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I am trying to build a clock which will show server time without instant server requests. The purpose is - I need a clock which shows every user the same time and will not make much server requests).

I wanted to pass actual server time to JavaScript and than just count seconds, but I realised after few minutes that there are huge differencies on random browser. How could it be fixed? What is the cause of this difference? If i checked execution time for my function, it was always shown 1-4 ms, but it looks like, the clock is missing more than 60ms every second on one browser and in the other only 10ms.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-latest.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script>
function startTime(sTime) {
    sTime = typeof sTime !== 'undefined' ? sTime : 0;
    nowDateInput = $('#todaydate').html(); // 2014, 07, 02, 08, 14, 35
    nn = nowDateInput.split(',');
    if (nn[1] == 0) {
        nn[1] = 12;
    } else {
        nn[1] = nn[1] - 1;
    }
    today = new Date(nn[0], nn[1], nn[2], nn[3], nn[4], nn[5]);
    today.setSeconds(today.getSeconds()+sTime);
    var h=today.getHours();
    var m=today.getMinutes();
    var s=today.getSeconds();
    m = checkTime(m);
    s = checkTime(s);
    document.getElementById('clock').innerHTML = h+":"+m+":"+s;
    var t = setTimeout(function(){startTime(sTime)},1000);
    sTime = sTime + 1;
}
function checkTime(i) {
    if (i<10) {i = "0" + i};
    return i;
}

</script>
</head>
<body onload="startTime()">
    <div id="todaydate" style="display:none;">2014, 07, 02, 08, 14, 35</div><!-- This field is normally passed from Django-View to Template  -->
    <div id="clock"></div>
</body>
</html>

I am thinking about running simultaneously JavaScript clock and measure the difference between now() and state from page-open. Will that be a good solution?

========================================================

EDIT:

Taking the difference between ServerTime and current JS-Time is a good solution. Here's my current solution which gives always the accuracy lt 1s.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-latest.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script>
function startTime(initJSTime) {

    // page-load JS-time
    if (typeof initJSTime === 'undefined') {
        initJSTime = new Date(); 
    }
    // Current JS-Time
    var todayJS = new Date(); 

    // Converting Server-Time when page is loaded to JS-Date 
    nowDateInput = $('.todaydate').html(); 
    nn = nowDateInput.split(',');
    if (nn[1] == 0) {
        nn[1] = 12;
    } else {
        nn[1] = nn[1] - 1;
    }
    var today = new Date(nn[0], nn[1], nn[2], nn[3], nn[4], nn[5]);

    // Difference between Current JS-time and page-load JS-time
    var initDiffmSec = todayJS - initJSTime;

    // Setting Clock-Time as sum of Server-Time and Difference
    today.setMilliseconds(today.getMilliseconds()+initDiffmSec);

    // Output-presentation of the clock
    var h=today.getHours();
    var m=today.getMinutes();
    var s=today.getSeconds();
    m = checkTime(m);
    s = checkTime(s);
    document.getElementById('clock').innerHTML = h+":"+m+":"+s;

    // next function call 
    var t = setTimeout(function(){startTime(initJSTime)},1000);
}

function checkTime(i) {
    if (i<10) {i = "0" + i};  // add zero in front of numbers < 10
    return i;
}

</script>
</head>
<body onload="startTime()">
    <div id="todaydate" style="display:none;">2014, 07, 02, 08, 14, 35</div><!-- This field is normally passed from Django-View to Template  -->
    <div id="clock"></div>
</body>
</html>
  • 1
    One problem is that you are relying on setInterval to run exactly once per second. It doesn't, it runs at best at slightly longer than one second intervals. You need to set the time based on the current client clock and delta with server clock. – RobG Jul 2 '14 at 6:44
  • Just find the starting difference of time with the server and then "any time" get the browser time and add the difference. Only one server request. :) – Ashish Negi Jul 2 '14 at 6:51
2

You can do an in–page version that is based on a time value sent from the server. Hopefully the comments are sufficient.

<script>

// Unix time value from server: seconds since 1970-01-01T00:00:00Z
// Below is a number for 2014-07-02T06:48:24.000Z, set to actual server value
var serverTime = 1404283704;

var doClock = (function () {

  // Calc offset from server time
  // Javascript time value is milliseconds since above epoch
  var serverOffset = serverTime - (new Date() / 1000 | 0);

  // Helper
  function z(n){return (n<10?'0':'') + n}

  return function() {

    // Create a new Date object each time so
    // it doesn't matter if a second or more is skipped
    var now = new Date();

    // Adjust for server offset
    now.setSeconds(now.getSeconds() + serverOffset);

    // write clock to document, values are local, not UTC
    document.getElementById('clock').innerHTML = now.getFullYear()   + '-' +
                                                 z(now.getMonth()+1) + '-' +
                                                 z(now.getDate())    + ' ' +
                                                 z(now.getHours())   + ':' +
                                                 z(now.getMinutes()) + ':' +
                                                 z(now.getSeconds());
    // Run again just after next full second
    setTimeout(doClock, 1020 - now.getMilliseconds());
  };    
}());

window.onload = doClock;

</script>

<div id="clock"></div>

The initiation of the sever lag occurs as soon as the script is loaded, so put as close to the top of the page as you can to minimise the lag.

  • Thanks @RobG, taking the difference between ServerTime and current JS-Time is a good solution. Here's my current solution which gives always the accuracy <1s. – robkmi Jul 2 '14 at 12:52
  • Be careful that these times (server and in-browser) will drift, but it's impossible to say how fast and in which direction relative to each other. – Jmills Jul 2 '14 at 13:18
  • @TheCardCheat—yes, it might be good to do a server update from time to time, say every 10 minutes or so. The user might also adjust their system clock. – RobG Jul 2 '14 at 23:13
1

Possible reasons for difference in times:

  1. Network latency that varies with distance and quality of connection.
  2. Rendering page in different browser takes different time.

Solution:

Use NTP to synchronize the timings. Check this link.

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