Inspired by this question on mathoverflow

Suppose I have a n x n multiplication table, what is the number of distinct values on it?

For example, a 3X3 multiplication table

1 2 3
2 4 6
3 6 9

has 6 unique values namely [1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9]

So far I only have a O(n2) solution

 public static void findDistinctNumbers(int n) {

    Set<Integer> unique = new HashSet<>();

    for(int i=1; i<=n; i++) {
        for(int j=1; j<=n; j++) {
            unique.add(i*j);
        }
    }
    System.out.println("number of unique values: " + unique.size());
  }

Is there a better approach which is less than O(n2) ?

  • 6
    Well, if you work out i * j you certainly don't need to work out j * i - that it still O(n^2) but is half the work. – Boris the Spider Jul 7 '14 at 15:59
  • 2
    I think this is the best you can do without delving into number theory; I don't see a better way to do this in Java or any other language. Based on that, I think this should be closed this as not being a question about programming, but as a math question it's definitely interesting. – ajb Jul 7 '14 at 16:02
  • 5
    If there were a formula for π(x), the prime counting function, it could be solved in O(1). ;-) – laune Jul 7 '14 at 16:05
  • 2
    @user1990169 Even in the 3x3 example we have 8, which is beteen n and n^2 but neither a prime nor part of the solution. – biziclop Jul 7 '14 at 17:03
  • 4
    @tucuxi: The point that you're not getting and that others have tried to explain is that in the OP's example, n is 3. So his method is O(n^2). The Sieve, as you've pointed out, is O(n log log n), where n is the number of items you're running it against. In this case, you have to run it against 9 items. So the Sieve is O(n^2 log(log(n^2))), where n == 3. – Jim Mischel Jul 8 '14 at 2:48
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The problem is that to use a set to verify the uniqueness, you have to populate it first, and it's O(n^2), one way or another; without a set, you can't easily verify if a number is unique or not...

As a side note: since big-O class is somewhat broad (i.e. it can describe any complexity not higher than something, but not necessarily not lower, ie. both linear complexity and quadratic complexity algorithms can be described as O(n^2), since, in both cases, the complexity is not higher than n^2) - as such, assume that every O(x) in this answer means "Big Theta", ie. asymptotical up/down boundary, such that f(n) is in O(g(n)) means that k1*g(n)<=f(n)<=k2*g(n) (k1,k2 positive of course).

As https://mathoverflow.net/questions/108912/number-of-elements-in-the-set-1-cdots-n-times-1-cdots-n?lq=1 points out, the exact amount is asymptotically approaching a well-known value; even so, the exact value for any given n is not something that can be calculated simply, as, in essence, it's quite similar to solving http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prime-counting_function -

that said, let's try to summarize the facts, "(why?)" marking the fields I'm too lazy/tired to explain ATM, but which an interested reader may verify (or disprove) himself:

a) no well-known formula to get the result by a simple function a(n) currently exists,

b) because of that, we are required to generate a set with all of the unique numbers and return the cardinality of that set as the result,

c) since the amount of actual numbers in the set is proven to be o(n^2) (see the reference), strictly speaking o(n^2/(log n)^c * (loglog n)^3/2), generating the set would take at least that much operations - that's our low bound - assuming we already know if a number is in the set or not,

d) as such, complexity C of our algorithm A can be though, at best, to be such that

O(n^2) > O(C) > O(n^2/(log n)^c * (loglog n)^3/2) (please note that this represents only minuscule improvement over pure n^2).

That said, my proposition for A goes as follows:

a) since the matrix is symmetric vs the diagonal, assume we're analysing only e.g. upper right triangle plus diagonal

b) assume that, for your n, any number x =< n is in the set

c) calculate y=int(sqrt(n)) - every diagonal value of row r <= y is already present in the set, every diagonal value of row r > y has to be checked

c') n*(n+1)/2-n-int(sqrt(n)) elements need to be processed (added to set) in the "conventional" method

d) now, since we ruled out all the values that can be predicted easily, we enter the main loop: for (row r < n) // max number is r * n all x : x > (r-1) * n are guaranteed to be unique till now, so they needn't be processed, assuming we wouldn't have to maintain unique numbers set!; since the row's set is for numbers (r^2;r*n), all numbers in range ((r-1)n,rn) in row r are in range now, since the actual set of numbers in row r is a_n = r, 2*r, 3*r ... nr, the obvious problem is to find a "border" integer yr such that y*r > (r-1)*n, because that would mean that we have n-y guaranteed uniques. nb if we find an exact value of ((r-1)*n)/r to be an integer, we can safely assume that y = ((r-1)*n)/r + 1 (why?), and that exact integer is not unique. because of this, there is exactly max(n-r,ceil(n/r)) guaranteed uniques in every row (why?); we get this in O(1) for every row

e) the trickiest part: we've got some number >= than r*r, but obviously smaller than (r-1)n; that is the "hard range", [rr, (r-1)*n) , in which the number can be or not be unique; we can have at most i_r = max(0,n-r-floor(n/r)) numbers to check this range (why?) even naive checking every number in this range is obviously faster than O(n) (why? -floor(n/r) factor grows with respect to n !)

we already got better than O(n^2) - we have sum(i_r) iterations, for r = 2..n (first row is no-op), so this is actually equal to sum for r=2..n(max(0,n-r-floor(n/r))) - I won't provide an exact complexity class result here, as it's not a pretty number, Let's try to go even further...

f) What about a catapult?

g) For odd rows, we can't do much more (since this would, amongst many things, require us to solve some prime-related problems, already mentioned in the comments, which hasn't been solved for world's best matematicians yet) - yet we still can help ourselves for every even r!

divide r by two. every number that is <= r/2 * n has already been processed! it's either unique or not, we don't have to care!.

Note that since we actually dropped the ends of the rows already (and most of the beginnings too), this works surprisingly good. Since we do this check only on even rows, we just start checking them (adding to set) not from x = r*(r+1), but from r/2*n+r instead!

h) but now, the most important thing: how to check them if we don't have a set of already found uniques defined? sadly, this is the main problem with any algorithm that tries to go below ~n*n/2 element iterations - since you don't process all values, how can you know if the value has been processed or not?

i) if there was an easy way to predict how many (eg. %) of the "potentially unique" numbers are really unique, there won't be any real problem here, it would be a O(n) problem - but I simply consider it impossible, due to above difficulties.


tl;dr - I call shenanigans on any answer trying to do it strictly below O(n^2) - you can drop a few bits below, but the complexity class won't get reduced anyway.

  • If you need to iterate n², then there is obviously no way to go below n². I've been trying to find an incremental answer, but oeis.org/A108407 is hard to crack. – tucuxi Jul 8 '14 at 10:09
  • 4
    My god. If anyone actually solve this, he/she better be writing a paper than a SO answer. – Billiska Jul 8 '14 at 14:38
  • The problem is not similar to counting the primes, it is exactly the same as counting the primes. The answer is n^2 minus the number of primes between n and n^2, since every number between n and n^2 must be either divisible by a number between 2 and n or it must be prime. – Mark Ransom Jul 8 '14 at 22:41
  • @MarkRansom no mark, that's wrong. I actually made a failed attempt based on that 'minus things divisible by primes between n and n^2'. There is a simple counter example: in the n=3 case, 8 is not in the multiplication table and also not divisible by any prime between 3 and 9. Another example to convince you: take n=9, then 75 is also not divisible by any primes between 9 and 81. – Billiska Jul 8 '14 at 23:07
  • @Billiska no I said "between 2 and n". 8 is divisible by 2 and 75 is divisible by 5. That part of the statement wasn't part of the formula, it was the justification for the formula. To say the formula another way, the answer is all of the numbers 1 through n plus all of the non-primes n+1 through n^2. – Mark Ransom Jul 9 '14 at 2:40

I am convinced that there is a better-than O(n²) solution. I have not been able to find it, but I believe I am on the right path, just a few mathematical insights away.

This is my algorithm-under-development:

public static int numberOfDistinctResults(int n) {
    if (n == 1) {
        return 1;
    }

    // runs a prime-number sieve in O(n log log n)
    Factorization.initialize(n); 
    int total = 1;
    for (int i = 2; i <= n; i++) {
        total += i;
        // divs[i] == 0 iff i is prime, or the lowest prime that divides i
        if (Factorization.divs[i] == 0) {
            // i is prime; for all j<=i, j*i is brand new; nothing to substract
        } else {
            // i is non-prime; discard already-seen decompositions
            total -= magic(n); // <--- this part needs work
        }
    }
    return total;
}

Currently, this runs in under O(n²) as long as magic(n) can run in under O(n). However, I have been unable to find such a magic function. Essentially, I am adding terms from oeis.org/A062854 -- there appears to be a lot of structure in that graph.

See oeis.org/A027424 for a lot of background on the whole question (all the algorithms listed seem to be O(n²), though), and oeis.org/A108407 for a list of values for magic(n) and several related sequences. A small table of values follows, where you can see that primes are easy (0 to substract), but non-primes are hard (no immediately apparent relation to factorization or existing factors):

f(1) = 1 ( prev + 1 = 1 - 0)
f(2) = 3 ( prev + 2 = 2 - 0)
f(3) = 6 ( prev + 3 = 3 - 0)
f(4) = 9 ( prev + 3 = 4 - 1)
    4 = 2^2; available = 2·3
f(5) = 14 ( prev + 5 = 5 - 0)
f(6) = 18 ( prev + 4 = 6 - 2)
    6 = 2·3; available = 2^2·3·5
f(7) = 25 ( prev + 7 = 7 - 0)
f(8) = 30 ( prev + 5 = 8 - 3)
    8 = 2^3; available = 2^2·3·5·7
f(9) = 36 ( prev + 6 = 9 - 3)
    9 = 3^2; available = 2^3·3·5·7
f(10) = 42 ( prev + 6 = 10 - 4)
    10 = 2·5; available = 2^3·3^2·5·7
f(11) = 53 ( prev + 11 = 11 - 0)
f(12) = 59 ( prev + 6 = 12 - 6)
    12 = 2^2·3; available = 2^3·3^2·5·7·11
f(13) = 72 ( prev + 13 = 13 - 0)
f(14) = 80 ( prev + 8 = 14 - 6)
    14 = 2·7; available = 2^3·3^2·5·7·11·13
f(15) = 89 ( prev + 9 = 15 - 6)
    15 = 3·5; available = 2^3·3^2·5·7·11·13
f(16) = 97 ( prev + 8 = 16 - 8)
    16 = 2^4; available = 2^3·3^2·5·7·11·13
f(17) = 114 ( prev + 17 = 17 - 0)
f(18) = 123 ( prev + 9 = 18 - 9)
    18 = 2·3^2; available = 2^4·3^2·5·7·11·13·17
f(19) = 142 ( prev + 19 = 19 - 0)
f(20) = 152 ( prev + 10 = 20 - 10)
    20 = 2^2·5; available = 2^4·3^2·5·7·11·13·17·19
f(21) = 164 ( prev + 12 = 21 - 9)
    21 = 3·7; available = 2^4·3^2·5·7·11·13·17·19
f(22) = 176 ( prev + 12 = 22 - 10)
    22 = 2·11; available = 2^4·3^2·5·7·11·13·17·19
f(23) = 199 ( prev + 23 = 23 - 0)
f(24) = 209 ( prev + 10 = 24 - 14)
    24 = 2^3·3; available = 2^4·3^2·5·7·11·13·17·19·23
f(25) = 225 ( prev + 16 = 25 - 9)
    25 = 5^2; available = 2^4·3^2·5·7·11·13·17·19·23
f(26) = 239 ( prev + 14 = 26 - 12)
    26 = 2·13; available = 2^4·3^2·5^2·7·11·13·17·19·23
f(27) = 254 ( prev + 15 = 27 - 12)
    27 = 3^3; available = 2^4·3^2·5^2·7·11·13·17·19·23
f(28) = 267 ( prev + 13 = 28 - 15)
    28 = 2^2·7; available = 2^4·3^3·5^2·7·11·13·17·19·23
f(29) = 296 ( prev + 29 = 29 - 0)
f(30) = 308 ( prev + 12 = 30 - 18)
    30 = 2·3·5; available = 2^4·3^3·5^2·7·11·13·17·19·23·29
f(31) = 339 ( prev + 31 = 31 - 0)
f(32) = 354 ( prev + 15 = 32 - 17)
    32 = 2^5; available = 2^4·3^3·5^2·7·11·13·17·19·23·29·31
f(33) = 372 ( prev + 18 = 33 - 15)
    33 = 3·11; available = 2^5·3^3·5^2·7·11·13·17·19·23·29·31
f(34) = 390 ( prev + 18 = 34 - 16)
    34 = 2·17; available = 2^5·3^3·5^2·7·11·13·17·19·23·29·31
f(35) = 410 ( prev + 20 = 35 - 15)
    35 = 5·7; available = 2^5·3^3·5^2·7·11·13·17·19·23·29·31
f(36) = 423 ( prev + 13 = 36 - 23)
    36 = 2^2·3^2; available = 2^5·3^3·5^2·7·11·13·17·19·23·29·31
f(37) = 460 ( prev + 37 = 37 - 0)
f(38) = 480 ( prev + 20 = 38 - 18)
    38 = 2·19; available = 2^5·3^3·5^2·7·11·13·17·19·23·29·31·37
f(39) = 501 ( prev + 21 = 39 - 18)
    39 = 3·13; available = 2^5·3^3·5^2·7·11·13·17·19·23·29·31·37
  • 2
    although I like the very idea you proposed, finding this magic(n) would essentially mean you either disproved or solved the problem defined by Erdos, Kevin Ford and Dimitris Koukoulopoulos ... see arxiv.org/abs/math/0401223, arxiv.org/abs/0809.1072 and arxiv.org/abs/1102.3236 - I'm not saying with perfect confidence that you can't do that, but, until you do and thus are able to actually solve the problem instead of being convinced of being able to solve the problem, I'm inclined to downvote. – vaxquis Jul 9 '14 at 18:24
  • I am not convinced that I can solve it, but I am convinced that magic(n) is computable in under O(n), with any suitable pre-computed intermediate results available (two very different things). Please indicate which theorem in the above papers contradicts these italics - I have found none. You are, of course, free to downvote as your inclinations tell you. My answer may not be a true answer -- but none of them currently are: some are wrong, and none is conclusive proof in any direction. – tucuxi Jul 9 '14 at 21:44
  • I written explicitly or solved - if you're able to solve the problem of your "magic(n)", you'll essentially solve the problems described in those papers in a better and more streamlined way. Your beliefs are only that, beliefs. You believe you're right, I believe you're wrong. Without proof, your making a religion out of science. The burden of proof is on the one proposing a new solution or disproving existing ones, not otherwise. Your answer is not a true answer (no "may" here), as it only describes your convictions, not solutions. – vaxquis Jul 10 '14 at 23:21
  • @vaxquis vaxquis, by your own definition, your answer is not a "true answer." You present only your convictions and provide no mathematical proof that a solution in under n^2 could not be created. Instead, you offer your own proposition for A(n) and try to deduce from your own algorithm's difficulties that no other solution could exist. – גלעד ברקן Jul 13 '14 at 13:23
  • the only way to actually determine the computational complexity of a problem is to solve it. I have given, as first person in this thread, an actual attempt to find a way if a number is within the set or not, without actually generating the set. Also, I have provided a rationale supporting my point. I was the first person to explicitly provide backing reference. Also, I have given the only algorithm that actually got better than simply removing the diagonal. As such, I call shenanigans both on your answer, and on your reasoning given here. – vaxquis Jul 13 '14 at 18:12

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