289

The Java 8 Collectors.toMap throws a NullPointerException if one of the values is 'null'. I don't understand this behaviour, maps can contain null pointers as value without any problems. Is there a good reason why values cannot be null for Collectors.toMap?

Also, is there a nice Java 8 way of fixing this, or should I revert to plain old for loop?

An example of my problem:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.stream.Collectors;


class Answer {
    private int id;

    private Boolean answer;

    Answer() {
    }

    Answer(int id, Boolean answer) {
        this.id = id;
        this.answer = answer;
    }

    public int getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(int id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    public Boolean getAnswer() {
        return answer;
    }

    public void setAnswer(Boolean answer) {
        this.answer = answer;
    }
}

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List<Answer> answerList = new ArrayList<>();

        answerList.add(new Answer(1, true));
        answerList.add(new Answer(2, true));
        answerList.add(new Answer(3, null));

        Map<Integer, Boolean> answerMap =
        answerList
                .stream()
                .collect(Collectors.toMap(Answer::getId, Answer::getAnswer));
    }
}

Stacktrace:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NullPointerException
    at java.util.HashMap.merge(HashMap.java:1216)
    at java.util.stream.Collectors.lambda$toMap$168(Collectors.java:1320)
    at java.util.stream.Collectors$$Lambda$5/1528902577.accept(Unknown Source)
    at java.util.stream.ReduceOps$3ReducingSink.accept(ReduceOps.java:169)
    at java.util.ArrayList$ArrayListSpliterator.forEachRemaining(ArrayList.java:1359)
    at java.util.stream.AbstractPipeline.copyInto(AbstractPipeline.java:512)
    at java.util.stream.AbstractPipeline.wrapAndCopyInto(AbstractPipeline.java:502)
    at java.util.stream.ReduceOps$ReduceOp.evaluateSequential(ReduceOps.java:708)
    at java.util.stream.AbstractPipeline.evaluate(AbstractPipeline.java:234)
    at java.util.stream.ReferencePipeline.collect(ReferencePipeline.java:499)
    at Main.main(Main.java:48)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:62)
    at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:43)
    at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:483)
    at com.intellij.rt.execution.application.AppMain.main(AppMain.java:134)

This problem still exists in Java 11.

  • 5
    null always was a bit problematic, like in TreeMap. Maybe a nice moment to try out Optional<Boolean>? Otherwise split and use filter. – Joop Eggen Jul 8 '14 at 11:58
  • 5
    @JoopEggen null could be a problem for a key, but in this case it's the value. – gontard Jul 8 '14 at 12:13
  • Not all maps have problem with null, HashMap for example can have one null key and any number of null values, you can try creating a custom Collector using a HashMap instead of using the default one. – kajacx Jul 8 '14 at 13:29
  • 2
    @kajacx But the default implementation is HashMap - as shown in the first line of stacktrace. The problem is not that a Map can't hold null value, but that the second argument of Map#merge function can't be null. – czerny May 12 '15 at 21:33
  • Personally, with the given circumstances, I would go with non-stream solution, or forEach() if the input is parallel. The nice short stream based solutions below could have a terrible performance. – Ondra Žižka Nov 30 '18 at 14:08

12 Answers 12

250

You can work around this known bug in OpenJDK with this:

Map<Integer, Boolean> collect = list.stream()
        .collect(HashMap::new, (m,v)->m.put(v.getId(), v.getAnswer()), HashMap::putAll);

It is not that much pretty, but it works. Result:

1: true
2: true
3: null

(this tutorial helped me the most.)

  • 2
    @Jagger yes, a definition of a supplier (the first argument) is a function that passes no parameters and returns a result, thus the lambda for your case would be () -> new TreeMap<>(String.CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER) to create a case insensitive String keyed TreeMap. – Brett Ryan Oct 19 '15 at 12:58
  • 2
    This is the correct answer, and IMHO what the JDK should be doing for its default non-overloaded version instead. Maybe merge is faster, but I have not tested. – Brett Ryan Oct 19 '15 at 12:59
  • 1
    I had to specify the type parameters in order to compile, that way: Map<Integer, Boolean> collect = list.stream().collect(HashMap<Integer, Boolean>::new, (m,v)->m.put(v.getId(), v.getAnswer()), HashMap<Integer, Boolean>::putAll);. I had: incompatible types: cannot infer type-variable(s) R (argument mismatch; invalid method reference no suitable method found for putAll(java.util.Map<java.lang.Integer,java.lang.Boolean>,java.util.Map<java.lang.Integer,java.lang.Boolean>) method java.util.Map.putAll(java.util.Map) is not applicable (actual and formal argument lists differ in length) – Anthony O. Feb 18 '16 at 10:39
  • 1
    This might be quite slow on a large input. You create a HashMap and then call putAll() for every single entry. Personally, at given circumstances, I would go with non-stream solution, or forEach() if the input is parallel. – Ondra Žižka Nov 30 '18 at 14:06
  • 2
    Beware that this solution behaves differently than the original toMap implementation. Original implementation detects duplicate keys and throws an IllegalStatException, but this solution silently accepts the latest key. Emmanuel Touzery's solution (stackoverflow.com/a/32648397/471214) is closer to the original behaviour. – mmdemirbas Aug 8 at 8:35
164

It is not possible with the static methods of Collectors. The javadoc of toMap explains that toMap is based on Map.merge:

@param mergeFunction a merge function, used to resolve collisions between values associated with the same key, as supplied to Map#merge(Object, Object, BiFunction)}

and the javadoc of Map.merge says:

@throws NullPointerException if the specified key is null and this map does not support null keys or the value or remappingFunction is null

You can avoid the for loop by using the forEach method of your list.

Map<Integer,  Boolean> answerMap = new HashMap<>();
answerList.forEach((answer) -> answerMap.put(answer.getId(), answer.getAnswer()));

but it is not really simple than the old way:

Map<Integer, Boolean> answerMap = new HashMap<>();
for (Answer answer : answerList) {
    answerMap.put(answer.getId(), answer.getAnswer());
}
  • 3
    In that case I would rather use the old-fashioned for-each. Should I consider this a bug in toMerge? as the use of this merge function is really an implementation detail, or is the a good reasoning for not allowing toMap to process null values? – Jasper Jul 8 '14 at 12:41
  • 6
    It is specified in the javadoc of merge, but it is not stated in the doc of toMap – Jasper Jul 8 '14 at 14:57
  • 115
    Never thought that null values in map would make such an impact on standard API, I'd rather consider it as a flaw. – Askar Kalykov Apr 15 '15 at 10:44
  • 15
    Actually the API docs don't state anything about the use of Map.merge. This IMHO is a flaw in the implementation that restricts a perfectly acceptable use-case that has been overlooked. The overloaded methods of toMap do state the use of Map.merge but not the one the OP is using. – Brett Ryan Oct 19 '15 at 12:33
  • 11
    @Jasper there is even bug report bugs.openjdk.java.net/browse/JDK-8148463 – pixel Sep 23 '16 at 9:30
22

I wrote a Collector which, unlike the default java one, does not crash when you have null values:

public static <T, K, U>
        Collector<T, ?, Map<K, U>> toMap(Function<? super T, ? extends K> keyMapper,
                Function<? super T, ? extends U> valueMapper) {
    return Collectors.collectingAndThen(
            Collectors.toList(),
            list -> {
                Map<K, U> result = new HashMap<>();
                for (T item : list) {
                    K key = keyMapper.apply(item);
                    if (result.putIfAbsent(key, valueMapper.apply(item)) != null) {
                        throw new IllegalStateException(String.format("Duplicate key %s", key));
                    }
                }
                return result;
            });
}

Just replace your Collectors.toMap() call to a call to this function and it'll fix the problem.

  • But allowing null values and using putIfAbsent does not play well together. It does not detect duplicate keys when they map to null – Holger Aug 8 at 17:23
10

Yep, a late answer from me, but I think it may help to understand what's happening under the hood in case anyone wants to code some other Collector-logic.

I tried to solve the problem by coding a more native and straight forward approach. I think it's as direct as possible:

public class LambdaUtilities {

  /**
   * In contrast to {@link Collectors#toMap(Function, Function)} the result map
   * may have null values.
   */
  public static <T, K, U, M extends Map<K, U>> Collector<T, M, M> toMapWithNullValues(Function<? super T, ? extends K> keyMapper, Function<? super T, ? extends U> valueMapper) {
    return toMapWithNullValues(keyMapper, valueMapper, HashMap::new);
  }

  /**
   * In contrast to {@link Collectors#toMap(Function, Function, BinaryOperator, Supplier)}
   * the result map may have null values.
   */
  public static <T, K, U, M extends Map<K, U>> Collector<T, M, M> toMapWithNullValues(Function<? super T, ? extends K> keyMapper, Function<? super T, ? extends U> valueMapper, Supplier<Map<K, U>> supplier) {
    return new Collector<T, M, M>() {

      @Override
      public Supplier<M> supplier() {
        return () -> {
          @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
          M map = (M) supplier.get();
          return map;
        };
      }

      @Override
      public BiConsumer<M, T> accumulator() {
        return (map, element) -> {
          K key = keyMapper.apply(element);
          if (map.containsKey(key)) {
            throw new IllegalStateException("Duplicate key " + key);
          }
          map.put(key, valueMapper.apply(element));
        };
      }

      @Override
      public BinaryOperator<M> combiner() {
        return (left, right) -> {
          int total = left.size() + right.size();
          left.putAll(right);
          if (left.size() < total) {
            throw new IllegalStateException("Duplicate key(s)");
          }
          return left;
        };
      }

      @Override
      public Function<M, M> finisher() {
        return Function.identity();
      }

      @Override
      public Set<Collector.Characteristics> characteristics() {
        return Collections.unmodifiableSet(EnumSet.of(Collector.Characteristics.IDENTITY_FINISH));
      }

    };
  }

}

And the tests using JUnit and assertj:

  @Test
  public void testToMapWithNullValues() throws Exception {
    Map<Integer, Integer> result = Stream.of(1, 2, 3)
        .collect(LambdaUtilities.toMapWithNullValues(Function.identity(), x -> x % 2 == 1 ? x : null));

    assertThat(result)
        .isExactlyInstanceOf(HashMap.class)
        .hasSize(3)
        .containsEntry(1, 1)
        .containsEntry(2, null)
        .containsEntry(3, 3);
  }

  @Test
  public void testToMapWithNullValuesWithSupplier() throws Exception {
    Map<Integer, Integer> result = Stream.of(1, 2, 3)
        .collect(LambdaUtilities.toMapWithNullValues(Function.identity(), x -> x % 2 == 1 ? x : null, LinkedHashMap::new));

    assertThat(result)
        .isExactlyInstanceOf(LinkedHashMap.class)
        .hasSize(3)
        .containsEntry(1, 1)
        .containsEntry(2, null)
        .containsEntry(3, 3);
  }

  @Test
  public void testToMapWithNullValuesDuplicate() throws Exception {
    assertThatThrownBy(() -> Stream.of(1, 2, 3, 1)
        .collect(LambdaUtilities.toMapWithNullValues(Function.identity(), x -> x % 2 == 1 ? x : null)))
            .isExactlyInstanceOf(IllegalStateException.class)
            .hasMessage("Duplicate key 1");
  }

  @Test
  public void testToMapWithNullValuesParallel() throws Exception {
    Map<Integer, Integer> result = Stream.of(1, 2, 3)
        .parallel() // this causes .combiner() to be called
        .collect(LambdaUtilities.toMapWithNullValues(Function.identity(), x -> x % 2 == 1 ? x : null));

    assertThat(result)
        .isExactlyInstanceOf(HashMap.class)
        .hasSize(3)
        .containsEntry(1, 1)
        .containsEntry(2, null)
        .containsEntry(3, 3);
  }

  @Test
  public void testToMapWithNullValuesParallelWithDuplicates() throws Exception {
    assertThatThrownBy(() -> Stream.of(1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3)
        .parallel() // this causes .combiner() to be called
        .collect(LambdaUtilities.toMapWithNullValues(Function.identity(), x -> x % 2 == 1 ? x : null)))
            .isExactlyInstanceOf(IllegalStateException.class)
            .hasCauseExactlyInstanceOf(IllegalStateException.class)
            .hasStackTraceContaining("Duplicate key");
  }

And how do you use it? Well, just use it instead of toMap() like the tests show. This makes the calling code look as clean as possible.

EDIT:
implemented Holger's idea below, added a test method

  • 1
    The combiner does not check for duplicate keys. If you want to avoid to check for every key, you can use something like (map1, map2) -> { int total = map1.size() + map2.size(); map1.putAll(map2); if(map1.size() < total.size()) throw new IllegalStateException("Duplicate key(s)"); return map1; } – Holger Jul 22 at 15:25
  • @Holger Yep, that's true. Especially since accumulator() actually does check that. Maybe I should do some parallel streams once :) – sjngm Jul 23 at 15:39
5

Here's somewhat simpler collector than proposed by @EmmanuelTouzery. Use it if you like:

public static <T, K, U> Collector<T, ?, Map<K, U>> toMapNullFriendly(
        Function<? super T, ? extends K> keyMapper,
        Function<? super T, ? extends U> valueMapper) {
    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    U none = (U) new Object();
    return Collectors.collectingAndThen(
            Collectors.<T, K, U> toMap(keyMapper,
                    valueMapper.andThen(v -> v == null ? none : v)), map -> {
                map.replaceAll((k, v) -> v == none ? null : v);
                return map;
            });
}

We just replace null with some custom object none and do the reverse operation in the finisher.

4

If the value is a String, then this might work: map.entrySet().stream().collect(Collectors.toMap(e -> e.getKey(), e -> Optional.ofNullable(e.getValue()).orElse("")))

  • 2
    That works only if you are okay with modifying the data. Downstream methods might expect null values rather than empty strings. – Sam Buchmiller Mar 13 at 17:16
3

According to the Stacktrace

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NullPointerException
at java.util.HashMap.merge(HashMap.java:1216)
at java.util.stream.Collectors.lambda$toMap$148(Collectors.java:1320)
at java.util.stream.Collectors$$Lambda$5/391359742.accept(Unknown Source)
at java.util.stream.ReduceOps$3ReducingSink.accept(ReduceOps.java:169)
at java.util.ArrayList$ArrayListSpliterator.forEachRemaining(ArrayList.java:1359)
at java.util.stream.AbstractPipeline.copyInto(AbstractPipeline.java:512)
at java.util.stream.AbstractPipeline.wrapAndCopyInto(AbstractPipeline.java:502)
at java.util.stream.ReduceOps$ReduceOp.evaluateSequential(ReduceOps.java:708)
at java.util.stream.AbstractPipeline.evaluate(AbstractPipeline.java:234)
at java.util.stream.ReferencePipeline.collect(ReferencePipeline.java:499)
at com.guice.Main.main(Main.java:28)
at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:62)
at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:43)
at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:483)
at com.intellij.rt.execution.application.AppMain.main(AppMain.java:134)

When is called the map.merge

        BiConsumer<M, T> accumulator
            = (map, element) -> map.merge(keyMapper.apply(element),
                                          valueMapper.apply(element), mergeFunction);

It will do a null check as first thing

if (value == null)
    throw new NullPointerException();

I don't use Java 8 so often so i don't know if there are a better way to fix it, but fix it is a bit hard.

You could do:

Use filter to filter all NULL values, and in the Javascript code check if the server didn't send any answer for this id means that he didn't reply to it.

Something like this:

Map<Integer, Boolean> answerMap =
        answerList
                .stream()
                .filter((a) -> a.getAnswer() != null)
                .collect(Collectors.toMap(Answer::getId, Answer::getAnswer));

Or use peek, which is used to alter the stream element for element. Using peek you could change the answer to something more acceptable for map but it means edit your logic a bit.

Sounds like if you want to keep the current design you should avoid Collectors.toMap

1
public static <T, K, V> Collector<T, HashMap<K, V>, HashMap<K, V>> toHashMap(
        Function<? super T, ? extends K> keyMapper,
        Function<? super T, ? extends V> valueMapper
)
{
    return Collector.of(
            HashMap::new,
            (map, t) -> map.put(keyMapper.apply(t), valueMapper.apply(t)),
            (map1, map2) -> {
                map1.putAll(map2);
                return map1;
            }
    );
}

public static <T, K> Collector<T, HashMap<K, T>, HashMap<K, T>> toHashMap(
        Function<? super T, ? extends K> keyMapper
)
{
    return toHashMap(keyMapper, Function.identity());
}
  • 1
    upvoting because this compiles. Accepted answer does not compile because Map::putAll does not have a return value. – Taugenichts Apr 24 at 16:22
1

I have slightly modified Emmanuel Touzery's implementation.

This version;

  • Allows null keys
  • Allows null values
  • Detects duplicate keys (even if they are null) and throws IllegalStateException as in the original JDK implementation.
  • Detects duplicate keys also when the key already mapped to the null value. In other words, separates a mapping with null-value from no-mapping.
public static <T, K, U> Collector<T, ?, Map<K, U>> toMapOfNullables(Function<? super T, ? extends K> keyMapper, Function<? super T, ? extends U> valueMapper) {
    return Collectors.collectingAndThen(
        Collectors.toList(),
        list -> {
            Map<K, U> map = new LinkedHashMap<>();
            list.forEach(item -> {
                K key = keyMapper.apply(item);
                if (map.containsKey(key)) {
                    throw new IllegalStateException(String.format("Duplicate key %s", key));
                }
                map.put(key, valueMapper.apply(item));
            });
            return map;
        }
    );
}

Unit tests:

@Test
public void toMapOfNullables_WhenHasNullKey() {
    assertEquals(singletonMap(null, "value"),
        Stream.of("ignored").collect(Utils.toMapOfNullables(i -> null, i -> "value"))
    );
}

@Test
public void toMapOfNullables_WhenHasNullValue() {
    assertEquals(singletonMap("key", null),
        Stream.of("ignored").collect(Utils.toMapOfNullables(i -> "key", i -> null))
    );
}

@Test
public void toMapOfNullables_WhenHasDuplicateNullKeys() {
    assertThrows(new IllegalStateException("Duplicate key null"),
        () -> Stream.of(1, 2, 3).collect(Utils.toMapOfNullables(i -> null, i -> i))
    );
}

@Test
public void toMapOfNullables_WhenHasDuplicateKeys_NoneHasNullValue() {
    assertThrows(new IllegalStateException("Duplicate key duplicated-key"),
        () -> Stream.of(1, 2, 3).collect(Utils.toMapOfNullables(i -> "duplicated-key", i -> i))
    );
}

@Test
public void toMapOfNullables_WhenHasDuplicateKeys_OneHasNullValue() {
    assertThrows(new IllegalStateException("Duplicate key duplicated-key"),
        () -> Stream.of(1, null, 3).collect(Utils.toMapOfNullables(i -> "duplicated-key", i -> i))
    );
}

@Test
public void toMapOfNullables_WhenHasDuplicateKeys_AllHasNullValue() {
    assertThrows(new IllegalStateException("Duplicate key duplicated-key"),
        () -> Stream.of(null, null, null).collect(Utils.toMapOfNullables(i -> "duplicated-key", i -> i))
    );
}
0

Retaining all questions ids with small tweak

Map<Integer, Boolean> answerMap = 
  answerList.stream()
            .collect(Collectors.toMap(Answer::getId, a -> 
                       Boolean.TRUE.equals(a.getAnswer())));
  • I think this is the best answer - it's the most concise answer and it fixes the NPE issue. – LConrad Feb 14 '18 at 19:26
-1

Sorry to reopen an old question, but since it was edited recently saying that the "issue" still remains in Java 11, I felt like I wanted to point out this:

answerList
        .stream()
        .collect(Collectors.toMap(Answer::getId, Answer::getAnswer));

gives you the null pointer exception because the map does not allow null as a value. This makes sense because if you look in a map for the key k and it is not present, then the returned value is already null (see javadoc). So if you were able to put in k the value null, the map would look like it's behaving oddly.

As someone said in the comments, it's pretty easy to solve this by using filtering:

answerList
        .stream()
        .filter(a -> a.getAnswer() != null)
        .collect(Collectors.toMap(Answer::getId, Answer::getAnswer));

in this way no null values will be inserted in the map, and STILL you will get null as the "value" when looking for an id that does not have an answer in the map.

I hope this makes sense to everyone.

  • 1
    It would make sense if a map did not allow null values, but it does. You can do answerMap.put(4, null); without any problems. You are right that with your proposed solution you will get the same result for anserMap.get() if it is not present as if the value would be inserted as null. However, if you iterate over all entries of the map there is a obviously a difference. – Jasper Nov 7 '18 at 10:26
-3

NullPointerException is by far the most frequently encountered exception (at least in my case). To avoid this I go defensive and add bunch of null checks and I end up having bloated and ugly code. Java 8 introduces Optional to handle null references so you can define nullable and non-nullable values.

That said, I would wrap all the nullable references in Optional container. We should also not break backward compatibility as well. Here is the code.

class Answer {
    private int id;
    private Optional<Boolean> answer;

    Answer() {
    }

    Answer(int id, Boolean answer) {
        this.id = id;
        this.answer = Optional.ofNullable(answer);
    }

    public int getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(int id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    /**
     * Gets the answer which can be a null value. Use {@link #getAnswerAsOptional()} instead.
     *
     * @return the answer which can be a null value
     */
    public Boolean getAnswer() {
        // What should be the default value? If we return null the callers will be at higher risk of having NPE
        return answer.orElse(null);
    }

    /**
     * Gets the optional answer.
     *
     * @return the answer which is contained in {@code Optional}.
     */
    public Optional<Boolean> getAnswerAsOptional() {
        return answer;
    }

    /**
     * Gets the answer or the supplied default value.
     *
     * @return the answer or the supplied default value.
     */
    public boolean getAnswerOrDefault(boolean defaultValue) {
        return answer.orElse(defaultValue);
    }

    public void setAnswer(Boolean answer) {
        this.answer = Optional.ofNullable(answer);
    }
}

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List<Answer> answerList = new ArrayList<>();

        answerList.add(new Answer(1, true));
        answerList.add(new Answer(2, true));
        answerList.add(new Answer(3, null));

        // map with optional answers (i.e. with null)
        Map<Integer, Optional<Boolean>> answerMapWithOptionals = answerList.stream()
                .collect(Collectors.toMap(Answer::getId, Answer::getAnswerAsOptional));

        // map in which null values are removed
        Map<Integer, Boolean> answerMapWithoutNulls = answerList.stream()
                .filter(a -> a.getAnswerAsOptional().isPresent())
                .collect(Collectors.toMap(Answer::getId, Answer::getAnswer));

        // map in which null values are treated as false by default
        Map<Integer, Boolean> answerMapWithDefaults = answerList.stream()
                .collect(Collectors.toMap(a -> a.getId(), a -> a.getAnswerOrDefault(false)));

        System.out.println("With Optional: " + answerMapWithOptionals);
        System.out.println("Without Nulls: " + answerMapWithoutNulls);
        System.out.println("Wit Defaults: " + answerMapWithDefaults);
    }
}
  • 1
    useless answer, why should you get rid of null to fix this? This is problem of Collectors.toMap() not null values – Enerccio May 28 '18 at 6:21
  • @Enerccio calm down buddy!! Relying on null values is not a good practice. If you had used Optional, you wouldn't have encountered NPE in the first place. Read up on Optional usages. – TriCore May 30 '18 at 19:42
  • 1
    and why is that? Null value is fine, it's undocumented library that is the problem. Optional is nice but not everywhere. – Enerccio Jun 3 '18 at 8:29

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