233

When editing an issue and clicking Preview the following markdown source:

a
b
c

shows every letter on a new line.

However, it seems to me that pushing similar markdown source structure in README.md joins all the letters on one line.

I'd like the new lines preserved in the README.md in this project: https://github.com/zoran119/simple-read-only-test

Any idea how?

474

Interpreting newlines as <br /> used to be a feature of Github-flavored markdown, but the most recent help document no longer lists this feature.

Fortunately, you can do it manually. The easiest way is to ensure that each line ends with two spaces. So, change

a
b
c

into

a__
b__
c

(where _ is a blank space).

Or, you can add explicit <br /> tags.

a <br />
b <br />
c
  • 2
    Thank you so much. My documents will be much better now! – Guilherme Ferreira Aug 29 '16 at 16:20
  • 2
    according to stackoverflow.com/questions/18019957/… Github-favored markdown is not used everywhere on Github. Might be outdated though. – Ben Creasy Mar 18 '17 at 22:48
  • Gracias mi amigo! – Ev. Oct 29 '17 at 12:23
  • According to the link you give, it's now possible to create line breaks "by leaving a blank line between lines of text." There is still a problem: with this method, you create a new paragraph, not just a line break. – Pierre Oct 28 '18 at 15:30
  • 2
    Forward slash doesn't seem to be necessary, worked fine with just <br> – user3015682 Aug 24 '19 at 23:03
2

If you want to be a little bit fancier you can also create it as an html list to create something like bullets or numbers using ul or ol.

<ul>
<li>Line 1</li>
<li>Line 2</li>
</ul>
0

Just use back slash in the end of the line.
So this:
a\
b\
c
will then look like:

a
b
c

Notice that there is no backslash in the end of the last line(after the 'c' character).

-2

According to Github API two empty lines are a new paragraph (same as here in stackoverflow)

You can test it with http://prose.io

  • 1
    The question is about new line within a paragraph – Christian Seiler Mar 6 '18 at 10:56

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