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To better explain what Im trying to do Im going to preface a bit with no code and then show you the code I am working with in the pertinent pieces.

I currently and working with a function that measures the width and height of a canvas element and divides half of each size by an inputted number. I then decide if the resulting number is even by using math.ceil() and %2===0. Using this formula I will decide if the width is boolean true or false and the same for the height.

In the end I will have

var A = True (or False)

var B = True (or False)

I then have the creation of a 3 dimensional array:

var pax = [];

for (var i = 0; i < stage.height()/12; i++){
    pax[i] = [];
    for (var j = 0; j < stage.width()/12; j++){
        pax[i][j] = [];
        pax[i][j].push("if statement here");
    };
}

I need an elegant way to replace "if statement here" with something like a double if statement where

if (A === B) { 
    (((i%2)===0)===((j%2)===0)) ? 0 : 180) 
    || 
    (((i%2)===0)!==((j%2)===0)) ? 180 : 0) 
} else { 
    (((i%2)===0)===((j%2)===0)) ? 180 : 0) 
    || 
    (((i%2)===0)!==((j%2)===0)) ? 0 : 180) 
};

Im pretty sure this monstrosity that I just typed wont work, so I need both the correct way to type the syntax and a more elegant and resource light way to do it, just due to the amount of index locations I will be pushing to in the array.

Basically what Im trying to do is say "Based on the height and width of the canvas, if i is even, return 0, and if i is odd, return 180, OR based on the height and width of the canvas, if i is even, return 180, and if i is odd, return 0.

I can attempt to explain this again if this is unclear.

  • 1
    for starters, dont write everything in one line. I dont know why people think its cool or something. It makes reading the code much harder and wont be any faster by saving linefeeds. – Zig Mandel Jul 2 '14 at 2:52
  • "Based on the height and width of the canvas, if i is even, return 0, and if i is odd, return 180, OR based on the height and width of the canvas, if i is even, return 180, and if i is odd, return 0." I think those 2 have the same condition, what differentiate them ? – Bla... Jul 2 '14 at 2:54
  • @ZigMandel Edited the if statement to make it more readable for you. – JSArrakis Jul 2 '14 at 3:05
  • Isn't the result of (((i%2)===0)===((j%2)===0)) identical to i%2 == j%2? – RobG Jul 2 '14 at 3:05
  • This logic is far too complex to be expressed comprehensibly on one line, and JavaScript's syntax is particularly poorly suited for doing so. I could write this in a fairly elegant manner, but that is mutually exclusive with writing it as a one-line expression. – Chuck Jul 2 '14 at 3:06
4

You want your modulus operations to match or not match. With x % 2, there can only be one of two results, so there's no point in converting to a boolean with ===. And the parens are just excessive. All that clutter doesn't help. So here's a first pass:

if (A === B) { 
    (i%2===j%2 ? 0 : 180) || (i%2!==j%2 ? 180 : 0) 
} else { 
    (i%2===j%2 ? 180 : 0) || (i%2!==j%2 ? 0 : 180) 
}

Then it seems that you want the numbers flipped based on comparison to A === B. So if they are equal and even you want 0, 180 or if they are unequal and odd, you want 180, 0. So basically if the i/j comparison and the A/B comparison are the same, you have one result, otherwise, the other.

The odd thing is that when one % test succeeds but yields 0 the || operation makes it attempt the opposite % test, which of course will fail. But because the numbers are reversed for the second test, we end up with the correct value. It's just that you're going about it in a roundabout way.


Ultimately, what your code does is simply this:

(A === B) === (i%2===j%2) ? 0 : 180

Here's a demo that shows that your original and short version achieve the same result.

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/jDWf6/3/

(EDIT: Updated demo to show all values tested.)

  • Exactly what I was looking for, something concise and small and resource light. – JSArrakis Jul 2 '14 at 3:54
  • Glad it worked for you. – cookie monster Jul 2 '14 at 3:57
  • Actually looking at it more shouldnt it be (A === B) && (i%2===j%2) ? 0 : 180 ? – JSArrakis Jul 2 '14 at 12:58
  • Nevermind I had to draw it out. Youre right. I wasnt taking into account if it was all 'odd' then an index of 0 in the array would still return a 0 – JSArrakis Jul 2 '14 at 13:36
  • @JSArrakis: Yeah, at first glance it looks like that would work, but as you pointed out, there's the one case that it misses. It would work with an XOR operator and reversing the values. JS does not have a logical XOR, but they have a bitwise one that will work in this situation. A === B ^ i%2===j%2 ? 180 : 0 Now if both or neither are true, the condition fails, and you get 0. A silly and novel approach would be to take the 1 or 0 returned by the XOR, and use multiplication (A === B ^ i%2===j%2) * 180. These are probably all slower than the one in my answer. Fun to experiment though. – cookie monster Jul 2 '14 at 14:55
1

The condition:

if (A === B) { 
    (((i%2)===0)===((j%2)===0)) ? 0 : 180) 
    || 
    (((i%2)===0)!==((j%2)===0)) ? 180 : 0) 
} else { 
    (((i%2)===0)===((j%2)===0)) ? 180 : 0) 
    || 
    (((i%2)===0)!==((j%2)===0)) ? 0 : 180) 
};

(There's no need for a semi–colon after a block statement)

is overly complex and can be reduced to (assuming it should return something):

var result;

if (A === B) { 
  result = i%2 == j%2? 0 : 180 || i%2 != j%2? 180 : 0; 
} else { 
  result = i%2 == j%2? 180 : 0 || i%2 != j%2? 0 : 180;
}

In the first assignment, the two || operands return the same value for any given values of i and j, so it might as well be:

  result = i%2 == j%2? 0 : 180;

since if i%2 == j%2 returns true, then:

i%2 == j%2? 0 : 180

returns 0, which converts to false, so the second expression is evaluated:

i%2 != j%2? 180 : 0

and i%2 != j%2 must return false (since the opposite was true) and again 0 is returned. The exact opposite occurs if the original expression returned false:

i%2 == j%2? 0 : 180

returns 180, which is truthy, so the otehr side of the || is not evaluated.

So now you have:

if (A === B) { 
  result = i%2 == j%2? 0 : 180; 
} else { 
  result = i%2 == j%2? 180 : 0;
}

That means that the result of:

i%2 == j%2? 0 : 180

is reversed based on A === B, so:

result = A === B? (i%2 == j%2? 0 : 180) : (i%2 == j%2? 180 : 0)

Of course this could be way off if your pseudo code isn't doing what you hoped…

  • Any JavaScript program can be reduced to a one-liner — but it's best to leave that to your minifier. – Chuck Jul 2 '14 at 3:25
  • @Chuck—certainly, however the OP seemed to want to reduce for simplicity, so reduce to absurdity then backup until to sanity. :-) Anyway, cookie monster has gone one better. – RobG Jul 2 '14 at 3:55
  • @RobG Im not entirely sure if I will use yours or cookie monster's in the end, as yours might be a little bit more readable for anyone else looking at the code. – JSArrakis Jul 2 '14 at 3:58
  • Cookie monster's is shorter and just as readable, so probably easier to understand. – RobG Jul 2 '14 at 4:37
1

ok my friend based on what you asking here is the answer.

*I don't know if this will be what you will looking for because your logic is a bit complicated and not so correct....

As you can see i reduced the code and i maximized the performance. Also i make clear what "i" is and what "j". Just to be more readable...

var pax = [];
var isHeightEven, isWidthEven;

for (var height = 0; height < stage.height() / 12; height++) {
    pax[height] = [];
    for (var width = 0; width < stage.width() / 12; width++){
        pax[height][width] = [];
        isHeightEven = !(height % 2); //calculate only once
        isWidthEven = !(width % 2); //calculate only once

        pax[height][width].push(
            (A === B) ? ((isHeightEven && isWidthEven) ? 0 : 180) : ((isHeightEven && isWidthEven) ? 180 : 0)
            );
    };
}
  • 1
    (height % 2) == 0 ? true : false can be !(height % 2). :-) – RobG Jul 2 '14 at 3:57

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