I'd like to write the code like this:

def boundary do
  :crypto.rand_bytes(8)
  |> Base.encode16
  |> &("--------FormDataBoundary" <> &1)
end

But it doesn't work.

up vote 63 down vote accepted

It will look bit weird but must work:

def boundary do
  :crypto.rand_bytes(8)
  |> Base.encode16
  |> (&("--------FormDataBoundary" <> &1)).()
end
  • This can resolve my problem. – ruisin Jul 8 '14 at 6:38
  • 3
    is there any reason for it to be so weird? When I pass a function to a pipe I treat it more like a variable (yes, I'm from Javascript), but doing (fn).() looks like I'm immediately invoking it which I am not. – leitasat Apr 8 '16 at 10:16
  • @leitasat See stackoverflow.com/a/18023790/4376 – Nathan Long Sep 14 '16 at 9:38
  • 1
    (&("--------FormDataBoundary" <> &1)).() It looks like you define an anonymous function that takes 1 argument, then call it with zero arguments, and then it's part of the pipeline? I don't understand why you need the .() at the end. Isn't this calling the anonymous function? I don't want to call it myself, I want it to be part of the pipeline. – Buttons840 Apr 5 '17 at 22:54
  • I think I get it now. The fact that the function is part of a pipeline means that the pipeline supplies the first argument. All that is left is for the function to be called, which you do with the .(). – Buttons840 Apr 5 '17 at 23:01

Related: if the "anonymous" function has been assigned to a variable, you can pipe to it like this:

def boundary do
  add_marker = fn (s) ->
    "--------FormDataBoundary" <> s
  end

  :crypto.rand_bytes(8)
  |> Base.encode16
  |> add_marker.()
end

The accepted answer works, but you can do this a bit more elegantly by using

(&"--------FormDataBoundary#{&1}").()

instead of

(&("--------FormDataBoundary" <> &1)).()

Here is the full function:

def boundary do
  :crypto.strong_rand_bytes(8)
  |> Base.encode16()
  |> (&"--------FormDataBoundary#{&1}").()
end

Bonus: I've also replaced :crypto.rand_bytes/1 (which doesn't exist in elixir 1.6+) with :crypto.strong_rand_bytes/1.

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