15

First, spec. We use MVC5, .NET 4.5.1, and Entity framework 6.1.

In our MVC5 business application we have a lot of repetitive CRUD code. My job is to "automate" most of it, which means extracting it to base classes and making it reusable. Right now, I have base classes for controllers, view models and EF6 entity models.

My abstract base class that all EF6 entities inherit:

public abstract class BaseEntity<TSubclass>
    where TSubclass : BaseEntity<TSubclass>
{
    public abstract Expression<Func<TSubclass, object>> UpdateCriterion();
}

UpdateCriterion method is used in AddOrUpdate method of database context. I have a generic parameter for subclasses because UpdateCriterion needs to return lambda expression that uses exact subclass type, not an interface or base class. An extremely simplified subclass implementing this abstract base class would look like this:

public class Worker : BaseEntity<Worker>
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public int Name { get; set; }

    public override Expression<Func<Worker, object>> UpdateCriterion()
    {
        return worker => worker.ID;
    }
}

After that, in SaveOrUpdate action of my base controller, I would have code like this:

public ActionResult Save(TViewModel viewModel)
{
    if (ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        var entityModel = viewModel.ConstructEntityModel();
        db.Set<TEntityModel>().AddOrUpdate<TEntityModel>(entityModel.UpdateCriterion(), entityModel);
        db.SaveChanges();
    }
}

Thanks to that, subclasses of the base controller don't need to implement Save method themselves, as they did before. Now, all of this works, and it actually works really well despite the funky syntax (I mean, class BaseEntity<TSubclass> where TSubclass : BaseEntity<TSubclass>, seriously?).

Here comes my problem. For most of the entities field ID is the key, but for some it isn't, so I can't generalise properly with a superclass implementation. So for now, every entity subclass implements it's own UpdateCriterion. But, since for most (90%+) entities e => e.ID is the correct implementation, I have a lot of duplication. So I want to rewrite the entity base class to something like this:

public abstract class BaseEntity<TSubclass> 
    where TSubclass : BaseEntity<TSubclass>
{
    public virtual Expression<Func<TSubclass, object>> UpdateCriterion()
    {
        return entity => ((dynamic)entity).ID;
    }
}

The intention is to provide default implementation that uses ID as key, and allow subclasses to override it if they use a different key. I can't use an interface or a base class with ID field because not all entities have it. I thought I'd use dynamic to pull out ID field, but I get following error: Error: An expression tree may not contain a dynamic operation.

So, any idea on how to do this? Would reflection work in base UpdateCriterion?

1

No, you cannot use dynamic in a Linq to Entities query. But you can build the Lambda Expression at runtime.

public virtual Expression<Func<TSubclass, object>> UpdateCriterion()
{
    var param = Expression.Parameter(typeof(TSubclass));
    var body = Expression.Convert(Expression.Property(param, "ID"), typeof(object));

    return Expression.Lambda<Func<TSubclass, object>>(body, param);
}

If the TSubclass type does not have an ID property Expression.Property(param, "ID") will throw an exception.

Additionally you could use the MetadataWorkspace from your entity model to get the Primary Key column for TSubclass.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks, this was exactly what I needed! – Davor Jul 7 '14 at 7:45
  • Oh, additionally, do you know how to add multiple fields in that body part? like e => new {e.ID, e.Name}? – Davor Jul 7 '14 at 7:51
  • Do you meen how to build e => new {e.ID, e.Name}? with the Expression classes? – codeworx Jul 7 '14 at 9:22
  • 1
    In this case the body would be an Expression.MemberInit. The Problem is the anonymous type. If you write a Lambda with p => new { p.Prop1, p.Prop2 } the compiler creates a concrete type with the matching properties. If you create the MemberInit at runtime the anonymous Type does not exist, so you have to provide a valid existing type. Expression.MemberInit(Expression.New(typeof(PrimaryKeyWithTwoValues<int,string>)),Expression.Bind(...)); or create one dynamically with Reflection.Emit. – codeworx Jul 7 '14 at 11:53
  • Thanks man, you're awesome. Do you have any resource where I could learn stuff like this? Everything I find about lambdas is just anonymous functions and some LINQ. – Davor Jul 7 '14 at 13:27
1

If you are defining the BaseEntity class, you could add a virtual read only property that returns the actual ID property. I beleive EF treats read only properties as "computed", so they are not stored to the db.

public abstract class BaseEntity<TSubclass> where TSubclass : BaseEntity<TSubclass>
{
    public abstract object ID { get; }
    public virtual Expression<Func<TSubclass, object>> UpdateCriterion()
    {
        return entity => entity.ID;
    }
}

public partial class Foo : BaseEntity<Foo>
{
    public Int32 FooId { get; set; }
    public override object ID { get { return FooId; } } 
}

Just a thought - I only tried compiling in LinqPad and checking the value of a call to UpdateCriterion. :)

| improve this answer | |
0

Take a look at this answer. It uses reflection to get the ID Property. I think it solves your problem:

public static object GetPropValue(object src, string propName)
{
    return src.GetType().GetProperty(propName).GetValue(src, null);
}

Then you replace your lambda expression by

return entity => GetPropValue(entity, "ID");

I've not tested, since I have no code fully working to test it. If it works please let us know.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I'm pretty sure he does not need the value, he needs the Expression. – codeworx Jul 4 '14 at 17:38
  • no problem. a Lambda Exp can have method calls (except for some specific cases e.g. an Expression compiled to SQL) – Rafael Brasil Jul 4 '14 at 18:31
  • Yes, but in this case the result is used for the AddOrUpdate Method of a DbSet. And this method needs the PropertyExpression. – codeworx Jul 4 '14 at 19:14

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