Suppose I want to calculate the proportion of different values within each group. For example, using the mtcars data, how do I calculate the relative frequency of number of gears by am (automatic/manual) in one go with dplyr?

library(dplyr)
data(mtcars)
mtcars <- tbl_df(mtcars)

# count frequency
mtcars %>%
  group_by(am, gear) %>%
  summarise(n = n())

# am gear  n
#  0    3 15 
#  0    4  4 
#  1    4  8  
#  1    5  5 

What I would like to achieve:

am gear  n rel.freq
 0    3 15      0.7894737
 0    4  4      0.2105263
 1    4  8      0.6153846
 1    5  5      0.3846154
  • 1
    Are those percentages the actual numbers you want? Where are they coming from, algebraically? Ah, 79% is 15/(15+4), 21% is 4/(15+4) and then for am==1 62% is 8/(8+5) etc. Got it. – Spacedman Jul 4 '14 at 14:35
  • 1
    @Spacedman Yes, those are the number I want and Frank is correct, they sum to 100% by the am variable (79+21) and (62+38).. – jenswirf Jul 4 '14 at 14:41
  • 2
    This really seems to be looking for a native dplyr implementation of prop.table()/sweep(). Also, in other questions some people are asking for the option to include zero-counts for variables or variable-interactions – smci Apr 26 '16 at 21:25
up vote 191 down vote accepted

Try this:

mtcars %>%
  group_by(am, gear) %>%
  summarise (n = n()) %>%
  mutate(freq = n / sum(n))

#   am gear  n      freq
# 1  0    3 15 0.7894737
# 2  0    4  4 0.2105263
# 3  1    4  8 0.6153846
# 4  1    5  5 0.3846154

From the dplyr vignette:

When you group by multiple variables, each summary peels off one level of the grouping. That makes it easy to progressively roll-up a dataset.

Thus, after the summarise, the grouping variable 'gear' is peeled off, and the data is then grouped 'only' by 'am' (just check it with groups on the resulting data), on which we then perform the mutate calculation.

The outcome of the 'peeling' is of course dependent of the order of the grouping variables in the group_by call. We were lucky this time, that it peeled off the desired variable. You may wish to do a subsequent group_by(am), to make your code more explicit.

For rounding and prettification, please refer to the nice answer by @Tyler Rinker.

  • 4
    I just discovered that solution too, but I don't know why sum(n) works over the am group and not the gear group too... – Spacedman Jul 4 '14 at 14:44
  • 5
    See the vignette: "When you group by multiple variables, each summary peels off one level of the grouping." – Henrik Jul 4 '14 at 14:44
  • 5
    Nice - if you just stop after the summarise it does say which groups are left. Oh dplyr rocks... – Spacedman Jul 4 '14 at 14:46

You can use count() function, which has however a different behaviour depending on the version of dplyr:

  • dplyr 0.7.1: returns an ungrouped table: you need to group again by am

  • dplyr < 0.7.1: returns a grouped table, so no need to group again, although you might want to ungroup() for later manipulations

dplyr 0.7.1

mtcars %>%
  count(am, gear) %>%
  group_by(am) %>%
  mutate(freq = n / sum(n))

dplyr < 0.7.1

mtcars %>%
  count(am, gear) %>%
  mutate(freq = n / sum(n))

This results into a grouped table, if you want to use it for further analysis, it might be useful to remove the grouped attribute with ungroup().

  • 1
    This seems an invalid answer on dplyr 0.7.1. It does the frequency calculation overall on "gear", instead of within each level of "am". – Edwin Jul 19 '17 at 14:16
  • 2
    good point, thanks @Edwin !! – Matifou Jul 19 '17 at 21:12

@Henrik's is better for usability as this will make the column character and no longer numeric but matches what you asked for...

mtcars %>%
  group_by (am, gear) %>%
  summarise (n=n()) %>%
  mutate(rel.freq = paste0(round(100 * n/sum(n), 0), "%"))

##   am gear  n rel.freq
## 1  0    3 15      79%
## 2  0    4  4      21%
## 3  1    4  8      62%
## 4  1    5  5      38%

EDIT Because Spacedman asked for it :-)

as.rel_freq <- function(x, rel_freq_col = "rel.freq", ...) {
    class(x) <- c("rel_freq", class(x))
    attributes(x)[["rel_freq_col"]] <- rel_freq_col
    x
}

print.rel_freq <- function(x, ...) {
    freq_col <- attributes(x)[["rel_freq_col"]]
    x[[freq_col]] <- paste0(round(100 * x[[freq_col]], 0), "%")   
    class(x) <- class(x)[!class(x)%in% "rel_freq"]
    print(x)
}

mtcars %>%
  group_by (am, gear) %>%
  summarise (n=n()) %>%
  mutate(rel.freq = n/sum(n)) %>%
  as.rel_freq()

## Source: local data frame [4 x 4]
## Groups: am
## 
##   am gear  n rel.freq
## 1  0    3 15      79%
## 2  0    4  4      21%
## 3  1    4  8      62%
## 4  1    5  5      38%
  • 5
    You could always create an S3 "percentage" class with a format method that adds a percent sign... #overkill – Spacedman Jul 4 '14 at 14:49
  • Implementing this might be interesting too: stackoverflow.com/questions/13483430/… – Spacedman Jul 4 '14 at 15:13
  • What if one would calculate the mean, sd and SE as well in this example? – user3655531 Jan 16 '17 at 12:34

Here is a general function implementing Henrik's solution on dplyr 0.7.1.

freq_table <- function(x, 
                       group_var, 
                       prop_var) {
  group_var <- enquo(group_var)
  prop_var  <- enquo(prop_var)
  x %>% 
    group_by(!!group_var, !!prop_var) %>% 
    summarise(n = n()) %>% 
    mutate(freq = n /sum(n)) %>% 
    ungroup
}
  • Error in bind_rows_(x, .id) : Column am` can't be converted from numeric to character` – f0nzie Aug 6 at 23:41

This answer is based upon Matifou's answer.

First I modified it to ensure that I don't get the freq column returned as a scientific notation column by using the scipen option.

Then I multiple the answer by 100 to get a percent rather than decimal to make the freq column easier to read as a percentage.

getOption("scipen") 
options("scipen"=10) 
mtcars %>%
count(am, gear) %>% 
mutate(freq = (n / sum(n)) * 100)

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