2

I'm currently facing a situation where I am decorating my HttpPost Controller action methods with specific Authorize Attributes as well as specifying the same rules in my HttpGet to ensure certain functionality isn't available on my view.

Is there a best practice or better solution so that I can specify the actual business rules in one place to enable DRY as well as not get into a situation of code explosion i.e. having a specific Authorize attribute for every rule..

My current situation looks like:

public class MyController
{

   [HttpGet]
   public ActionResult List()
   {
       // This action is responsible for showing the list of records.  Each record
       // can potentially have a delete link but this is only shown for Administrators

       var viewModel = new MyViewModel()
       {
          CanDeleteRecordRole = Role.Administrator, // Duplicated rule here
          // other properties
       }
   }

   [HttpPost]
   [Authorize(Role.Administrator)]
   public ActionResult Delete(int id)
   {
      /// do stuff
   }
}

public class Role
{
   public const string Administrator = "Administrator";
}

Then in my view using an extension method I would use the CanDeleteRecordRole such as:

@if(Model.DisplayIfAuthorized(Model.CanDeleteRecordRole))
{
   <th>Delete record</th>
}

// and for td columns

@if(Model.DisplayIfAuthorized(Model.CanDeleteRecordRole))
{
   <td>My action link here for deletion</td>
}
  • Not to be pedantic but I think I think it is easy to make a meaningful argument in this case that the protection provided by the attribute on the controller action is not an expression of the same business rule as the @if statements in the markup. They apply to same role in this case and are in the same vicinity in your code (same V/C) but they are really different rules. The condition Model.CanDeleteRecordRole could apply to a totally different role than Admin (if you needed it that way). The markup condition is much more granular is the best way to say it. – David Tansey Jul 3 '14 at 22:17
  • I think I misread the relation of your shown controller and views but still you want to keep what you have. If you go with only the part that skips rendering the delete links you still will have an exposed controller action that could be invoked from the client-side outside of your intended auth scheme. It would require some knowledge and likely be malicious but leaving off the ATTRIBUTE in the name of DRY principles is probably not the best choice here. HTH – David Tansey Jul 3 '14 at 22:22
  • Thanks David. Yeah I'm not looking at leaving off the attribute but rather how I could combine the authorization requirement. For example. If suddenly delete become Admin + another role I would rather change it in one place rather than have to remember to do it in multiple etc... – dreza Jul 3 '14 at 22:33
  • I have not tried this technique but definitely interest me. I will be trying it out when I get a chance. It may be close to what you are looking for: Don't do Role Based do Activity-based auth checking – David Tansey Jul 3 '14 at 23:00
  • @DavidTansey Thanks for the link. I'll have to digest the article, but might be something worth investigating. Anything might be better than what I'm doing now I'm thinking. – dreza Jul 4 '14 at 2:34
1

Yes, there is definitely a way to decouple business logic from authorization logic and do DRY. That area is called externalized authorization management (EAM) (see Gartner's definition).

To achieve EAM, you need to use more than just roles. You need to use attributes where an attribute is essentially just a key-value pair e.g. citizenship=Canadian, clearance=SECRET, department=sales...

Roles are not enough. To quote the article previously shared in the comments:

What’s Wrong With Role-Based Authorization Checks?

Plenty of authorization systems have been created with role-based checks, so what’s wrong with them? A lot of things, including documentation and coupling, modeling and encapsulation issues, and requirements growth and change.

Role-based authorization (also known as Role-based access control or RBAC) is not flexible enough to express rich authorization scenarios. You need to turn to ABAC, the Attribute-Based Access Control model as defined by NIST.

With ABAC you can easily implement rules such as:

  • a user can edit the document he/she owns
  • a user can view all the documents that belong to the same department
  • a user with the role reviewer can approve a document if the document is a draft and the document sensitivity is equal to or less than the user's clearance.

There are no limits to what you can express in ABAC.

The de-facto standard and technology available out there to implement ABAC is XACML, the eXtensible Access Control Markup Language. XACML defines:

  • an authorization architecture with the notion of
    • an external policy decision point (PDP) where decisions are reached
    • a policy enforcement point (PEP) that protects your application / code / API and calls out to the PDP
    • a policy information point (PIP) used to retrieve additional attributes and metadata.
  • a request/response scheme: how to ask questions and get answers back e.g. Can Alice view document #123?
  • a rich policy language to implement policies such as the examples I previously gave.

In XACML, all the policies become centralized in one single location. Some of the benefits include: - faster development time: you no longer need to write authorization code (if/else) in your application - better security: you can use the same policies across all your applications no matter the language or technology. My answer is therefore not specific to .NET - better audit capability: if you move your authZ logic to a central policy-based point, then it is easier to inspect them - implement the DRY principle.

These are but a few benefits available.

There are several open-source and vendor solutions out there such as:

HTH, David.

1

The way I've approached this problem in the past is to create an abstraction. Instead of referring to the role that is allowed to do stuff, refer to a string constant that contains the roles allowed to do stuff. Like so:

public class Role
{
    public const string DeleteRoles = "Administrator, role2, role3";
    ....
}

Then create a method that can interpret these string constants (I put this in a custom principle):

public class CustomPrincipal
{
    ...
    public bool IsInRoles(string roles)
    {
        bool authorized = false;

        var roles = roles.Split(',');
        foreach (var role in roles)
        {
            if (this.CurrentPrincipal.IsInRole(role)
            {
                authorized = true;
                break;
            }
        }

        return authorized;
    }
    ...
}

Then create a custom Authorization attribute that can use these string constants via the IsInRoles() method:

public class CustomAuthorizeAttribute: AuthorizeAttribute
{
    public string Roles { get; set; }

    protected override bool AuthorizeCore(HttpContextBase httpContext)
    {
        var isAuthorized = base.AuthorizeCore(httpContext);
        if (!isAuthorized)
        {
            return false;
        }

        isAuthorized = CustomPrincipal.Current.IsInRoles(this.Roles);

        return isAuthorized;
    }

}

which you use on your Action methods like so:

[HttpPost]
[CustomAuthorize(Roles = Role.DeleteRoles)]
public ActionResult Delete(int id)
{
    /// do stuff
}

Then in the view you can use the IsInRoles() method directly:

@if(CustomPrincipal.Current.IsInRoles(Role.DeleteRoles))
{
   <th>Delete record</th>
}

You can implement this in various ways but the key is the abstraction.

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