1055

I have an array like this:

var arr1 = ["a", "b", "c", "d"];

How can I randomize / shuffle it?

49 Answers 49

2

Randomize array

 var arr = ['apple','cat','Adam','123','Zorro','petunia']; 
 var n = arr.length; var tempArr = [];

 for ( var i = 0; i < n-1; i++ ) {

    // The following line removes one random element from arr 
     // and pushes it onto tempArr 
     tempArr.push(arr.splice(Math.floor(Math.random()*arr.length),1)[0]);
 }

 // Push the remaining item onto tempArr 
 tempArr.push(arr[0]); 
 arr=tempArr; 
  • There shouldn't be a -1 for n as you used < not <= – Mohebifar May 9 '15 at 9:04
2
var shuffledArray = function(inpArr){
    //inpArr - is input array
    var arrRand = []; //this will give shuffled array
    var arrTempInd = []; // to store shuffled indexes
    var max = inpArr.length;
    var min = 0;
    var tempInd;
    var i = 0;

    do{
        //generate random index between range
        tempInd = Math.floor(Math.random() * (max - min));
        //check if index is already available in array to avoid repetition
        if(arrTempInd.indexOf(tempInd)<0){
            //push character at random index
            arrRand[i] = inpArr[tempInd];
            //push random indexes
            arrTempInd.push(tempInd);
            i++;
        }
    }
    // check if random array length is equal to input array length
    while(arrTempInd.length < max){
        return arrRand; // this will return shuffled Array
    }
};

Just pass the array to function and in return get the shuffled array

2

Considering apply it to in loco or to a new immutable array, following other solutions, here is a suggested implementation:

Array.prototype.shuffle = function(local){
  var a = this;
  var newArray = typeof local === "boolean" && local ? this : [];
  for (var i = 0, newIdx, curr, next; i < a.length; i++){
    newIdx = Math.floor(Math.random()*i);
    curr = a[i];
    next = a[newIdx];
    newArray[i] = next;
    newArray[newIdx] = curr;
  }
  return newArray;
};
2

Ronald Fisher and Frank Yates shuffle

ES2015 (ES6) release

Array.prototype.shuffle2 = function () {
    this.forEach(
        function (v, i, a) {
            let j = Math.floor(Math.random() * (i + 1));
            [a[i], a[j]] = [a[j], a[i]];
        }
    );
    return this;
}

Jet optimized ES2015 (ES6) release

Array.prototype.shuffle3 = function () {
    var m = this.length;
    while (m) {
        let i = Math.floor(Math.random() * m--);
        [this[m], this[i]] = [this[i], this[m]];
    }
    return this;
}
  • 2
    This is the same as BrunoLM's answer – Oriol Jul 24 '16 at 3:42
  • May be, but I don't thik so: 1) in my examples there are 2 - releases, one - for full understending, second - ready to use optimized version wich 2) not use low level ninja's tricks, 3) works in ANY environment with ES6. Please, don't mess the novices And, hmmm.. BrunoLM updated the answer, and now his anser is more powerful: in BrunoLM's code is not used Math but direct low level digital operations, so it's MUCH-MUCH faster. Now (after update) it's works correctly in ANY ES6 envs and strongly recomended, especially for big arrays. Thank u, Oriol. – SynCap Aug 2 '16 at 17:17
2

I see no one has yet given a solution that can be concatenated while not extending the Array prototype (which is a bad practice). Using the slightly lesser known reduce() we can easily do shuffling in a way that allows for concatenation:

var randomsquares = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7].reduce(shuffle).map(n => n*n);

You'd probably want to pass the second parameter [], as otherwise if you try to do this on an empty array it'd fail:

// Both work. The second one wouldn't have worked as the one above
var randomsquares = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7].reduce(shuffle, []).map(n => n*n);
var randomsquares = [].reduce(shuffle, []).map(n => n*n);

Let's define shuffle as:

var shuffle = (rand, one, i, orig) => {
  if (i !== 1) return rand;  // Randomize it only once (arr.length > 1)

  // You could use here other random algorithm if you wanted
  for (let i = orig.length; i; i--) {
    let j = Math.floor(Math.random() * i);
    [orig[i - 1], orig[j]] = [orig[j], orig[i - 1]];
  }

  return orig;
}

You can see it in action in JSFiddle or here:

var shuffle = (all, one, i, orig) => {
    if (i !== 1) return all;

    // You could use here other random algorithm here
    for (let i = orig.length; i; i--) {
        let j = Math.floor(Math.random() * i);
        [orig[i - 1], orig[j]] = [orig[j], orig[i - 1]];
    }

    return orig;
}

for (var i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
  var randomarray = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7].reduce(shuffle, []);
  console.log(JSON.stringify(randomarray));
}

  • It seems that you're exchanging for too much times. With reduce you can totally perform a streaming "inside-out" Fisher-Yates that uses (acc, el) => { acc.push(el); let i = Math.floor(Math.random() * (acc.length)); [acc[i], acc[acc.length - 1]] = [acc[acc.length - 1], acc[i]]; return acc; } as the callback. (Adapted from public domain code on zhihu.) – Arthur2e5 Dec 14 '16 at 4:39
2

I was thinking about oneliner to paste in console. All tricks with .sort was giving wrong results, here is my implementation:

 ['Bob', 'Amy', 'Joy'].map((person) => `${Math.random().toFixed(10)}${person}`).sort().map((person) => person.substr(12));

But don't use it in production code, it's not optimal and works with strings only.

  • It works with any kind of variable: array.map(e => [Math.random(), e]).sort((a, b) => a[0] - b[0]).map(e => e[1]) (but is not optimal). – Gustavo Rodrigues Aug 15 '17 at 19:43
  • That is a very cute solution. – superluminary Dec 11 '17 at 11:12
2

function shuffleArray(array) {
        // Create a new array with the length of the given array in the parameters
        const newArray = array.map(() => null);

        // Create a new array where each index contain the index value
        const arrayReference = array.map((item, index) => index);

        // Iterate on the array given in the parameters
        array.forEach(randomize);
        
        return newArray;

        function randomize(item) {
            const randomIndex = getRandomIndex();

            // Replace the value in the new array
            newArray[arrayReference[randomIndex]] = item;
            
            // Remove in the array reference the index used
            arrayReference.splice(randomIndex,1);
        }

        // Return a number between 0 and current array reference length
        function getRandomIndex() {
            const min = 0;
            const max = arrayReference.length;
            return Math.floor(Math.random() * (max - min)) + min;
        }
    }
    
console.log(shuffleArray([10,20,30,40,50,60,70,80,90,100]));

2
// Create a places array which holds the index for each item in the
// passed in array.
// 
// Then return a new array by randomly selecting items from the
// passed in array by referencing the places array item. Removing that
// places item each time though.
function shuffle(array) {
    let places = array.map((item, index) => index);
    return array.map((item, index, array) => {
      const random_index = Math.floor(Math.random() * places.length);
      const places_value = places[random_index];
      places.splice(random_index, 1);
      return array[places_value];
    })
}
2

By using shuffle-array module you can shuffle your array . Here is a simple code of it .

var shuffle = require('shuffle-array'),
 //collection = [1,2,3,4,5];
collection = ["a","b","c","d","e"];
shuffle(collection);

console.log(collection);

Hope this helps.

1

This variation of Fisher-Yates is slightly more efficient because it avoids swapping an element with itself:

function shuffle(array) {
  var elementsRemaining = array.length, temp, randomIndex;
  while (elementsRemaining > 1) {
    randomIndex = Math.floor(Math.random() * elementsRemaining--);
    if (randomIndex != elementsRemaining) {
      temp = array[elementsRemaining];
      array[elementsRemaining] = array[randomIndex];
      array[randomIndex] = temp;
    }
  }
  return array;
}
1

I have written a shuffle function on my own . The difference here is it will never repeat a value (checks in the code for this) :-

function shuffleArray(array) {
 var newArray = [];
 for (var i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
     newArray.push(-1);
 }

 for (var j = 0; j < array.length; j++) {
    var id = Math.floor((Math.random() * array.length));
    while (newArray[id] !== -1) {
        id = Math.floor((Math.random() * array.length));
    }

    newArray.splice(id, 1, array[j]);
 }
 return newArray; }
1

d3.js provides a built-in version of the Fisher–Yates shuffle:

console.log(d3.shuffle(["a", "b", "c", "d"]));
<script src="http://d3js.org/d3.v5.min.js"></script>

d3.shuffle(array[, lo[, hi]]) <>

Randomizes the order of the specified array using the Fisher–Yates shuffle.

1

For those of us who are not very gifted but have access to the wonders of lodash, there is such a thing as lodash.shuffle.

1

Randomly either push or unshift(add in the beginning).

['a', 'b', 'c', 'd'].reduce((acc, el) => {
  Math.random() > 0.5 ? acc.push(el) : acc.unshift(el);
  return acc;
}, []);
1

Rebuilding the entire array, one by one putting each element at a random place.

[1,2,3].reduce((a,x,i)=>{a.splice(Math.floor(Math.random()*(i+1)),0,x);return a},[])

var ia= [1,2,3];
var it= 1000;
var f = (a,x,i)=>{a.splice(Math.floor(Math.random()*(i+1)),0,x);return a};
var a = new Array(it).fill(ia).map(x=>x.reduce(f,[]));
var r = new Array(ia.length).fill(0).map((x,i)=>a.reduce((i2,x2)=>x2[i]+i2,0)/it)

console.log("These values should be quite equal:",r);

  • 3
    You should explain what your code is doing, some people may not understand 1 liners of this complexity. – RickS May 9 at 18:57
  • also note that due to the use of Math.round(... * i) this is biased, you want to be doing Math.floor(.. * (i+1)) instead – Sam Mason May 10 at 8:27
  • @SamMason Probablity of getting .5 is 1:1000000000000000000 – Alex Szücs May 10 at 19:15
  • if you use round, the probability of selecting first and last index (i.e. 0 and n) are 0.5/n, the probability of selecting any other element is 1/n (where n = a.length). this is pretty bad for short arrays – Sam Mason May 10 at 19:27
  • @SamMason thank you for pointing the error, I have updated the answer and made a tester too – Alex Szücs May 10 at 20:08
0

$=(m)=>console.log(m);

//----add this method to Array class 
Array.prototype.shuffle=function(){
  return this.sort(()=>.5 - Math.random());
};

$([1,65,87,45,101,33,9].shuffle());
$([1,65,87,45,101,33,9].shuffle());
$([1,65,87,45,101,33,9].shuffle());
$([1,65,87,45,101,33,9].shuffle());
$([1,65,87,45,101,33,9].shuffle());

  • 2
    This is very bad as the elements have a high probability of staying near their original position or barely moving from there. – Jacque Goupil Jul 26 '16 at 5:03
  • 2
    If it bad , chain it twice or more : array.shuffle().shuffle().shuffle() – Abdennour TOUMI Jul 26 '16 at 6:23
  • 5
    Repeating the call slightly reduces the probabilities of getting very similar results, but it doesn't make it a true random shuffle. In the worst case scenario, even an infinite number of calls to shuffle could still give the exact same array we started with. The Fisher-Yates algorithm is a much better and still efficient choice. – Jacque Goupil Jul 27 '16 at 4:03
  • 4
    Not the same awful answer again, please. – Oriol Aug 2 '16 at 17:39
0

A functional solution using Ramda.

const {map, compose, sortBy, prop} = require('ramda')

const shuffle = compose(
  map(prop('v')),
  sortBy(prop('i')),
  map(v => ({v, i: Math.random()}))
)

shuffle([1,2,3,4,5,6,7])
0

Shuffle array of strings:

shuffle = (array) => {
  let counter = array.length, temp, index;
  while ( counter > 0 ) {
    index = Math.floor( Math.random() * counter );
    counter--;
    temp = array[ counter ];
    array[ counter ] = array[ index ];
    array[ index ] = temp;
  }
  return array;
 }
0
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0].sort((x, z) => {
    ren = Math.random();
    if (ren == 0.5) return 0;
    return ren > 0.5 ? 1 : -1
})

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