4

What are the pros and cons of using one or the other iteration functions ?

function (int n) {
    for (int i = 1; i != n; ++i) { ... }
}

vs

function (int n) {
    for (int i = 1; i < n; i++) { ... }
}
  • 2
    If you don’t change i in the loop and 1 < n, there’s no difference. If you do by accident, i != n might make a more obvious error (infinite loop vs. slightly incorrect behaviour). If you do it on purpose (parsers that look ahead and such) i < n might make more sense. i < n is more common and easier to recognize. So… subjective! Judging by those, though, I’d say i < n is most appropriate most of the time. Languages that use for in for the typical case of this (like Python) are even better =) – Ry- Jul 4 '14 at 23:01
  • Might be a case for a language with a skip 5 statement or something! – Ry- Jul 4 '14 at 23:05
5

I think the main argument against the first version is that it is a much less common idiom.

Remembering that code is read more often than it is written, it does not make sense to use a less familiar form of for loop if there isn't a very clear advantage to doing so. All it achieves is distracting anyone working on the code in future.

So primarily for code maintenance reasons (by others as well as the original coder) I would favour the more common second format.

| improve this answer | |
  • Since this is a language-agnostic question, I'll bite: whether it's a common idiom or not depends on language. In C++, using != is a much more common idiom, because C++ uses a concept of iterators, where for many iterator classes, the < operator isn't defined. (For such iterators, only ++ is defined, not +=, so the "skip too many elements" argument mentioned in the other answers doesn't apply.) – Chris Jester-Young Jul 12 '14 at 22:03
1

The version with < will work correctly if n is less than 1. The version with != will go into an infinite loop (well, probably not infinite, as integer variables wrap around in most languages).

Using < also generalizes better. E.g.

for (i = start; i < end; i += increment)

This will work even if end - start is not a multiple of increment.

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1

The first one is quite dangerous and could cause an infinite loop.

  • If n is ever less than 1, the loop will never exit.
  • Also if something changes i inside the loop, so that it skips the value of n, then again the loop will never exit.

Edit: OK to be more precise when I say never exit, it will ultimately exit one way or another, but it won't be in the manner most sane developers expect. I can just imagine the look on the poor guy that debugs your code that calls the database 2 billion times.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    If something changes the iterator, it's arguably better to fail hard (infinite loop) than to introduce a silent bug. – JJJ Jul 4 '14 at 23:03
  • 1
    If something changes i inside the loop in either version is dangerous for both loops. That depends if you want to silence or lock it :D Also, i = 1 inside will lock both. – Bart Calixto Jul 4 '14 at 23:04
  • The first statement is generally wrong (unless you change n inside the loop). The loop will exit, as i may become negative at some point and may eventually wrap around back to 1. So it has to reach n regardless of the value of n. – barak manos Jul 4 '14 at 23:12
  • 2
    @barakmanos: That’s not the case in a significant number of languages. For example: in JavaScript, it will just decompose into a floating-point number; in Python, Ruby, and Haskell (assuming Integer), it will keep getting bigger (and never lose precision or reach Infinity until you run out of memory, which won’t happen because addition becomes O(n)); in VB.NET, it will throw an error upon overflowing its type. PHP and Perl won’t do it either, but I’m not sure whether it’s arbitrary precision or a float (in Perl – PHP is definitely the latter). – Ry- Jul 4 '14 at 23:15
  • 1
    @Bart, Well, yeah. Also won't be an infinite loop if you switch off your PC. The point mc110 made is relevant here too: no (decent) programmer would rely on the fact that the loop will be called 4 million times and then overflow/error to exit the loop. That would be craziness. – demoncodemonkey Jul 5 '14 at 6:09

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