g. developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/System/Conceptual/…. So I had "only" to figure out how to use them from Swift. - But note that this works only for ASCII characters. It does not recognize letters from "foreign languages" such as "ä", "è" or "ø".
    – Martin R
    Jul 1, 2014 at 5:27
  • and it recognizes + and - as digit Jul 1, 2014 at 5:55
  • Interesting. I never had any C, C#, C++ or any other C - I jumped right into Objective-C and never looked back. All in all then, would you say this is a "legitimate" solution - or is there a more "pure" Swift-only way to do this, without any C involved?
    – sirab333
    Jul 1, 2014 at 6:26
  • @ChristianDietrich: Are you sure? My test does not confirm this.
    – Martin R
    Jul 1, 2014 at 7:14
5

Use the values of unicodeScalars

let phrase = "The final score was 32-31!"
var letterCounter = 0, digitCounter = 0
for scalar in phrase.unicodeScalars {
    let value = scalar.value
    if (value >= 65 && value <= 90) || (value >= 97 && value <= 122) {++letterCounter}
    if (value >= 48 && value <= 57) {++digitCounter}
}
println(letterCounter)
println(digitCounter)
3

For Swift 5 you can do the following for simple strings, but be vigilant about handling characters like "1️⃣" , "④" these would be treated as numbers as well.

let phrase = "The final score was 32-31!"

var numberOfDigits = 0;
var numberOfLetters = 0;
var numberOfSymbols = 0;

phrase.forEach {

    if ($0.isNumber) {
        numberOfDigits += 1;
    }
    else if ($0.isLetter)  {
        numberOfLetters += 1
    }
    else if ($0.isSymbol || $0.isPunctuation || $0.isCurrencySymbol || $0.isMathSymbol) {
        numberOfSymbols += 1;
    }
}

print(#"\#(numberOfDigits)  || \#(numberOfLetters) || \#(numberOfSymbols)"#);
0

I've created a short extension for letter and digits count for a String

extension String {
  var letterCount : Int {
    return self.unicodeScalars.filter({ CharacterSet.letters.contains($0) }).count
  }

  var digitCount : Int {
   return self.unicodeScalars.filter({ CharacterSet.decimalDigits.contains($0) }).count
  }
}

or a function to get a count for any CharacterSet you put in

extension String {    
  func characterCount(for set: CharacterSet) -> Int {
    return self.unicodeScalars.filter({ set.contains($0) }).count
  }
}

usage:

let phrase = "the final score is 23-13!"
let letterCount = phrase.characterCount(for: .letters)
0

In case you only need one information (letter or number or sign) you can do it in one line:

let phrase = "The final score was 32-31!"

let count = phrase.filter{ $0.isLetter }.count
print(count) // "16\n"

But doing phrase.filter several times is inefficient because it loops through the whole string.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.