I'm trying to create a dashborder (prior to java 7) only for the panel but it also apply to all components in the panel. Does anyone know why ?

public class Box extends JPanel {

        public Box() {
            super();
            DashedBorder dashedBorder = new DashedBorder();

            this.setBorder(new TitledBorder(dashedBorder, "title", TitledBorder.CENTER, TitledBorder.DEFAULT_POSITION));
            this.setLayout(new GridLayout(5, 1));
            for (int i = 1; i <= 15; i++) {
                this.add(new JCheckBox("" + i));
            }

        }


    class DashedBorder extends AbstractBorder {
        @Override
        public void paintBorder(Component comp, Graphics g, int x, int y, int w, int h) {
            Graphics2D g2d = (Graphics2D) g;
            g2d.setColor(Color.black);
            g2d.setStroke(new BasicStroke(1, BasicStroke.CAP_BUTT, BasicStroke.JOIN_BEVEL, 0, new float[] { 5 }, 0));
            g2d.drawRect(x, y, w - 1, h - 1);
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        JFrame frame = new JFrame();
        JPanel p = new JPanel();
        p.setLayout(new BorderLayout());
        Box box = new Box();
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        frame.setSize(400, 400);
        frame.setContentPane(p);
        p.add(box,BorderLayout.CENTER);
        frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
        frame.setVisible(true);
    }



}
  • 1
    +1 for a decent code sample that reproduces the issue – Duncan Jones Jul 3 '14 at 10:32
  • Thanks Duncan !! – user3748551 Jul 3 '14 at 12:06
up vote 5 down vote accepted

That happens because you didn't cleanup your graphics settings after painting border.

Basically Swing uses the same graphics which you have received into paintBorder method is used to paint whatever lies on the panel. So if you set the stroke, composite, font, color etc - make sure to return previously used settings after, otherwise you might see such unexpected behavior.

You can't predict whether or not components painted after yours will setup their own stroke/composite/whatever else, so you have to restore default graphics settings after you finish painting your own stuff.

Well, actually you can skip restoring color since almost every component uses its own while painting so its not that critical to keep the default intact. But only color, all the other settings should be restored unless your component doesn't have any childs or you are 100% sure that child components redefine some specific properties (I doubt you can be sure about it anyhow).

Here is the simple fix:

public class Box extends JPanel
{
    public Box ()
    {
        super ();

        DashedBorder dashedBorder = new DashedBorder ();
        this.setBorder ( new TitledBorder ( dashedBorder, "title", TitledBorder.CENTER, TitledBorder.DEFAULT_POSITION ) );
        this.setLayout ( new GridLayout ( 5, 1 ) );
        for ( int i = 1; i <= 15; i++ )
        {
            this.add ( new JCheckBox ( "" + i ) );
        }
    }

    class DashedBorder extends AbstractBorder
    {
        @Override
        public void paintBorder ( Component comp, Graphics g, int x, int y, int w, int h )
        {
            Graphics2D g2d = ( Graphics2D ) g;
            g2d.setColor ( Color.black );
            final Stroke os = g2d.getStroke ();
            g2d.setStroke ( new BasicStroke ( 1, BasicStroke.CAP_BUTT, BasicStroke.JOIN_BEVEL, 0, new float[]{ 5 }, 0 ) );
            g2d.drawRect ( x, y, w - 1, h - 1 );
            g2d.setStroke ( os );
        }
    }

    public static void main ( String[] args )
    {
        JFrame frame = new JFrame ();
        JPanel p = new JPanel ();
        p.setLayout ( new BorderLayout () );
        Box box = new Box ();
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation ( JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE );
        frame.setSize ( 400, 400 );
        frame.setContentPane ( p );
        p.add ( box, BorderLayout.CENTER );
        frame.setLocationRelativeTo ( null );
        frame.setVisible ( true );
    }
}

I doubt there are a lot of articles about this since since not a lot of people playing around with painting on a container-like components. You will never see this issue if your component is the last in the painting "chain" or basically doesn't have child components.

In my own projects I am using a few helper methods separated into some utility class to assist me with setup/restore actions, for example for the stroke:

public static Stroke setupStroke ( final Graphics2D g2d, final Stroke stroke )
{
    return setupStroke ( g2d, stroke, true );
}

public static Stroke setupStroke ( final Graphics2D g2d, final Stroke stroke, final boolean shouldSetup )
{
    if ( shouldSetup && stroke != null )
    {
        final Stroke old = g2d.getStroke ();
        g2d.setStroke ( stroke );
        return old;
    }
    else
    {
        return null;
    }
}

public static void restoreStroke ( final Graphics2D g2d, final Stroke stroke )
{
    restoreStroke ( g2d, stroke, true );
}

public static void restoreStroke ( final Graphics2D g2d, final Stroke stroke, final boolean shouldRestore )
{
    if ( shouldRestore && stroke != null )
    {
        g2d.setStroke ( stroke );
    }
}

So you end up using only two lines of code while painting:

final Stroke stroke = GraphicsUtils.setupStroke ( newStroke );

// paint something

GraphicsUtils.restoreStroke ( g2d, stroke );
  • +1 Good spot. Odd how this problem doesn't trigger in Java 8 - did they fix something that you know of? – Duncan Jones Jul 3 '14 at 10:10
  • Whether or not this issue will be visible depends on when and how the underlying components are painted. For example if they are painted right after yours - you will see the issue, if not (for example their repaint forced by some event) - you won't see the issue. So probably in JDK8 the initial painting is performed in a bit different way so you don't see the issue right away, but that doesn't mean its not there or fixed. – Mikle Garin Jul 3 '14 at 10:15
  • there is an issue with double buffering (feature or bug in Java8) – mKorbel Jul 3 '14 at 10:37
  • Thank you so much.Very good useful explanations – user3748551 Jul 3 '14 at 12:07

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