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I've got a log4J setup in which the root logger is supposed to log ERROR level messages and above to the console and another logger logs everything to syslog.

log4j.properties is:

# Root logger option
log4j.rootLogger=ERROR,R

log4j.appender.R=org.apache.log4j.ConsoleAppender
log4j.appender.R.layout=org.apache.log4j.PatternLayout
log4j.appender.R.layout.ConversionPattern=%d %p %t %c - %m%n

log4j.logger.SGSearch=DEBUG,SGSearch
log4j.appender.SGSearch=org.apache.log4j.net.SyslogAppender
log4j.appender.SGSearch.SyslogHost=localhost
log4j.appender.SGSearch.Facility=LOCAL6
log4j.appender.SGSearch.layout=org.apache.log4j.PatternLayout
log4j.appender.SGSearch.layout.ConversionPattern=[%-5p] %m%n

In code I do

private static final Logger logger = Logger.getLogger("SGSearch");
.
.
.
logger.info("Commencing snapshot index [" + args[1] + " -> " + args[2] + "]");

What is happening is that I get the console logging for all logging levels. What seems to be happening is that the level for SGSearch overrides the level set for the root logger somehow. I can't figure it out.

I have confirmed that Log4J is reading the properties file I think it is, and no other (via the -Dlog4j.debug option)

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3 Answers 3

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The way Log4j chaining works is a bit counter intuitive (to me at least). See the log4j manual. If the request level is equal to or above the threshold of the most specific matching logger, it is accepted. Once the request is accepted, it gets handled by the complete chain of ancestors regardless of their thresholds!

To suppress the chaining behavior, add:

log4j.additivity.SGSearch=false

This will cause requests handled by logger SGSearch to no longer be passed up the chain.

One other suggestion: don't name your logger and appender the same, because at some point in the future you, or a colleague will mix them up. The logger name should indicate which type of logging is handled, the appender name should specify where the logging goes. So in this case I would think 'SGSearch' could be the logger name, and the appender should be called something like 'LocalSysLog'.

BTW: In my opinion you are doing the right thing by restricting the root logger with a high threshold, and lowering it for specific loggers. This avoids clutter from loud libraries (Apache has a few notorious ones).

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    It surprises me that Log4j does not apply the log event threshold of parent loggers (where root logger is the top-most parent) independently of their child loggers. Jun 11, 2010 at 16:02
  • Thank you! Your answer was very helpful. I refer to your answer in my answer at stackoverflow.com/questions/3023690/… to my similar question at stackoverflow.com/questions/3023690/…. Jun 12, 2010 at 12:10
  • 1
    "Once the request is accepted, it gets handled by the complete chain of ancestors regardless of their thresholds!" If this is true, then isn't this a bug in Log4j? Behaviour that is so counterintuitive must be an error. Jun 13, 2010 at 12:44
  • 1
    I think it has to do with minimalization of the amount of work that needs to be done per log event. But as I said at the start of my response, it IS a bit counter intuitive at first. Jun 14, 2010 at 9:43
  • I now better understand how loggers inherit appenders and though this behaviour did seem strange to me at first, I agree that it is not a bug, but is actually a useful way to reduce the number of appenders one need associate with a chain of loggers. Jul 11, 2010 at 12:40
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Quick information about Levels

Log4J Levels

Loggers may be assigned levels. The set of possible levels, that is DEBUG, INFO, WARN, ERROR and FATAL are defined in the org.apache.log4j.Level class.

If a given logger is not assigned a level, then it inherits one from its closest ancestor with an assigned level.

The root logger resides at the top of the logger hierarchy. It always exists and always has an assigned level.

I've changed your sample log4j configuration to work this way:

# Root logger option
log4j.rootLogger=ALL,R

log4j.appender.R=org.apache.log4j.ConsoleAppender
log4j.appender.R.Target=System.out
log4j.appender.R.layout=org.apache.log4j.PatternLayout
log4j.appender.R.layout.ConversionPattern=%d %p %t %c - %m%n
log4j.appender.R.Threshold=ERROR

log4j.appender.SGSearch=org.apache.log4j.net.SyslogAppender
log4j.appender.SGSearch.SyslogHost=localhost
log4j.appender.SGSearch.Facility=LOCAL6
log4j.appender.SGSearch.layout=org.apache.log4j.PatternLayout
log4j.appender.SGSearch.layout.ConversionPattern=[%-5p] %m%n
log4j.appender.SGSearch.Threshold=DEBUG

I hope this helps you.

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    Thanks. That worked but I found I did need to add the line "log4j.logger.SGSearch=ALL,SGSearch" as well to the example you gave.
    – AndrewR
    Mar 16, 2010 at 22:19
  • @AndrewR: Or you could have done this log4j.appender.SGSearch.Threshold=ALL but then that would make log4j.rootLogger useless (if i'm not mistaken). Mar 16, 2010 at 22:28
  • I think this solution is suboptimal. See my suggestion below. Mar 19, 2010 at 13:09
  • Well, @Adriaan Koster, the solution helped the questioner and that's what he/she wanted. Mar 19, 2010 at 14:28
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    Fair enough. I just happen to think opening up the root logger is a common mistake, due to misunderstanding of the way 'additivity' works in Log4j. Mar 20, 2010 at 0:03
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setting the threshold on a per-appender basis is key here:

log4j.appender.SGSearch.Threshold=DEBUG

and

log4j.appender.R.Threshold=ERROR

this is a far better solution than the suggestion to disable "additivity" - the problem with that is that anything you want multiple appenders to handle will be defeated by it - so you cannot, for example, send anything which is an ERROR level message to both the console and syslog if you set additivity to false...

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