-1

Is there a way to continue the most outer loop from the most nested one in ABAP?

Example in Java. There is a construct in this language using labels (most people do not know of it anyway) which allows me to continue the most outer loop from the nested one.

public class NestedLoopContinue {
    public static void main(String[] args) {    
        label1: for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j < 2; j++) {
                if (i == 3) {
                    continue label1;
                }
            }
            System.out.println(i + 1);
        }
    }
}

This outputs

1
2
3
5

Now, how can I do it in ABAP in a smart way? One solution would be to use TRY. ENDTRY. block but it is rather a hacking one. Any other ideas?

DATA: l_outer_counter TYPE i.
DO 5 TIMES.
  l_outer_counter = sy-index.
  TRY.
    DO 2 TIMES.
      IF l_outer_counter = 4.
        RAISE EXCEPTION TYPE cx_abap_random.
      ENDIF.
    ENDDO.
    WRITE / l_outer_counter.
    CATCH cx_abap_random.
      CONTINUE.
  ENDTRY.
ENDDO.

Or maybe there is a way to tell whether the DO. ENDO. ended with an EXIT statement (without introducing an own variable of course, like SYST global variable)?

DATA: l_outer_counter TYPE i.
DO 5 TIMES.
  l_outer_counter = sy-index.
  DO 2 TIMES.
    IF l_outer_counter = 4.
      EXIT.
    ENDIF.
  ENDDO.
  IF sy-last_loop_ended_with_exit = abap_true. "???
    CONTINUE.
  ENDIF.
  WRITE / l_outer_counter.
ENDDO.
6
  • Just out of curiosity - what would be the practical application of this? – vwegert Jul 7 '14 at 21:10
  • @vwegert Yes, there is a practical application. In fact I use LOOP AT. The outer loop I have contains objects, the inner one contains the references to implementations of the same interface which method I call with the identifiers obtained from the outer loop. Based on the result of a method call I want to proceed to the next outer loop object or continue normally with the rest of the inner loop and what is before the outer ENDLOOP. – Jagger Jul 7 '14 at 22:02
  • 1
    I'm not sure I understand the application, but you might want to take a look at meshes (help.sap.com/abapdocu_740/en/abaptypes_mesh.htm) - they were added recently... – vwegert Jul 8 '14 at 10:25
  • 4
    Can someone comment on why this question is getting downvoted? – robjohncox Jul 10 '14 at 11:24
  • 10
    @robjohncox: guess this is the meta effect. – Josien Jul 11 '14 at 5:55
4

When working with nested loops, I often find the best way to improve readability, and avoid using more unusual approaches (such as breaking to a label, which is not only controversial because of its goto-like nature, but also reduces readability because a lot of people are not familiar with them) is to extract the inner loop into a separate function. I do not know how this is done in ABAP, but the refactored Java equivalent would be:

public class NestedLoopContinue {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
            NestedLoopContinue.innerLoop(i)
        }
    }

    static void innerLoop(int i) {
        for (int j = 0; j < 2; j++) {
            if (i == 3) {
                return;
            }
        }
        System.out.println(i + 1);
    }
}

I would argue that in this example, this actually becomes less readable because it is harder to follow the logic across the two methods. However, if this was a real-world example (where the methods and variables had some actual meanings and appropriate names to go with them), then the result of extracting the inner loop into a separate method would be more readable than using a label.

0
10

I don't know of an ABAP-specific solution, but I've used a general programming solution to handle this before; simply use a boolean and check at the end of the inner loop whether or not to continue.

In Java:

public class NestedLoopContinue
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
        {
            boolean earlyBreak = false;
            for (int j = 0; j < 2; j++)
            {
                if (i == 3)
                {
                    earlyBreak = true;
                    break;
                }
            }
            if (earlyBreak)
            {
               continue;
            }
            System.out.println(i + 1);
        }
    }
}

And in ABAP:

DATA: l_outer_counter type i,
      early_break type FLAG.

DO 5 TIMES.
  l_outer_counter = sy-index.

  DO 2 TIMES.
      IF l_outer_counter = 4.
       early_break = ABAP_TRUE.
       EXIT.
      ENDIF.
  ENDDO.

  IF early_break = ABAP_TRUE.
      CLEAR early_break.
      CONTINUE.
  ENDIF.

  WRITE / l_outer_counter.

ENDDO.

I've read that the reason label-based breaks exist in Java in the first place is because GOTO statements explicitly do not, and the case covered by label-based break was one of the few "good" uses of GOTO that the team wanted to maintain.

In general, though, this is a very awkward construction. Is there no potential way to refactor your code (perhaps swapping the inner-ness of the loops) to remove the need for this in the first place?

0
-1

Based on the robjohncox answer, the ABAP code might look like this.

CLASS lcl_nested_loop_continue DEFINITION FINAL.
  PUBLIC SECTION.
    CLASS-METHODS:
      main.
  PRIVATE SECTION.
    CLASS-METHODS:
      inner_loop
        IMPORTING
          i_index TYPE i.
ENDCLASS.

CLASS lcl_nested_loop_continue IMPLEMENTATION.
  METHOD main.
    DO 5 TIMES.
      lcl_nested_loop_continue=>inner_loop( sy-index ).
    ENDDO.
  ENDMETHOD.

  METHOD inner_loop.
    DO 2 TIMES.
      IF i_index = 4.
        RETURN.
      ENDIF.
    ENDDO.
    WRITE / i_index.
  ENDMETHOD.
ENDCLASS.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.