145

How do I format a Double to a String in C# so as to have only two decimal places?

If I use String.Format("{0:0.00}%", myDoubleValue) the number is then rounded and I want a simple truncate without any rounding. I also want the conversion to String to be culture sensitive.

  • What do you mean by "culture sensitive"? Does that mean that the outcome of the formatting must vary depending on a programmer-provided culture value? Or do you want to use whatever culture is the default for the current thread? – CesarGon Mar 16 '10 at 13:36

15 Answers 15

193

I use the following:

double x = Math.Truncate(myDoubleValue * 100) / 100;

For instance:

If the number is 50.947563 and you use the following, the following will happen:

- Math.Truncate(50.947563 * 100) / 100;
- Math.Truncate(5094.7563) / 100;
- 5094 / 100
- 50.94

And there's your answer truncated, now to format the string simply do the following:

string s = string.Format("{0:N2}%", x); // No fear of rounding and takes the default number format
  • 2
    -1 You can do the culture-sensitive formatting in the same string.Format step that formats the string. See my answer below. – CesarGon Mar 16 '10 at 11:53
  • 3
    Alright no problem, I will simply post an addendum. – Kyle Rozendo Mar 16 '10 at 12:03
  • 1
    That's great. I hope my comment doesn't look that silly now. :-) I'll change my downvote then. – CesarGon Mar 16 '10 at 12:06
  • 1
    To me it did, as the solution on the string formatting is incredibly simple, the truncation was more tricky. – Kyle Rozendo Mar 16 '10 at 12:15
  • 2
    @Jonny that won't work because it rounds - OP wants it to truncate (and not round). The difference is subtle. – BKSpurgeon May 5 at 17:37
95

The following rounds the numbers, but only shows up to 2 decimal places (removing any trailing zeros), thanks to .##.

decimal d0 = 24.154m;
decimal d1 = 24.155m;
decimal d2 = 24.1m;
decimal d3 = 24.0m;

d0.ToString("0.##");   //24.15
d1.ToString("0.##");   //24.16 (rounded up)
d2.ToString("0.##");   //24.1  
d3.ToString("0.##");   //24

http://dobrzanski.net/2009/05/14/c-decimaltostring-and-how-to-get-rid-of-trailing-zeros/

  • 9
    This doesn't work. Try it with 0.2415999. This solutions rounds, not truncates. – BJury May 13 '15 at 15:03
  • 4
    Wow, so many up votes and yet it's using rounding. It may be necessary to point out that rounding is heading towards the closest decimal place requested, whereas truncating is chopping off after the closest decimal place requested. – mysticcoder Aug 24 '15 at 10:10
  • 1
    @mysticcoder I guess my answer gets so many upvotes because they come to the ops question in a Google search the same way I did, looking to removing trailing zeros, and not looking for the rounding desire of the ops question. I guess I should delete my answer... – Brian Ogden May 15 '16 at 21:09
  • @BrianOgden - No, please don't delete. I arrived here looking for your answer. +1 – Roberto Oct 8 at 17:46
32

I suggest you truncate first, and then format:

double a = 123.4567;
double aTruncated = Math.Truncate(a * 100) / 100;
CultureInfo ci = new CultureInfo("de-DE");
string s = string.Format(ci, "{0:0.00}%", aTruncated);

Use the constant 100 for 2 digits truncate; use a 1 followed by as many zeros as digits after the decimal point you would like. Use the culture name you need to adjust the formatting result.

15

Simplest method, use numeric format strings:

double total = "43.257"
MessageBox.Show(total.ToString("F"));
11

i use price.ToString("0.00") for getting the leading 0s

6

The c# function, as expressed by Kyle Rozendo:

string DecimalPlaceNoRounding(double d, int decimalPlaces = 2)
{
    d = d * Math.Pow(10, decimalPlaces);
    d = Math.Truncate(d);
    d = d / Math.Pow(10, decimalPlaces);
    return string.Format("{0:N" + Math.Abs(decimalPlaces) + "}", d);
}
4

This is working for me

string prouctPrice = Convert.ToDecimal(String.Format("{0:0.00}", Convert.ToDecimal(yourString))).ToString();
4

How about adding one extra decimal that is to be rounded and then discarded:

var d = 0.241534545765;
var result1 = d.ToString("0.###%");

var result2 = result1.Remove(result1.Length - 1);
  • 2
    It's funny how a not working answer has 60 vote ups (as of today), and this pretty simple and bulletproof solution has only one.... – Arthur Kazykhanov Oct 26 '17 at 18:45
  • 3
    This will not work in the case that the rounding affects more than one digit above the cutoff. For example 0.199999 will end up as 0.20 with this code, instead of 0.19. – Bernem Mar 6 '18 at 4:08
2

I know this is a old thread but I've just had to do this. While the other approaches here work, I wanted an easy way to be able to affect a lot of calls to string.format. So adding the Math.Truncate to all the calls to wasn't really a good option. Also as some of the formatting is stored in a database, it made it even worse.

Thus, I made a custom format provider which would allow me to add truncation to the formatting string, eg:

string.format(new FormatProvider(), "{0:T}", 1.1299); // 1.12
string.format(new FormatProvider(), "{0:T(3)", 1.12399); // 1.123
string.format(new FormatProvider(), "{0:T(1)0,000.0", 1000.9999); // 1,000.9

The implementation is pretty simple and is easily extendible to other requirements.

public class FormatProvider : IFormatProvider, ICustomFormatter
{
    public object GetFormat(Type formatType)
    {
        if (formatType == typeof (ICustomFormatter))
        {
            return this;
        }
        return null;
    }

    public string Format(string format, object arg, IFormatProvider formatProvider)
    {
        if (arg == null || arg.GetType() != typeof (double))
        {
            try
            {
                return HandleOtherFormats(format, arg);
            }
            catch (FormatException e)
            {
                throw new FormatException(string.Format("The format of '{0}' is invalid.", format));
            }
        }

        if (format.StartsWith("T"))
        {
            int dp = 2;
            int idx = 1;
            if (format.Length > 1)
            {
                if (format[1] == '(')
                {
                    int closeIdx = format.IndexOf(')');
                    if (closeIdx > 0)
                    {
                        if (int.TryParse(format.Substring(2, closeIdx - 2), out dp))
                        {
                            idx = closeIdx + 1;
                        }
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        throw new FormatException(string.Format("The format of '{0}' is invalid.", format));
                    }
                }
            }
            double mult = Math.Pow(10, dp);
            arg = Math.Truncate((double)arg * mult) / mult;
            format = format.Substring(idx);
        }

        try
        {
            return HandleOtherFormats(format, arg);
        }
        catch (FormatException e)
        {
            throw new FormatException(string.Format("The format of '{0}' is invalid.", format));
        }
    }

    private string HandleOtherFormats(string format, object arg)
    {
        if (arg is IFormattable)
        {
            return ((IFormattable) arg).ToString(format, CultureInfo.CurrentCulture);
        }
        return arg != null ? arg.ToString() : String.Empty;
    }
}
1

To what is worth, for showing currency, you can use "C":

double cost = 1.99;
m_CostText.text = cost.ToString("C"); /*C: format as currentcy */

Output: $1.99

0

You could also write your own IFormatProvider, though I suppose eventually you'd have to think of a way to do the actual truncation.

The .NET Framework also supports custom formatting. This typically involves the creation of a formatting class that implements both IFormatProvider and ICustomFormatter. (msdn)

At least it would be easily reusable.

There is an article about how to implement your own IFormatProvider/ICustomFormatter here at CodeProject. In this case, "extending" an existing numeric format might be the best bet. It doesn't look too hard.

0

Following can be used for display only which uses the property of String ..

double value = 123.456789;
String.Format("{0:0.00}", value);
  • This will give "123.46". The question specifically asks for no rounding. – Tobberoth Oct 15 at 7:44
0

I had that problem with xamarin and solved with:

porcent.ToString("0.##"+"%")
0

Solution:

var d = 0.123345678; 
var stringD = d.ToString(); 
int indexOfP = stringD.IndexOf("."); 
var result = stringD.Remove((indexOfP+1)+2);

(indexOfP+1)+2(this number depend on how many number you want to preserve. I give it two because the question owner want.)

0

Also note the CultureInformation of your system. Here my solution without rounding.

In this example you just have to define the variable MyValue as double. As result you get your formatted value in the string variable NewValue.

Note - Also set the C# using statement:

using System.Globalization;  

string MyFormat = "0";
if (MyValue.ToString (CultureInfo.InvariantCulture).Contains (CultureInfo.InvariantCulture.NumberFormat.NumberDecimalSeparator))
   {
      MyFormat += ".00";
   }

string NewValue = MyValue.ToString(MyFormat);

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