I'm trying to implement a 1-dimensional convolution in "valid" mode (Matlab definition) in C++.

It seems pretty simple, but I haven't been able to find a code doing that in C++ (or any other language that I could adapt to as a matter of fact). If my vector size is a power, I can use a 2D convolution, but I would like to find something that would work for any input and kernel.

So how to perform a 1-dimensional convolution in "valid" mode, given an input vector of size I and a kernel of size K (the output should normally be a vector of size I - K + 1).

Pseudocode is also accepted.

closed as too broad by Soren, 4pie0, lpapp, timgeb, Ivan Ferić Jul 2 '14 at 6:53

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up vote 8 down vote accepted

You could use the one of the following implementations:

Full convolution:

template<typename T>
std::vector<T>
conv(std::vector<T> const &f, std::vector<T> const &g) {
  int const nf = f.size();
  int const ng = g.size();
  int const n  = nf + ng - 1;
  std::vector<T> out(n, T());
  for(auto i(0); i < n; ++i) {
    int const jmn = (i >= ng - 1)? i - (ng - 1) : 0;
    int const jmx = (i <  nf - 1)? i            : nf - 1;
    for(auto j(jmn); j <= jmx; ++j) {
      out[i] += (f[j] * g[i - j]);
    }
  }
  return out; 
}

f : First sequence (1D signal).

g : Second sequence (1D signal).

returns a std::vector of size f.size() + g.size() - 1, which is the result of the discrete convolution aka. Cauchy product (f * g) = (g * f).

LIVE DEMO

Valid convolution:

template<typename T>
std::vector<T>
conv_valid(std::vector<T> const &f, std::vector<T> const &g) {
  int const nf = f.size();
  int const ng = g.size();
  std::vector<T> const &min_v = (nf < ng)? f : g;
  std::vector<T> const &max_v = (nf < ng)? g : f;
  int const n  = std::max(nf, ng) - std::min(nf, ng) + 1;
  std::vector<T> out(n, T());
  for(auto i(0); i < n; ++i) {
    for(int j(min_v.size() - 1), k(i); j >= 0; --j) {
      out[i] += min_v[j] * max_v[k];
      ++k;
    }
  }
  return out;
}

f : First sequence (1D signal).

g : Second sequence (1D signal).

returns a std::vector of size std::max(f.size(), g.size()) - std::min(f.size(), g.size()) + 1, which is the result of the valid (i.e., with out the paddings) discrete convolution aka. Cauchy product (f * g) = (g * f).

LIVE DEMO

  • convolution is not only limited to vector multiplication, f & g might be a functions – 4pie0 Jul 1 '14 at 22:06
  • 1
    @bits_international I believe that the OP refers to discrete convolution (i.e., Cauchy product). – 101010 Jul 1 '14 at 22:12
  • It works, but it is not a "valid" convolution, but a "full" convolution. – Baptiste Wicht Jul 2 '14 at 6:31
  • @BaptisteWicht please check update, haven't test it though ;) – 101010 Jul 2 '14 at 10:12
  • I tested it and it indeed works (I have compared with the results on numpy). – Baptiste Wicht Jul 2 '14 at 11:27

I don't understand why you need to implement a convolution function. Doesn't Matlab have a built-in 1D convolution function?

Putting that aside, you can implement convolution given a Fourier transform function. You need to be careful about the length of the input and output vectors. The length of the result is I + K - 1 (not I - K + 1, right?). Extend each input vector with zeros to length N where N is the power of 2 greater than or equal to I + K - 1. Take the Fourier transform of the inputs, then multiple the results element by element. Take the inverse Fourier transform of that product, and return the first I + K - 1 elements (throw the rest away). That's your convolution.

You may need to throw in a scaling factor of 1/N somewhere since there is no universally-agreed scaling for Fourier transforms, and I don't remember what Matlab assumes for that.

  • The OP's asking about the C++, not Matlab version. Also, why have you mentioned Fourier transform? Convolution is much more than that. – KjMag Jul 1 '14 at 21:30
  • It is conventional to use FT to efficiently implement convolution, via the identity FT(conv(x, y)) = FT(x) * FT(y) where the multiplication is taken element by element. – Robert Dodier Jul 1 '14 at 21:42
  • OK, but the result vector in case of valid convolution is smaller than input, so it won't have I + K - 1 elements, but I - K instead, because we skip points on the edges, and each edge in 1-D case is of K/2 length (provided that the total length of the kernel vector is K + 1). – KjMag Jul 1 '14 at 21:48

In order to perform a 1-D valid convolution on an std::vector (let's call it vec for the sake of the example, and the output vector would be outvec) of the size l it is enough to create the right boundaries by setting loop parameters correctly, and then perform the convolution as usual, i.e.:

for(size_t i = K/2; i < l - K/2; ++i)
{
    outvec[i] = 0.0;
    for(size_t j = 0; j < K+1; j++)
    {
         outvec[i - K/2] += invec[i - K/2 + j] * kernel[j];
    }
} 

Note the starting and the final value of i.

Works for any 1-D kernel of any size - provided that the kernel is not of bigger size than vector ;)

Note that I've used the variable K as you've described it, but personally I would've understand the 'size' different - a matter of taste I guess. In this example, the total length of the kernel vector is K+1. I've also assumed that the outvec already has l - K elements (BTW: output vector has l - K elements, not l - K + 1 as you have written), so no push_back() is needed.

  • According to Numpy and Matlab, the result of a "valid" convolution is I -K + 1. Otherwise convolve([1,1,1],[2,2,2]) wouldn't work, but it does (at least in numpy) – Baptiste Wicht Jul 2 '14 at 6:44
  • It would work. In this case: l = 3, K = 2, and the length of the result vector would be l - K = 1, which is correct. Maybe the difference is that you defined K differently than I in the example above. – KjMag Jul 2 '14 at 7:44
  • There may have been a misunderstanding for the K. For me in convolve([1,1,1],[2,2,2]) I = 3 and K = 3 and in which case I - K = 0 – Baptiste Wicht Jul 2 '14 at 8:40
  • That's what I thought. Anyway, apart from the K being defined differently, it should work as expected ;) BTW you don't even have to change the code given above if you define K that way; just declare K as int in your code since in case of int/int division the division remainder will be discarded. – KjMag Jul 2 '14 at 8:49

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