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I want to design a class PrimitiveType which serves as an abstract class for mathematical entities such as scalar, vector, tensor, and so on to store them in a std::vector<PrimitiveType *> myVector through which I can iterate. For example, having two of these vectors of identical size, say myVector1 and myVector2, I want to be able to do something like

for (size_t i = 0; i < myVector1.size(); i++)
     myVector1[i] += myVector2[i];

and don't want to care whether I'm adding scalars, vectors, or tensors. Up to now, I came up with

#include <algorithm>
#include <cstddef>
#include <iostream>

template<class T> class Scalar;

template<class T>
class PrimitiveType
{ 
    protected:
        size_t size_;
        T *value_;

    public:
        virtual ~PrimitiveType() = 0;
        PrimitiveType & operator+=(const PrimitiveType &primitiveType) 
        {
            for (size_t i = 0; i < size_; i++)
                value_[i] += primitiveType.value_[i]; 
            return *this;
        }
};

template<class T> PrimitiveType<T>::~PrimitiveType() {};

template<class T>
class Scalar : public PrimitiveType<T>
{
    using PrimitiveType<T>::size_;
    using PrimitiveType<T>::value_;

    public:
        Scalar(T value = 0.0) 
        { 
            size_ = 1; 
            value_ = new T(value); 
        }
        ~Scalar() { delete value_; }
        operator T &() { return *value_; }
};

template<class T>
class Vector : public PrimitiveType<T>
{
    using PrimitiveType<T>::size_;
    using PrimitiveType<T>::value_;

    public:
        Vector(T value = 0.0) 
        { 
            size_ = 3; 
            value_ = new T[size_]; 
            std::fill(value_, size_, value); 
        }
        ~Vector() { delete[] value_; }
        T & operator()(size_t index) { return value_[index]; }
};

int main()
{   
    Scalar<double> s(3.2);
    std::cout << s << std::endl;

    static const size_t size = 3;

    std::vector<PrimitiveType<double> *> p = std::vector<PrimitiveType<double> *>(size);
    for (size_t i = 0; i < size; i++)
    {
        p[i] = new Scalar<double>();
        *(p[i]) += s;
        std::cout << *static_cast<Scalar<double> *>(p[i]) << std::endl;
    }
}

but I don't think this is a very clean solution. In particular,

1) I would like to be able to use initializer lists in the child classes but get problems with dependent name lookup, e.g.

error: ‘using PrimitiveType::size_’ is not a non-static data member of ‘Scalar’

How to realize something like Scalar(T value = 0.0) : size_(1) , value_(new T(value)) {}?

2) I would actually prefer to make value_ a static array because I know at compile time what size value_ has for Scalar, Vector, ... Of course, this does not hold for PrimitiveType, however, an instance of PrimitiveType gets never created.

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  • 1
    This looks like an extremely complicated solution, and I'm not sure I understand its purpose. Shouldn't addition be a completely different operation depending on the type of both operands? I honestly don't believe that OOP is a good choice here; I cannot imagine a useful abstract operation which does not care whether it deals with a vector or a scalar. At any rate, mixing OOP and operator overloading (plus templatising it as well!) is often a good indicator that the program design should be reconsidered. – Christian Hackl Jul 5 '14 at 11:36
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    First Rule of Inheritance: don't do it. Second Rule of Inheritance (experts only): don't do it yet. – TemplateRex Jul 5 '14 at 11:42
  • This doesn't really work. You can't, for example, multiply two arbitrary matrices. – Puppy Jul 5 '14 at 12:14
  • @ChristianHackl Invoking the operator+= of course only makes sense if the type of the argument matches the type of the object on which the method is called. It doesn't make any sense to call operator+= on a second-order tensor and pass a first-order tensor (= vector). Not only does it make no sense but the function may also yield a segmentation fault (or show other non-intended behavior) because an entry which does not exist is accessed. But I think it can be ok to make it the caller's duty to make sure to pass the correct arguments. – Marcel Jul 11 '14 at 18:18
  • @Puppy It is not intended to multiply arbitrarily-shaped matrices but only tensors which are fixed in size, i.e. scalars (1 component), vectors (3 components), second-order tensors (9 components, if non-symmetric), and so on. – Marcel Jul 11 '14 at 18:20
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Edit: Complete edit because other solution was not ok.

Well, the simplest way for your problem would be to move the storage from the main class to the base class and provide accessor of element:

template <class C>
class PrimitiveType {
public:
    PrimitiveType & operator+=(const PrimitiveType &primitiveType) {
        if (this->_size() != primitiveType._size()) {
            throw "Incompatible type." ;
        }
        for (size_t i = 0 ; i < this->_size() ; ++i) {
            this->_get(i) += primitiveType._get(i) ;
        }
        return *this ;
    }
protected:
    virtual C& _get (size_t) = 0 ;
    virtual C _get(size_t) const = 0 ;
    virtual size_t _size () const = 0 ;
};

Then in Scalar and Vector for example:

template <class C>
class Scalar : PrimitiveType <C> {
    C _value ;
public:
    Scalar (C const& c) : _value(c) { }
protected:
    virtual C& _get (size_t) = 0 { return _value ; }
    virtual C _get(size_t) const = 0 { return _value ; }
    virtual size_t _size () const = 0 { return 1 ; }
};

template <class C, int N = 3>
class Vector : PrimitiveType <C> {
    std::array <C, N> _values ;
public:
    Scalar (std::initializer_list <C> l) : _values(l) { }
protected:
    virtual C& _get (size_t i) = 0 { return _values(i) ; }
    virtual C _get(size_t i) const = 0 { return _values(i) ; }
    virtual size_t _size () const = 0 { return _values.size() ; }
};

End of edit.

For your first question, just add a protected constructor in PrimitiveType and call it from your child class:

class PrimitiveType {
protected:
    PrimitiveType (/* */) : _values(/* */), /* ... */ { }
};

class Scalar {
public:
    Scalar (/* */) : PrimitiveType(/* */) { }
}

For your second questions, add a storage type as second argument templates of primitive type:

template <class C, class S = std::vector <C>>
class PrimitiveType { /* */ }

template <class C>
class Scalar : public PrimitiveType <C, std::array <C, 1>> { /* */ }

Detailled example:

template <class C, class S = std::vector <C>>
class PrimitiveType {
public:
    PrimitiveType & operator+=(const PrimitiveType &primitiveType) {
        /** Same code as yours. **/
    }

protected:
    S _values ;
    PrimitiveType (std::initializer_list <C> l) : _values(l) { }
};

template <class C>
class Scalar : public PrimitiveType <C, std::array <C, 1>> {
public:
    Scalar (C const& c) : PrimitiveType({c}) { }
};
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  • They won't be able to have a std::vector with pointers to a mix of Scalars, Vectors, and Tensors, will they? The base class for each will be different. – Joseph Mansfield Jul 5 '14 at 11:44
  • @JosephMansfield if the vector is of type PrimitiveType it would work – Nathan Wride Jul 5 '14 at 11:50
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    @NathanWride No because you have multiple PrimitiveType with different template instanciation. – Holt Jul 5 '14 at 11:51
  • @Holt Sorry I see now – Nathan Wride Jul 5 '14 at 11:52
  • @JosephMansfield I added a big edit to my post, should be ok now, thx for you comment. – Holt Jul 5 '14 at 11:57

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