I am using Retrofit/OkHttp (1.6) in my Android project.

I don't find any request retry mechanism built-in to either of them. On searching more, I read OkHttp seems to have silent-retries. I don't see that happening on any of my connections (HTTP or HTTPS). How to configure retries with okclient ?

For now, I am catching exceptions and retrying maintaining a counter variable.

  • @JesseWilson: I find retrying more useful for slower networks, than longer connection timeouts. Do you think otherwise ? – Jaguar Jul 4 '14 at 4:49
  • 5
    sometimes an api will have a response code that will indicate another request needs to be made (to re-up auth tokens, or session tokens or XYZ tokens) and then the original request retried. This is easy to accomplish in Volley. I would love to switch to retrofit, but I don't see a way to accomplish this sort of plumbing in a generic way. – danb Jul 6 '14 at 23:38
  • Did you find out a better method than just catching response exceptions, @SlowAndSteady? I'm currently implementing this on a larger scale and thought my similar method is due for a refactor. Thanks. – Joshua Pinter Jul 16 '14 at 18:24
  • @JoshPinter : Sorry, couldn't find anything else. I am not sure if OhHttp 2.0 has added support for this - you might want to have a look. – Jaguar Jul 17 '14 at 19:24
  • @SlowAndSteady Okay, great, thanks for the update. For the record, I've decided to use a pattern similar to what was outlined here: stackoverflow.com/a/8658067/293280 – Joshua Pinter Jul 17 '14 at 21:27

10 Answers 10

up vote 63 down vote accepted

For Retrofit 1.x;

You can use Interceptors. Create a custom interceptor

    OkHttpClient client = new OkHttpClient();
    client.setConnectTimeout(CONNECT_TIMEOUT_MILLIS, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);
    client.setReadTimeout(READ_TIMEOUT_MILLIS, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);
    client.interceptors().add(new Interceptor() {
        @Override
        public Response intercept(Chain chain) throws IOException {
            Request request = chain.request();

            // try the request
            Response response = chain.proceed(request);

            int tryCount = 0;
            while (!response.isSuccessful() && tryCount < 3) {

                Log.d("intercept", "Request is not successful - " + tryCount);

                tryCount++;

                // retry the request
                response = chain.proceed(request);
            }

            // otherwise just pass the original response on
            return response;
        }
    });

And use it while creating RestAdapter.

new RestAdapter.Builder()
        .setEndpoint(API_URL)
        .setRequestInterceptor(requestInterceptor)
        .setClient(new OkClient(client))
        .build()
        .create(Adapter.class);

For Retrofit 2.x;

You can use Call.clone() method to clone request and execute it.

  • when it is timed out on connection, response will be null. With that, how can we check response.isSuccessful() ? – cgr Nov 30 '15 at 16:36
  • Hey requestInterceptor is not – Dheeraj Bhaskar Dec 23 '15 at 2:43
  • But is there a way counting the retries? Clone just copies the call so it can be executed again but it doesn't count. – Tobias Reich Feb 3 '17 at 9:06
  • I config the timeout as 60second.And want to know whether the 60s is all the 1+3retry connection timeout or just one connection's timeout – Ninja Mar 31 '17 at 3:59

I don't know if this is an option for you but you could use RxJava together with Retrofit.

Retrofit is able to return Observables upon rest calls. On Oberservables you can just call retry(count) to resubscribe to the Observable when it emits an error.

You would have to define the call in your interface like this:

@GET("/data.json")
Observable<DataResponse> fetchSomeData();

Then you can subscribe to this Observable like this:

restApi.fetchSomeData()
.retry(5)  // Retry the call 5 times if it errors
.subscribeOn(Schedulers.io())  // execute the call asynchronously
.observeOn(AndroidSchedulers.mainThread())  // handle the results in the ui thread
.subscribe(onComplete, onError); 
// onComplete and onError are of type Action1<DataResponse>, Action1<Throwable>
// Here you can define what to do with the results

I had the same problem like you and this was actually my solution. RxJava is a really nice library to use in combination with Retrofit. You can even do many cool things in addition to retrying (like e.g. composing and chaining calls).

  • this is really nice and clean approach. thank you @joluet – Tomo Sep 24 '14 at 11:56
  • 8
    Did you ever try this? It seems like calling retry() (or just subscribing again) on a Retrofit Observable does not actually do the request again. – pocmo Nov 21 '14 at 10:57
  • @pocmo pls see my response, maybe it will help – Sniper Jul 31 '16 at 23:32

The problem with response.isSuccessful() is when you have an exception like SocketTimeoutException.

I modified the original code to fix it.

OkHttpClient client = new OkHttpClient();
client.setConnectTimeout(CONNECT_TIMEOUT_MILLIS, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);
client.setReadTimeout(READ_TIMEOUT_MILLIS, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);
client.interceptors().add(new Interceptor() {
    @Override
    public Response intercept(Chain chain) throws IOException {
        Request request = chain.request();
        Response response = null;
        boolean responseOK = false;
        int tryCount = 0;

        while (!responseOK && tryCount < 3) {
            try {
                 response = chain.proceed(request);
                 responseOK = response.isSuccessful();                  
            }catch (Exception e){
                 Log.d("intercept", "Request is not successful - " + tryCount);                     
            }finally{
                 tryCount++;      
            }
        }

        // otherwise just pass the original response on
        return response;
    }
});

Hope it helps. Regards.

  • But this will retry even if server is down or any other case – Killer Jul 31 '17 at 21:13
  • It crashes when internet is not available. I am trying request over SSL, adding custom headers and added one other logging interceptor. – Awesome Sep 1 '17 at 15:42
  • If we have timeout or no connection, it returns null and then it generate NullPointerException – Евгений Сотник May 7 at 9:42
  • OkHttpClient does not have a setConnectTimeout method, and interceptors() is immutable. Could it be that this answer is based on an old version? I am using <dependency> <groupId>com.squareup.okhttp3</groupId> <artifactId>okhttp</artifactId> <version>3.11.0</version> </dependency> – Tilman Hausherr Oct 25 at 16:08

I found the way(OKHttpClient intercepter) provided by Sinan Kozak does not work when http connection failed, there is nothing yet concerned with HTTP response.

So i use another way to hook the Observable object, call .retryWhen on it. Also, i have added retryCount limit.

import retrofit2.Call;
import retrofit2.CallAdapter;
import retrofit2.Retrofit;
import retrofit2.adapter.rxjava.HttpException;
import retrofit2.adapter.rxjava.RxJavaCallAdapterFactory;
import retrofit2.converter.jackson.JacksonConverterFactory;
import rx.Observable;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.lang.annotation.Annotation;
import java.lang.reflect.Type;

Then

    RxJavaCallAdapterFactory originCallAdaptorFactory = RxJavaCallAdapterFactory.create();

    CallAdapter.Factory newCallAdaptorFactory = new CallAdapter.Factory() {
        @Override
        public CallAdapter<?> get(Type returnType, Annotation[] annotations, Retrofit retrofit) {

            CallAdapter<?> ca = originCallAdaptorFactory.get(returnType, annotations, retrofit);

            return new CallAdapter<Observable<?>>() {

                @Override
                public Type responseType() {
                    return ca.responseType();
                }

                int restRetryCount = 3;

                @Override
                public <R> Observable<?> adapt(Call<R> call) {
                    Observable<?> rx = (Observable<?>) ca.adapt(call);

                    return rx.retryWhen(errors -> errors.flatMap(error -> {
                        boolean needRetry = false;
                        if (restRetryCount >= 1) {
                            if (error instanceof IOException) {
                                needRetry = true;
                            } else if (error instanceof HttpException) {
                                if (((HttpException) error).code() != 200) {
                                    needRetry = true;
                                }
                            }
                        }

                        if (needRetry) {
                            restRetryCount--;
                            return Observable.just(null);
                        } else {
                            return Observable.error(error);
                        }
                    }));
                }
            };
        }
    };                

Then add or replace

.addCallAdapterFactory(RxJavaCallAdapterFactory.create())

with

.addCallAdapterFactory(newCallAdaptorFactory)

For example:

return new Retrofit
        .Builder()
        .baseUrl(baseUrl)
        .client(okClient)
        .addCallAdapterFactory(newCallAdaptorFactory)
        .addConverterFactory(JacksonConverterFactory.create(objectMapper));

Note: For simplicity, i just treat HTTP code > 404 code as retry, please modify it for yourself.

Besides, if http response is 200, then above rx.retryWhen will not get called, if you insist check such a response, you can add rx.subscribeOn(...throw error... before .retryWhen.

For those prefer an interceptor to deal with the issue of retrying - Building upon Sinan's answer, here is my proposed interceptor, which includes both retry count and back-off delay, and only retries attempts when network is available, and when request wasn't cancelled. (only deals with IOExceptions (SocketTimeout, UnknownHost, etc.))

    builder.addInterceptor(new Interceptor() {
        @Override
        public Response intercept(Chain chain) throws IOException {
            Request request = chain.request();

            // try the request
            Response response = null;
            int tryCount = 1;
            while (tryCount <= MAX_TRY_COUNT) {
                try {
                    response = chain.proceed(request);
                    break;
                } catch (Exception e) {
                    if (!NetworkUtils.isNetworkAvailable()) {
                        // if no internet, dont bother retrying request
                        throw e;
                    }
                    if ("Canceled".equalsIgnoreCase(e.getMessage())) {
                        // Request canceled, do not retry
                        throw e;
                    }
                    if (tryCount >= MAX_TRY_COUNT) {
                        // max retry count reached, giving up
                        throw e;
                    }

                    try {
                        // sleep delay * try count (e.g. 1st retry after 3000ms, 2nd after 6000ms, etc.)
                        Thread.sleep(RETRY_BACKOFF_DELAY * tryCount);
                    } catch (InterruptedException e1) {
                        throw new RuntimeException(e1);
                    }
                    tryCount++;
                }
            }

            // otherwise just pass the original response on
            return response;
        }
    });

Courtesy to the top answer,This is what worked for me. If there is a connectivity issues, its better to wait for a few seconds before retry.

public class ErrorInterceptor implements Interceptor {
ICacheManager cacheManager;
Response response = null;
int tryCount = 0;
int maxLimit = 3;
int waitThreshold = 5000;
@Inject
public ErrorInterceptor() {

}

@Override
public Response intercept(Chain chain){

   // String language =  cacheManager.readPreference(PreferenceKeys.LANGUAGE_CODE);
  Request request = chain.request();
  response =  sendReqeust(chain,request);
    while (response ==null && tryCount < maxLimit) {
        Log.d("intercept", "Request failed - " + tryCount);
        tryCount++;
        try {
            Thread.sleep(waitThreshold); // force wait the network thread for 5 seconds
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
       response = sendReqeust(chain,request);
    }
    return response;
}

private Response sendReqeust(Chain chain, Request request){
    try {
        response = chain.proceed(request);
        if(!response.isSuccessful())
            return null;
        else
        return response;
    } catch (IOException e) {
      return null;
    }
}

}

It seems it will be present in retrofit 2.0 from the API Spec: https://github.com/square/retrofit/issues/297. Currently, the best way seems to be catch exception and retry manually.

As stated in the docs, a better might be to use the baked in authenticators, eg: private final OkHttpClient client = new OkHttpClient();

  public void run() throws Exception {
    client.setAuthenticator(new Authenticator() {
      @Override public Request authenticate(Proxy proxy, Response response) {
        System.out.println("Authenticating for response: " + response);
        System.out.println("Challenges: " + response.challenges());
        String credential = Credentials.basic("jesse", "password1");
        return response.request().newBuilder()
            .header("Authorization", credential)
            .build();
      }

      @Override public Request authenticateProxy(Proxy proxy, Response response) {
        return null; // Null indicates no attempt to authenticate.
      }
    });

    Request request = new Request.Builder()
        .url("http://publicobject.com/secrets/hellosecret.txt")
        .build();

    Response response = client.newCall(request).execute();
    if (!response.isSuccessful()) throw new IOException("Unexpected code " + response);

    System.out.println(response.body().string());
  }

I have play a lot with this problem trying to find how is the best way to retry Retrofit requests. I am using Retrofit 2 so my solution is for Retrofit 2. For Retrofit 1 you have to use Interceptor like the accepted answer here. The answer of @joluet is correct but he did not mention that retry method need to be called before .subscribe(onComplete, onError) method. This is very important otherwise the request wouldn't be retried again like @pocmo mentioned in @joluet answer. Here is my example:

final Observable<List<NewsDatum>> newsDetailsObservable = apiService.getCandidateNewsItem(newsId).map((newsDetailsParseObject) -> {
                    return newsDetailsParseObject;
                });

newsDetailsObservable.subscribeOn(Schedulers.io())
            .observeOn(AndroidSchedulers.mainThread())
            .retry((integer, throwable) -> {
                //MAX_NUMBER_TRY is your maximum try number
                if(integer <= MAX_NUMBER_TRY){
                    return true;//this will retry the observable (request)
                }
                return false;//this will not retry and it will go inside onError method
            })
            .subscribe(new Subscriber<List<NewsDatum>>() {
                @Override
                public void onCompleted() {
                    // do nothing
                }

                @Override
                public void onError(Throwable e) {
                   //do something with the error
                }

                @Override
                public void onNext(List<NewsDatum> apiNewsDatum) {
                    //do something with the parsed data
                }
            });

apiService is my RetrofitServiceProvider object.

BTW : I am using Java 8 so a lot of lambda expressions are inside the code.

  • I have done this, and according to my logs, retrofitl only call network once. There is something wrong with this method! – Mohsen Mirhoseini Oct 31 '16 at 16:34

Just want to share my version. It uses rxJava retryWhen method. My version retries connection every N=15 sec and almost immediately emit retry when internet connection recover.

public class RetryWithDelayOrInternet implements Function<Flowable<? extends Throwable>, Flowable<?>> {
public static boolean isInternetUp;
private int retryCount;

@Override
public Flowable<?> apply(final Flowable<? extends Throwable> attempts) {
    return Flowable.fromPublisher(s -> {
        while (true) {
            retryCount++;
            try {
                Thread.sleep(1000);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                attempts.subscribe(s);
                break;
            }
            if (isInternetUp || retryCount == 15) {
                retryCount = 0;
                s.onNext(new Object());
            }
        }
    })
            .subscribeOn(Schedulers.single());
}}

And you should use it before .subscribe like this:

.retryWhen(new RetryWithDelayOrInternet())

You should manually change isInternetUp field

public class InternetConnectionReceiver extends BroadcastReceiver {


@Override
public void onReceive(Context context, Intent intent) {
    boolean networkAvailable = isNetworkAvailable(context);
    RetryWithDelayOrInternet.isInternetUp = networkAvailable;
}
public static boolean isNetworkAvailable(Context context) {
    ConnectivityManager connectivityManager = (ConnectivityManager) context.getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);
    NetworkInfo activeNetworkInfo = connectivityManager.getActiveNetworkInfo();
    return activeNetworkInfo != null && activeNetworkInfo.isConnected();
}}

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