143

In a dataset with multiple observations for each subject. For each subject I want to select the row which have the maximum value of 'pt'. For example, with a following dataset:

ID    <- c(1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3)
Value <- c(2,3,5,2,5,8,17,3,5)
Event <- c(1,1,2,1,2,1,2,2,2)

group <- data.frame(Subject=ID, pt=Value, Event=Event)
#   Subject pt Event
# 1       1  2     1
# 2       1  3     1
# 3       1  5     2 # max 'pt' for Subject 1
# 4       2  2     1
# 5       2  5     2
# 6       2  8     1
# 7       2 17     2 # max 'pt' for Subject 2
# 8       3  3     2
# 9       3  5     2 # max 'pt' for Subject 3

Subject 1, 2, and 3 have the biggest pt value of 5, 17, and 5 respectively.

How could I first find the biggest pt value for each subject, and then, put this observation in another data frame? The resulting data frame should only have the biggest pt values for each subject.

2

17 Answers 17

134

Here's a data.table solution:

require(data.table) ## 1.9.2
group <- as.data.table(group)

If you want to keep all the entries corresponding to max values of pt within each group:

group[group[, .I[pt == max(pt)], by=Subject]$V1]
#    Subject pt Event
# 1:       1  5     2
# 2:       2 17     2
# 3:       3  5     2

If you'd like just the first max value of pt:

group[group[, .I[which.max(pt)], by=Subject]$V1]
#    Subject pt Event
# 1:       1  5     2
# 2:       2 17     2
# 3:       3  5     2

In this case, it doesn't make a difference, as there aren't multiple maximum values within any group in your data.

9
  • 3
    seeing as data.table has had a LOT of changes since 2014, is this still the fastest/best solution to this question?
    – Ben
    May 24, 2016 at 21:03
  • 2
    @Ben, in this case, fastest answer is still this, yes. .SD optimisation for these cases is still on the list. Have an eye on #735.
    – Arun
    May 24, 2016 at 22:26
  • 8
    Hi, What is $V1 here? #noob Jun 1, 2016 at 13:53
  • 1
    Accessing the auto-named column. Run it without it to understand better.
    – Arun
    Jun 1, 2016 at 14:19
  • 2
    @HappyCoding, have a look at ?`.I` and see if the explanation and examples there help?
    – Arun
    Jun 29, 2017 at 23:15
107

The most intuitive method is to use group_by and top_n function in dplyr

group %>% group_by(Subject) %>% top_n(1, pt)

The result you get is

Source: local data frame [3 x 3]
Groups: Subject [3]

  Subject    pt Event
    (dbl) (dbl) (dbl)
1       1     5     2
2       2    17     2
3       3     5     2
2
  • 2
    dplyr is also useful when you want to access the smallest and largest value in a group because the values are available as an array. So you can first sort by pt descending and then use pt[1] or first(pt) to get the highest value: group %>% group_by(Subject) %>% arrange(desc(pt), .by_group = TRUE) %>% summarise(max_pt=first(pt), min_pt=last(pt), Event=first(Event))
    – cw'
    Jan 16, 2019 at 9:39
  • 10
    This will include multiple rows if there are ties. Use slice(which.max(pt)) to only include one row per group.
    – cakraww
    Jul 18, 2019 at 15:14
51

A shorter solution using data.table:

setDT(group)[, .SD[which.max(pt)], by=Subject]
#    Subject pt Event
# 1:       1  5     2
# 2:       2 17     2
# 3:       3  5     2
4
  • 7
    Note that, this can be slower than group[group[, .I[which.max(pt)], by=Subject]$V1] as proposed above by @Arun; see comparisons here Jan 21, 2019 at 16:56
  • 1
    I like this one because it's fast enough for my current context and easier to grok for me vs the .I version
    – arvi1000
    Jul 19, 2019 at 22:07
  • setDT(group)[, .SD[ pt== max(pt) ] , by=Subject]
    – Ferroao
    Feb 20, 2020 at 22:03
  • How do you exclude cases where you have two max values? Jul 20 at 16:59
29

Another option is slice

library(dplyr)
group %>%
     group_by(Subject) %>%
     slice(which.max(pt))
#    Subject    pt Event
#    <dbl> <dbl> <dbl>
#1       1     5     2
#2       2    17     2
#3       3     5     2
0
18

A dplyr solution:

library(dplyr)
ID <- c(1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3)
Value <- c(2,3,5,2,5,8,17,3,5)
Event <- c(1,1,2,1,2,1,2,2,2)
group <- data.frame(Subject=ID, pt=Value, Event=Event)

group %>%
    group_by(Subject) %>%
    summarize(max.pt = max(pt))

This yields the following data frame:

  Subject max.pt
1       1      5
2       2     17
3       3      5
1
  • 14
    I think the OP wants to keep the Event column in the subset in which case you could do: df %>% group_by(Subject) %>% filter(pt == max(pt)) (includes ties if present)
    – talat
    Jul 3, 2014 at 18:11
17

Since {dplyr} v1.0.0 (May 2020) there is the new slice_* syntax which supersedes top_n().

See also https://dplyr.tidyverse.org/reference/slice.html.

library(tidyverse)

ID    <- c(1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3)
Value <- c(2,3,5,2,5,8,17,3,5)
Event <- c(1,1,2,1,2,1,2,2,2)

group <- data.frame(Subject=ID, pt=Value, Event=Event)

group %>% 
  group_by(Subject) %>% 
  slice_max(pt)
#> # A tibble: 3 x 3
#> # Groups:   Subject [3]
#>   Subject    pt Event
#>     <dbl> <dbl> <dbl>
#> 1       1     5     2
#> 2       2    17     2
#> 3       3     5     2

Created on 2020-08-18 by the reprex package (v0.3.0.9001)

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10
do.call(rbind, lapply(split(group,as.factor(group$Subject)), function(x) {return(x[which.max(x$pt),])}))

Using Base R

8

I wasn't sure what you wanted to do about the Event column, but if you want to keep that as well, how about

isIDmax <- with(dd, ave(Value, ID, FUN=function(x) seq_along(x)==which.max(x)))==1
group[isIDmax, ]

#   ID Value Event
# 3  1     5     2
# 7  2    17     2
# 9  3     5     2

Here we use ave to look at the "Value" column for each "ID". Then we determine which value is the maximal and then turn that into a logical vector we can use to subset the original data.frame.

2
  • Thanks very much but I have another question here. Why use with function in this method since ave(Value, ID, FUN=function(x) seq_along(x)==which.max(x))==1 works extremely fine? I am a little bit confused. Jul 4, 2014 at 12:38
  • I used with because it's a bit odd to have the data available both inside and outside the group data.frame. If you read the data in with read.table or something, you would need to use with because those column names would not be available outside the data.frame.
    – MrFlick
    Jul 4, 2014 at 15:56
7

One more base R solution:

merge(aggregate(pt ~ Subject, max, data = group), group)

  Subject pt Event
1       1  5     2
2       2 17     2
3       3  5     2
6

Another base solution

group_sorted <- group[order(group$Subject, -group$pt),]
group_sorted[!duplicated(group_sorted$Subject),]

# Subject pt Event
#       1  5     2
#       2 17     2
#       3  5     2

Order the data frame by pt (descending) and then remove rows duplicated in Subject

2

Here's another data.table solution, since which.max does not work on characters

library(data.table)
group <- data.table(Subject=ID, pt=Value, Event=Event)

group[, .SD[order(pt, decreasing = TRUE) == 1], by = Subject]
2

In base you can use ave to get max per group and compare this with pt and get a logical vector to subset the data.frame.

group[group$pt == ave(group$pt, group$Subject, FUN=max),]
#  Subject pt Event
#3       1  5     2
#7       2 17     2
#9       3  5     2

Or compare it already in the function.

group[as.logical(ave(group$pt, group$Subject, FUN=function(x) x==max(x))),]
#group[ave(group$pt, group$Subject, FUN=function(x) x==max(x))==1,] #Variant
#  Subject pt Event
#3       1  5     2
#7       2 17     2
#9       3  5     2
1

Another data.table solution:

library(data.table)
setDT(group)[, head(.SD[order(-pt)], 1), by = .(Subject)]
1

by is a version of tapply for data frames:

res <- by(group, group$Subject, FUN=function(df) df[which.max(df$pt),])

It returns an object of class by so we convert it to data frame:

do.call(rbind, b)
  Subject pt Event
1       1  5     2
2       2 17     2
3       3  5     2
0

Another data.table option:

library(data.table)
setDT(group)
group[group[order(-pt), .I[1L], Subject]$V1]

Or another (less readable but slightly faster):

group[group[, rn := .I][order(Subject, -pt), {
    rn[c(1L, 1L + which(diff(Subject)>0L))]
}]]

timing code:

library(data.table)
nr <- 1e7L
ng <- nr/4L
set.seed(0L)
DT <- data.table(Subject=sample(ng, nr, TRUE), pt=1:nr)#rnorm(nr))
DT2 <- copy(DT)


microbenchmark::microbenchmark(times=3L,
    mtd0 = {a0 <- DT[DT[, .I[which.max(pt)], by=Subject]$V1]},
    mtd1 = {a1 <- DT[DT[order(-pt), .I[1L], Subject]$V1]},
    mtd2 = {a2 <- DT2[DT2[, rn := .I][
        order(Subject, -pt), rn[c(TRUE, diff(Subject)>0L)]
    ]]},
    mtd3 = {a3 <- unique(DT[order(Subject, -pt)], by="Subject")}
)
fsetequal(a0[order(Subject)], a1[order(Subject)])
#[1] TRUE
fsetequal(a0[order(Subject)], a2[, rn := NULL][order(Subject)])
#[1] TRUE
fsetequal(a0[order(Subject)], a3[order(Subject)])
#[1] TRUE

timings:

Unit: seconds
 expr      min       lq     mean   median       uq      max neval
 mtd0 3.256322 3.335412 3.371439 3.414502 3.428998 3.443493     3
 mtd1 1.733162 1.748538 1.786033 1.763915 1.812468 1.861022     3
 mtd2 1.136307 1.159606 1.207009 1.182905 1.242359 1.301814     3
 mtd3 1.123064 1.166161 1.228058 1.209257 1.280554 1.351851     3
0

Using dplyr 1.0.2 there are now two ways to do this, one is long hand and the other is using the verb across():

      # create data
      ID    <- c(1,1,1,2,2,2,2,3,3)
      Value <- c(2,3,5,2,5,8,17,3,5)
      Event <- c(1,1,2,1,2,1,2,2,2)
      
      group <- data.frame(Subject=ID, pt=Value, Event=Event)

Long hand the verb is max() but note the na.rm = TRUE which is useful for examples where there are NAs as in the closed question: Merge rows in a dataframe where the rows are disjoint and contain NAs:

       group %>% 
        group_by(Subject) %>% 
        summarise(pt = max(pt, na.rm = TRUE),
                  Event = max(Event, na.rm = TRUE))

This is ok if there are only a few columns but if the table has many columns across() is useful. The examples for this verb are often with summarise(across(start_with... but in this example the columns don't start with the same characters. Either they could be changed or the positions listed:

    group %>% 
        group_by(Subject) %>% 
        summarise(across(1:ncol(group)-1, max, na.rm = TRUE, .names = "{.col}"))

Note for the verb across() 1 refers to the first column after the first actual column so using ncol(group) won't work as that is too many columns (makes it position 4 rather than 3).

-1

If you want the biggest pt value for a subject, you could simply use:

   pt_max = as.data.frame(aggregate(pt~Subject, group, max))

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